IJ@

International Journal of Anarchism

ifa-Solidaritet - folkebladet - © ISSN 0800-0220 - electronic issues ISSN 1890-9485 since 2009 - no 1 (41) editor H. Fagerhus

Bulletin of the Anarchist International


Qatar, Tunisia, Egypt and other
Arab countries on the economic-political map

The Arab revolt and beyond...

Authoritarian degree % =

*) The stars indicate the position of the Norwegian economical-political system after the revolutionary change in 1994/95. All Arab countries are located in the fascist main quadrant of the map. For the libertarian vs authoritarian, capitalist vs socialist and statism vs autonomy degree we have used ",", the European standard instead of American/UK standard, i.e. "." as decimal separator. For most other figures we have used the American/UK standard. The term "ca" is an abbreviation for the latin circa, which means about or approximately.

Fig. 1. Picture of the Anarchist Economical-Political Map

Resolution from:

THE ANARCHIST INTERNATIONAL
www.anarchy.no

Qatar, Tunisia, Egypt and other Arab countries on the economic-political map

Introduction

With Arab countries we mean the 22 members of the Arab League. The main goal of the League is to "draw closer the relations between member States and co-ordinate collaboration between them, to safeguard their independence and sovereignty, and to consider in a general way the affairs and interests of the Arab countries." The Arab Leauge is the main fascist organization of today, with four moderate fascist systems, and eighteen totalitarian fascist systems, with more than 67% authoritarian degree.

In 2011 we have seen popular revolts, called the Arab spring, in most of the Arab countries, and embryo revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya and less significant in some other countries, but no real revolution in democratic direction yet, i.e. a significant change of a societal system's coordinates on the Economic-Political Map and in reality. The fundamental parameters of the systems, see System theory - chapter V., have not changed significantly so far. There have been elections in Tunisia and Egypt, but in general election is just a necessary, but not a sufficient condition for getting rid of a totalitarian system.

In general, elections are necessary for democracy, both semi- and real-democracy, but not a sufficient condition. Elections may end in tears, not to mention grand larceny, murder and even genocide. Elections alone do not amount to a democracy, in the meaning of being within the parliamentary zone of the economic-political map, or even more libertarian. Without institutions that promote accountability, etc., they are too easily exploited by cynical, greedy elites/archs. Real democracy and non-totalitarian system in general include a significant amount of "checks and balances", "checks" include free critical investigations and research where the results are publicly available, and "balances" include balance of strength in societal perspective, and institutions promoting the "checks and balances". More information about democratic institutions broadly defined, see Real democracy - definition.

So far the elections in Tunisia and Egypt have brought quite reactionary islamists to power. They will probably not be better than the old rulers. The elections in Tunisia and Egypt do most likely not fulfill the conditions for entering the parliamentary zone of the economic-political map, not to mention be more libertarian. As mentioned, the fundamental parameters of the systems have not changed signficantly in libertarian direction. Tunisia seems closest to a real revolution in democratic direction, but in case this happens - it seems not very likely, it will probably take a long time. The libertarian degree = 100% - the authoritarian degree %.

03.07.2013 the islamists in Egypt were thrown out of office by the military, and a non-islamist interim president was put at place, also by the military.

This file IJA 1 (41) will be updated when something significant happens.

Qatar is the least authoritarian Arab country. Ruled by the al-Thani family since the mid-1800s, Qatar transformed itself from a poor British protectorate noted mainly for pearling into an independent state with significant oil and natural gas revenues. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Qatari economy was crippled by a continuous siphoning off of petroleum revenues by the Amir, who had ruled the country since 1972. His son, the current Amir Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, overthrew him in a bloodless coup in 1995. In 2001, Qatar resolved its longstanding border disputes with both Bahrain and Saudi Arabia. Oil and natural gas revenues enable Qatar to have a high GDP per capita, 31 558 US $ (2005). For 2007 it is estimated to $ 75 900 PPP, and $ 86 600 at current exchange rate, one of the worlds highest. This contributes to lower the degree of capitalism, but the income-distribution is significantly uneven. The unemployment rate was as low as 0.7% (2007). All in all this is significantly a capitalist country, the degree of capitalism is estimated to 59,5 %. Ethnic groups are Arab 40%, Indian 18%, Pakistani 18%, Iranian 10% and other 14%. Religion: Muslim 77.5%, Christian 8.5%, other 14% (2004 census) . It is ranked as no 40 on the UN's Human Development Index of 2005.

Government type is emirate, a form of  monarchy headed by the Amir, but not without tendencies of democracy, say, the constitution was ratified by a public referendum on 29 April 2003, and endorsed by the Amir on 8 June 2004, made effective on 9 June 2005. Legal system based on islamic and civil law codes, discretionary system of law controlled by the Amir although civil codes are being implemented. Islamic law dominates family and personal matters. Legislative branch is a unicameral Advisory Council or Majlis al-Shura. The constitution provides for a new 45-member Majlis al-Shura; the public would elect two-thirds of the Majlis al-Shura; the Amir would appoint the remaining members; preparations are underway to conduct elections to the Majlis al-Shura. The Council of Ministers is appointed by the monarch. In April 2007, Qatar held nationwide elections for a 29-member Central Municipal Council (CMC), which has limited consultative powers aimed at improving the provision of municipal services; the first election for the CMC was held in March 1999. There are however no political parties.

The degree of statism is estimated to 65,4 %, clearly a statist country. Thus the authoritarian degree is estimated to 62,5 % and the libertarian degree 37,5 %, ranked as no 47 of countries according to libertarian degree. It is thus not a totalitarian system with more than 67% authoritarian degree, but  rather authoritarian. It is located to the left in the populist sector of the fascist quadrant on the economic-political map, thus it is a left populist regime, moderate fascism. Similar systems, but a bit more authoritarian are in the United Arab Emirates, ranked as no 48 of countries according to libertarian degree, with ca 37,4 % libertarian degree, Bahrain 49 (ca 37,3%) and Kuwait  50 (ca 37,2%).

The other Arab countries are totalitarian fascist states, with less than 33,33 % libertarian degree: Libya ranked as no 68 (ca 32,5% libertarian degree),  Oman 74 (ca 31,9%), Saudi Arabia 82  (ca 31,1%), Lebanon 84 (ca 30,9%), Tunisia 92 (ca 30,1%), Jordan 93  (ca 30%), Algeria 105 (ca 28,5%), Syria 108 (ca 28,2%), Occupied Palestinian Territories 110 (ca 28%), Egypt 122 (ca 26,7%), Morocco 127 (ca 25,8%),  Comoros 135 (ca 24,5%), Sudan 144 (ca 23,6%), Djibouti 152  (ca 22,8%), Yemen 154 (ca 22,6%), Mauritania 155 (ca 22,5%), Iraq 177 (ca 20,5%) and Somalia 186 ( ca 20%).

Somalia with its rivaling polyarchy and heavy ochlarchy is the most authoritarian country in the world. These totalitarian fascist states have very little respect for human rights and are ruled very significantly from the top downwards to the boottom/grassroots, both economically and political/administrative. There is a marginal anarchist opposition in some of the countries, say Lebanon, Egypt and Morocco, but most of the oppositions are fundamentalist, islamist, fascist terrorist groups, even worse than the existing regimes. The Anarchist International supports human rights, including labor and womens' rights, and anarchist opposition, in these countries, and the AI-note "What anarchists are against and what they are for" is translated to Arabic by Arab anarchists, see Anarchism in Arabic, but it is a long way to go before anything close to anarchy regarding the societal system seen all in all can be achieved in these countries. At least this was the situation until 2010.

Typical for the situation in 2009/10 - 22.07.2009: Amnesty says Saudi terror fight plagued with abuse. Saudi Arabia is holding more than 3,000 people in secret detention and has used torture to extract confessions in its anti-terrorism crackdown since the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, Amnesty International said in a report. The report criticized the international community for turning a blind eye to the kingdom's methods in its crackdown. Asked about the report, a Saudi Interior Ministry official, Abdulrahman Alhadlaq, said, "These are claims that have to be proven." "Our policies on human rights are very clear and the orders given are for prisoners to be treated with respect and according to international human rights principles," Alhadlaq said. "If anything happened, it would be an individual case and if it is brought to anybody's attention it will be dealt with." - In 2011 the situations have changed a bit...

2011: Is now the time for a development towards Arab democracy? Say, 27.01.2010 protests against the present government, general repression and exploitation in Egypt are entering their third day, angry demonstrators torched a police post and up to a thousand people have been detained. There is a pledge for more people to take the streets again... Similarly protests have broken out in the Yemeni capital of Sanaa calling for the president to step down. Like those in Egypt, they say they have been inspired by events in Tunisia earlier this month, see below. There have also been rallys in Jordan calling for the government to resign over rising prices, unemployment and repression in general. Protests in Lebanon, Algeria, and later Sudan, may also be mentioned.

While many of the protestors are drawing strength from one another, each country in the region has different challenges and pressures and political set ups. It's far from a foregone conclusion that what happened in Tunisia will create a domino effect. Certainly the demonstrators in Tunisia and Egypt have talked about their desire for change and the fear disappearing as they realize they can bring about that change. Are the people at large ready to be paying the personal price to achieve those aims? Is the Middle East ready for a democratic revolution? Are Tunisia and Egypt the future of Arab democracy?

If Arabic countries are to change, the west and particularly the USA must probably also change in the way it treats them. So are streets protests that bring down a government the future model for democracy in Arab countries? Is this the way to bring about change? Is there a danger that with democracy comes instability? Here we will try to answer these questions and present updated news, comments and analysis, from anarchist point of view!

NB! Early in 2011 we have seen popular revolts in most of the Arab countries and embryo revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, but no real revolution in democratic direction yet, i.e. a significant change of a societal system's coordinates on the Economic-Political Map and in reality. And Libya is at the moment (early in 2011) the most authoritarian country in the world, down from ca 32,5% libertarian degree in 2010 to less than 20% now, even worse than Somalia with about 20% libertarian degree in the latest years (se above). Tunisia seems closest to a real revolution in democratic direction. Furthermore the anarchist movement is now present in most Arab countries, both in North Africa and the Middle East. And, say, in Egypt a social-individualist libertarian movement is now quite significant, see the report of 22.02.2011 below.

Direct action against discrimination of minorities in the Arab countries. It is time for international as well as domestic direct actions against discrimination of the popular minorities in the revolts and embryo-revolutions in the Arab countries, especially in Egypt and Tunisia. There have been several reports internationally about violations of human rights of minorities, even reports of murder. Such discrimination must now stop! Majority dictatorship may be as bad as minority dictatorship, and is the opposite of freedom and democracy. If 'two wolves', the majority, decide to eat 'the sheep', the minority, it is the opposite of freedom and democracy. A condition for freedom and democracy is full respect for minorities; religious, ethnic, political and economical etc. and their human rights. 12.06.2011.

Below we follow the Arab Spring over time from the start.

The situation in Tunisia 2010/11 - The Jasmine Revolution...

14.01.2011. Tunisians drive ruler from power in mass uprising. Protesters enraged over soaring unemployment and corruption drove Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali from power Friday after 23 years of iron-fisted rule, an unprecedented popular uprising in a region, i.e. the fascist Arab Leauge, dominated by strongmen who do not answer to their people. Tunisians buoyant over Ben Ali's ouster immediately worried, however, about what's next: the caretaker leadership of the prime minister who took control, and the role of the army in the transition. The upheaval took place after weeks of escalating unrest fueled partly by social media and cell phones, as thousands of demonstrators from all walks of life rejected Ben Ali's promises of change and mobbed the capital of Tunis to demand his ouster in the country's largest demonstrations in generations. "The fall of Ben Ali marks the first ever collapse of an autocratic regime in the face of a popular uprising in the Arab world," said US political risk consultancy Stratfor.

At least 23 people have been killed in the riots, according to the government, but opposition members put the death toll at more than three times that. On Friday, police repeatedly clashed with protesters, some of whom climbed onto the entrance roof of the dreaded Interior Ministry, widely believed for years to be a place where the regime's opponents were tortured. With clouds of tear gas and black smoke drifting over the city's whitewashed buildings, Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi went on state television to announce that he was assuming power in this North African nation previously known mostly for its wide sandy beaches and ancient ruins. "I take over the responsibilities temporarily of the leadership of the country at this difficult time to help restore security," Ghannouchi said in a solemn statement on state television. "I promise ... to respect the constitution, to work on reforming economic and social issues with care and to consult with all sides."

The president promised legislative elections in six months, a pledge that appeared to open at least the possibility of a new government. The Anarchist International applauded the courage and dignity of protesting Tunisians, and urged all parties to keep calm and avoid violence. Ben Ali's downfall sent a potentially frightening message to autocratic leaders across the Arab world. He deftly managed the economy of his small country of 10 million better than many other Middle Eastern nations grappling with sclerotic economies and booming, young populations, turning it into a beach haven for tourists and beacon of stability in volatile North Africa. There was a lack of civil rights and little or no freedom of speech, but a better quality of life for many than in neighboring countries. He had won frequent praise from abroad for presiding over reforms to make the economy more competitive and attract business; growth last year was at 3.1 percent.

But unemployment was officially measured at 14 percent, but far higher among the young - 52 percent of Tunisia's 10 million people - and despair among job-seeking young graduates was palpable. Arabs across the region celebrated on Twitter, Facebook and blogs at news of the Tunisian uprising. Thousands of Tweets congratulating the Tunisian people flooded the Internet and many people changed their profile pictures to Tunisian flags. Egyptian activists opposed to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade regime also looked to the events in Tunisia with hope. About 50 Egyptians gathered outside the Tunisian embassy in Cairo Friday to celebrate with singing and dancing. They chanted, "Ben Ali, tell Mubarak a plane is waiting for him too!" Unconfirmed rumors about Ben Ali's location reached such a fevered pitch that the governments of France and Malta - just two of several countries where Ben Ali was speculated to be heading - put out statements saying they have had no requests to accommodate him. US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Ben Ali had left the country, as widely reported by Arabic TV stations. Saudi Arabian-owned Al Arabiya TV reported that he had landed in the Saudi city of Jeddah.

The 74-year-old leader came to power in a bloodless palace coup in 1987. He took over from a man called formally President-for-Life - Habib Bourguiba, the founder of modern-day Tunisia who set the Muslim country on a pro-Western course after independence from France in 1956. Ben Ali removed Bourguiba from office for "incompetence," saying he had become too old, senile and sick to rule. Ben Ali promised then that his leadership would "open the horizons to a truly democratic and evolved political life." But after a brief period of reforms, Tunisia's political evolution stopped. Ben Ali consistently won elections with overwhelmingly questionable tallies: In 2009, he was re-elected for a fifth five-year term with 89 percent of the vote. Beforehand, he had warned opponents they would face legal retaliation if they questioned the vote's fairness.

US diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks have called Tunisia a "police state" and described the corruption there, saying Ben Ali had lost touch with his people. Social networks like Facebook helped spread the comments to the delight of ordinary Tunisians, who have complained about the same issues for years. Under Ben Ali, most opposition parties were illegal. Amnesty International said authorities infiltrated human rights groups and harassed dissenters. Reporters Without Borders described Ben Ali as a "press predator" who controlled the media. The riots started after an educated but jobless 26-year-old committed suicide in mid-December when police confiscated the fruits and vegetables he was selling without a permit. His desperate act hit a nerve, sparked copycat suicides and focused generalized anger against the regime into a widespread, outright revolt.

The president tried vainly to hold onto power. On Thursday night he went on television to promise not to run for re-election in 2014 and slashed prices on key foods such as sugar, bread and milk. A day later he declared the state of emergency, dissolving the government and promising new legislative elections within six months. Hundreds of police with shields and riot gear moved into the peaceful demonstration nearly six hours after it began on the capital's main Friday in front of the Interior Ministry. Helmeted police fired dozens of rounds of tear gas and kicked and clubbed unarmed protesters - one of whom cowered on the ground, covering his face.

An AP Television News reporter heard gunfire in the center of the Tunisian capital late Friday afternoon, in addition to the popping of tear gas pistols. A few youths were spotted throwing stones, but most demonstrated calmly. Protesters were of all ages and from all walks of life, from students holding mid-street sit-ins to doctors in white coats to black-robed lawyers waving posters. "A month ago, we didn't believe this uprising was possible," said Beya Mannai, a geology professor at the University of Tunis. "But the people rose up." The prime minister suggested that Ben Ali had willingly handed over control, but the exact circumstances of his removal from power were unclear. The prime minister did not say anything about a coup or about the army being in charge, saying only that he was taking over while the president is "temporarily indisposed." "Under Article 56 of the Constitution that holds that in a case of temporary incapacity, the president can delegate by decree his power to the prime minister. Given the temporary incapacity of the President to carry out his duties, I take over the responsibilities temporarily of the leadership of the country at this difficult time to help restore security," Ghannouchi said.

Ghannouchi, 69, is a trained economist who has been a longtime close ally of Ben Ali. Prime minister since 1999, he is one of the best-known faces of Tunisia's government. He also has served as the country's minister for international cooperation and its minister of foreign investment. A founder of the main legal opposition party said the dramatic developments do not amount to a coup d'état. "It's an unannounced resignation," Nejib Chebbi said by telephone. To declare a permanent absence of a head of state, such as in a coup, elections would have to be held within 60 days, he said. "So they declare a temporary vacating of power." In Sudan in 1985, a collapsing economy and other grievances sparked a popular uprising, although the government was eventually ousted by a military coup. However, the closest parallel in the broader Middle East comes from Iran - which is not an Arab nation - where mass demonstrations helped topple the Shah and usher in the establishment of the Islamic Republic in 1979.

Tunisia's giant neighbor Algeria saw huge protests before it was shaken by a military coup in 1992, with a five-man leadership put in place after the army canceled the nation's first multiparty legislative elections that a Muslim fundamentalist party was poised to win. The party, the Islamic Salvation Front, became a vehicle for popular dissent. There were also massive demonstrations in Lebanon in 2005, dubbed the "Cedar Revolution," but those were directed against Syrian influence in the country and not the Lebanese government per se. The protests led to the withdrawal of Syrian forces from Lebanon and the resignation of Lebanon's pro-Syrian prime minister and fresh elections. Al-Qaeda's North African offshoot appeared to try to capitalize on the Tunisian unrest, offering its support for protesters this week. There has been no sign of islamic extremist involvement in the rioting.

Organized mainly by the country's lawyers' union and other unions, Friday's demonstration took place under the watchful eyes of a contingent of riot police officers. But their presence did not keep protesters from slamming the government and Ben Ali. "Public trial for the president's family!" some shouted. "Yes to water and bread, but no to Ben Ali!" There were also calls for democracy, real democracy, i.e. anarchy. So far the libertarian degree has not increased significantly, it may increase, but the situation is far from anarchy by now.

Now the protesters will want to see the fruits of their demonstrations. They won't settle for meagre reform, they won't settle for the same elite remaining in power. They're very happy that the president has gone, but they don't like the regime that surrounded him, and they'll want his cronies out as well. The protests started after an unemployed graduate set himself on fire when police tried to prevent him from selling vegetables without a permit. He died a few weeks later...

15.01.2012. Tunisia: security stepped up after leader Ben Ali flees. Shops sacked, train station burned. Security has been stepped up in centre of the Tunisian capital, a day after President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali was forced from power by street protests. Hundreds of troops are patrolling Tunis and a state of emergency is in force. Interim leader Mohammed Ghannouchi has said his priority is restoring order. Late on Friday Mr Ghannouchi said his "absolute priority" was restoring security in the face of looting and robberies. "We are at the service of the Tunisian people. Our country does not deserve everything that is happening. We must regain the trust of citizens in the government," he said.

Turmoil has continued in Tunisia overnight. Looters and gangs have exploited the security vacuum in the capital. There were scenes of looting overnight in several areas, witnesses said. Rioters burned the Tunisian capital's main train station to the ground and sacked and looted shops in a wave of unrest after the North African nation's president was forced from power. The departure of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali after 23 years of iron-fisted rule - demanded by protesters - appeared not to be enough to quell the unrest -- over soaring unemployment, food price rises, corruption and repression in general -- that has swept Tunisia for nearly a month. Security forces used live ammunition against protesters and dozens of people died...

Soldiers were intervening early Saturday to try to stop looters from sacking a huge supermarket in the Ariana area, 30 kilometers (20 miles) north of the capital. A helicopter circled low over the capital, apparently acting as a spotter for fires or pillaging. Gunfire was heard crackling anew in the mid-morning. Overnight, public television station TV7 broadcast phone calls from residents of working-class neighborhoods on the capital's outskirts, recounting attacks against their homes by knife-wielding assailants. The country's interim leader, former Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi, called in to TV stations overnight to say he had ordered the army and other security forces to intervene immediately in those neighborhoods. The UK, the US, France and the Anarchy of Norway are among the countries advising against non-essential travel to Tunisia.

The palace of Saudi King Abdullah confirmed early Saturday that the ousted president and his family had landed in Saudi Arabia, saying that the kingdom welcomed him with a wish for "peace and security to return to the people of Tunisia." The ouster followed the country's largest protests in generations and weeks of escalating unrest, as mentioned sparked by one man's suicide, and fueled by social media, cell phones and young people who have seen relatively little benefit from Tunisia's recent economic growth. Thousands of demonstrators from all walks of life rejected Ben Ali's promises of change and mobbed Tunis, the capital, to demand that he leave.

As mentioned, the prime minister is now caretaker president. He says he will meet political parties today to try to form a coalition to take Tunisia to early elections. But Mohamed Ghannouchi is closely linked to President Ben Ali's rule and it is unclear if his leadership will be accepted on the streets. A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said: "This is mainly a velvet revolution, a new independence for people who belived in their right to freedom and dignity. This is what thousands of Tunisians on the streets exclaimed, despite a curfew and state of emergency, expressing their delight and joy at the president's departure. He has been replaced by the prime minister on a temporary basis. What lies ahead for Tunisia remains to be seen. The people are now waiting for some indication that the interim administration is prepared to bring in widespread economic and political changes. However, the ochlarchy, mob rule broadly defined, including chaos, must be stopped as soon as possible."

Power change. Later on Saturday the Constitutional Council declared that parliamentary Speaker Foued Mebazaa should be the country's new interim president. Power changed hands for the second time in 24 hours in this North African country after the President fled the country. The head of the Constitutional Court declared that Ben Ali has left office for good, not temporally, negating the prime minister's move to assume power. The speaker of the lower house of parliament, Fouad Mebazaa, temporarily took the highest office, and he has two months (60 days) to organize new elections. An opposition leader said the prime minister had agreed to the creation of a coalition government. In the afternoon Foued Mebazaa was formally sworn in as interim president. In a sign that Ben Ali's rule was over, workers were taking down a portrait of the former president outside the headquarters of his RCD party on Mohamed V Avenue in the center of Tunis.

The people at large are very happy to be free after 23 years of prison. But this optimism could be short-lived as parts of the country descended in to chaos. Squads of men shot at random from cars in Tunis on Saturday. The drive-by shootings, about 10 km from the city center on Saturday and in another suburb on Friday night are practically certain done by the presidential police. They still hope to regain power. Hundreds of troops are patrolling Tunis and a state of emergency is still in force. But looting has continued and a prison fire is reported to have killed many in the resort town of Monastir. Dozens of inmates were killed when they broke out of Mahdia prison and the prison at Monastir, also south of the capital, was on fire after a separate escape attempt, witnesses said, according to Reuters. "They tried to escape and the police fired on them. Now there are tens of people dead and everybody has escaped," said a local man, Imed, who lives 200 metres from Mahdia jail. Forty-two people died in the Monastir break-out, the official news agency said.

PS. 26.01.2011. The interim justice minister said "Some 11,029 prisoners - about a third of the country's prison population - were able to escape... 1,532 prisoners are back behind bars and 74 other prisoners died in fires that broke out."

In suburban Tunis, the big Geant shopping center was on fire, witnesses said. Protesters have threatened to continue their campaign against poverty and repression until the government is gone. "We will be back on the streets, in Martyrs Square, to continue this civil disobedience until ... the regime is gone. The street has spoken," said Fadhel Bel Taher, whose brother was one of dozens of people killed in the protests. A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said that "without a definitive timetable for elections or a transitional government, protests could continue: Although the streets of Tunis are calmer than they have been in several days, Ben Ali's departure is not likely to immediately defuse tension across the country."

An opposition leader who had talks with Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi on Saturday told Reuters Ghannouchi had accepted a proposal from opposition parties to form a coalition government and more talks would be held on Sunday. "We discussed the idea of a coalition government and the prime minister accepted our request to have a coalition government," Mustafa Ben Jaafar, leader of the Union of Freedom and Labour party, told Reuters. "Tomorrow there will be another meeting with the aim of getting the country out of this situation and to have real reforms. The results of these discussions will be announced tomorrow." As mentioned, Ghannouchi said on Friday he was taking over as interim president, before the constitutional announcement. A Tunisian analyst said the announcement did not signify conflict between Ghannouchi and the speaker but that officials were making sure they were in compliance with the constitution.

Troops are patrolling the city centre and a state of emergency is still in force, the soldiers are trying hard to do away with the security vacuum and ochlarchy. The BBC's Wyre Davies said: "There are tanks on virtually every corner in downtown Tunis." The violent ochlarchy came as the Speaker of parliament, Foued Mebazaa, took over as interim president. The political developments came against a backdrop of increasing violence. The new interim president said he had asked Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi - who as mentioned earlier said he was in temporary charge - to form a national unity government. In a televised address, Mr Mebazaa said all political parties including the opposition would be consulted. "All Tunisians without exception and exclusion must be associated in the political process," he said after taking the oath. Under the constitution a new presidential election must be held within 60 days. Ghannouchi confirmed reports that members of Ben Ali's family had been arrested, but did not say who.

Tunisian air space, closed on Friday, was reopened and the official news agency said all airports were open. Lots of European tourists have been stranded by the unrest and were flown home on emergency flights. European travel companies rushed Saturday to retrieve thousands of tourists on package tours to Tunisia. More than 1,000 tourists arrived back in Britain on Saturday after being evacuated from Tunisia, with several hundred more expected to arrive on special flights Sunday. German companies are scrambling to repatriate more than 5,000 tourists in Tunisia. The French national travel agency association, CETO, said French tour operators planned to evacuate tourists shortly and urged people planning trips to Tunisia in the next few days to cancel their plans and change their tickets. Tunisia in recent years has become a popular sun-and-sand destination for Europeans looking to escape wintry weather, and the uprising there caught tour operators by surprise after a sustained period of stability.

Later the exiled head of Tunisia's Islamist party, Rachid Ghannouchi, says he plans to return to the country within weeks. Rachid Ghannouchi has told the BBC he is prepared to join a government of national unity but has not been invited to do so. Mr Ghannouchi says his party is a democratic islamist movement and will not pose a threat of militancy if allowed to take part in democratic politics. A representative in France of the PDP opposition party said it was impossible to organize elections within two months, as proposed by the Constitutional Council. "We do not accept this deadline because at the time there is a revolution in Tunisia and they're in the process of transforming it into a coup d'état so that the party in power can keep its grip," Iyed Dahmani told Reuters in Paris.

The violence and fall of Ben Ali sent shockwaves across the Arab world where authoritarian rulers face pressure from young populations disenchanted with their repressive policies and lack of economic prospects. The Arab League called for calm, Egypt, where Hosni Mubarak has ruled for nearly 30 years, said it respected the choice of the Tunisian people. A small number of Egyptians have held a demonstration in Cairo in support of the Tunisian uprising, closely watched by the security forces. The signs in Arabic read: "Revolution in Tunis, tomorrow in Egypt". The ousting of Tunisia's president after widespread protests could embolden Arab opposition movements and ordinary people to challenge entrenched governments across the Middle East and North Africa. The African Union has condemned what it called "excessive use of force against the demonstrators".

Western powers have long turned a blind eye to rulers in the region who provide a bulwark against islamist radicals. The United States led international calls for calm and for the people of Tunisia to be given a free choice of leaders. French President Nicolas Sarkozy, who refused permission for Ben Ali to enter the country, called for free elections as soon as possible and said it had taken steps to block suspicious movements of Tunisian assets in France. "France is prepared to meet any request for help to ensure the democratic process takes place in indisputable fashion," said the statement, issued after the president met ministers at his office. Paris says Mr Ben Ali's family members who took refuge in France are not welcome in the country and will be leaving. Two of the ousted president's daughters, Cyrine and Nesrine, are said to be in France. French media reports say they are staying in a hotel just outside Disneyland Paris.

Britain condemned the violence and looting and urged restraint from all sides. Germany's Angela Merkel urged Tunisia to introduce "a true democracy" and said the European Union would support it. A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said Merkel's "true democracy" is probably not the same as real democracy...

In the evening some people in Tunis are reporting that the shops are running out of food. "There isn't even any flour," one man told Reuters, "there is nothing. The VIPs have laundered the money and fled and now we are left struggling... My mother will die of starvation. I have not been able to get anything but some pasta and they say they will give us water." Another one said: "There is no flour, no bread and no water. All the stores are closed; only a few are left open." And a third added: "There is a lack of security despite so many soldiers in the streets; it is not enough." As the sun sets, Tunis is once again under curfew. As night fell, a Reuters reporter said suburban neighborhoods were being guarded from looters by impromptu militias, made up of residents armed with clubs and knives. They blocked neighborhoods and only allowed local people to pass.

The future of the country hangs in the balance. There have been reports of looting and gunfire, but also talk of possible moves towards democracy and a unity cabinet... Presidential elections must be held in 60 days according to the constitution. A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA condemned the ochlarchy and calls for "a steady development of the Tunisian economic-political system towards real democracy -- in the long run -- but as fast as possible!"

16.01.2011. Tension in Tunis amid fear of Ben Ali vigilantes. Sunday has seen an uneasy calm in Tunis following the turmoil and violence, i.e. ochlarchy, surrounding the fall of the deposed dictator Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. Occasional gunfire was heard overnight, a change from the heavy shooting of the previous evening. An acrid burning smell was detectable in the Tunisian capital, but at noon no new fires were reported. Despite the strong security presence, witnesses of the recent looting and other ochlarchy believe it was carried out by forces, i.e. vigilantes, loyal to the ousted Tunisian president in a bid to provoke chaos. Today the volatile security situation seems to be somewhat better. Citizens defense groups, i.e. impromptu militias, are protecting their neighborhoods.

One man in November 7th Square called for it to be renamed. Instead of marking the date Ben Ali came to power, he said, it should become January 14th Square to celebrate the revolution. The recent violence has claimed another victim. A Paris-based photographer struck in the face by a tear gas canister on Friday has died of his injuries. Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi was due to hold more talks to try form a coalition government. One opposition leader, Najib Chebbi, has said he believes internationally supervised elections could be held within six or seven months.

Mideast asks after Tunisian revolution: Where next? The stunning collapse of Tunisia's long-ruling president brought cheers from the streets and a flood of messages on Middle East websites Saturday with one overriding question: Could it happen next in Egypt or other iron-fist regimes in the region? There's little doubt that Tunisia's mainly velvet grassroots revolution - a potent mix of economic gripes and demands for political freedoms - will embolden similar calls in a region dominated by ultra-authoritarian leaders and ruling monarchs. Protesters in Cairo mocked Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and trade union activists in Jordan chanted: "Tunisia is teaching us a lesson."

But chances appear far less likely of a rapid domino-style political housecleaning such as what occurred in Eastern Europe after the Cold War. Many states with deep political rifts, such as Egypt and Iran, maintain vast security forces heavily vested in the status quo and they have shown no signs of breaking ranks to join protesters. Other hard-line regimes like Syria come down harshly and swiftly against dissent. And smaller, less authoritarian states, with well-organized political opposition, including Kuwait and Bahrain, provide their native citizens with wide-ranging social benefits that few would dare put at risk with a full-scale mutiny.

"We only have to look at Iran to see the challenges for anyone thinking they can bring change just by going to the streets," said B. Hansen from the IJA-editor group, referring to the massive protests that were eventually crushed after the disputed re-election of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009, see The situation in Iran - IJA 2 (39). Still, he said it's a mistake to underestimate the power of the upheaval in Tunisia. "This gets planted in minds that it is possible. They believe it can happen in their country," Hansen said: "Leaders cannot just dismiss that. Now the bell is ringing and it should be a reminder to other ultra-authoritarian leaders that people are fed up. They need political freedoms and serious economic reforms, that there must be an end to corruption and nepotism!"

Friday's ouster of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali followed the country's largest protests in generations and weeks of escalating unrest among young people and others who have seen relatively little benefit from Tunisia's recent economic growth. Those issues have echoed across the region as many other regimes face similar complaints. In Jordan, more than 5,000 people joined rallies on Friday to protest rising prices and demand the removal of the prime minister. King Abdullah II last week ordered reductions in prices and taxes on some foods and fuels to help ease the burden on the poor.

Messages congratulating the Tunisian people also flooded the Internet on Twitter, Facebook and blogs in the latest example of the web's important role to galvanize and organize political movements. Arab rulers issued few official statements in a possible sign of the tense political climate. The Arab League, the largest fascist organization on the planet Earth, urged calm, saying it was "the beginning of one era and the end of another." In Cairo, a small group of activists gathered outside the Tunisian Embassy for a second day and drew comparisons between the North African countries: claims of chronic corruption and poverty, a heavy-handed security force and limits on the press and Internet. The protesters outnumbered 5-to-1 by riot police - chanted "soon we will follow Tunis" and other slogans against the government of Mubarak, who has ruled for three decades. What happened in Tunis gives hope to that fear can be broken and that dictatorships can be defeated. The time for change will come!

It's this street-born nature of Tunisia's revolt that also has captivated the region, where the standard script of opposition has been islamic-inspired movements such as the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt or Lebanon's Hezbollah challenging Western-backed governments. The popular uprising in Tunisia differed because it wasn't led by a political movement. The factors that led to the beginning of the process in Tunisia exist through the region. But there specific factors, like the extraordinary stupidity and arrogance to which Ben Ali responded to the protests. Iran's state-run media gave matter-of-fact coverage to the Tunisian rebellion and left out any analysis or commentary. Iran's Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast, however, urged Tunisian authorities to heed the "demand of the Tunisian people."

Iranian authorities, meanwhile, have waged an all-out battle on political opposition since the protests and clashes after Ahmadinejad's re-election. It was the country's worst internal unrest since the 1979 Islamic Revolution - perhaps the closest modern parallel to the events in Tunisia, see The situation in Iran - IJA 2 (39). Mohsen Sazegara, a US-based leader of the Iranian opposition, dedicated 15 minutes of his daily webcast to comparing Tunisia to Iran's "Green Movement." He concluded that the Tunisians succeeded because many members of the army and police refused to battle protesters.

The events in Tunisia, however, found an unreceptive audience in ultra-authoritarian archos Moammar Gadhafi, who has ruled neighboring Libya for more than 40 years. In a speech on national television, the Libyan leader criticized the loss of life and questioned the wisdom of ousting one president to replace him with another, and said the Tunisians were making a mistake by causing chaos in their country. "What reason is there to fight?" asked Gadhafi, dressed in an uncharacteristically demure black suit. "Tunisia's situation has never really been so bad that it deserved such a reaction from the people."

The uprising in Tunis also had ripples in Sudan, where voters in the south were marking the end of a weeklong independence referendum that is widely expected to lead to the creation of the world's newest country. Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir, who is wanted on an international indictment for war crimes in the western region of Darfur, also faces a rebellion in the west and east, and internal opposition. A recent hike in prices of oil and basic commodities had caused protests in Sudan universities and calls for resignation of local officials. The economic crunch is expected to increase with the likely southern separation.

Similar cries came from the streets in Damascus, where President Bashar Assad has not matched his liberal economic policies with any political reforms. Rulers in the Arab world should beware, they should work to bring down food prices and allay people's concerns otherwise they could meet the same fate. Activists in the tiny Gulf nation of Bahrain - where majority Shiites have challenged Sunni rulers for greater rights - were denied a license to hold a rally and gathered instead at the Tunisian Embassy to silently place flowers in solidarity with the Tunisian people and their revolution. The Tunisian people seen as a class opposed to the superiors in private and public sector, economically and/or political/administrative, i.e. in income and/or rank.

Israel's prime minister said Sunday that the unrest in Tunisia over the weekend shows why Israel must be cautious as it pursues peace with the Palestinians. Benjamin Netanyahu told his cabinet that the violence following the ouster of Tunisia's longtime president illustrated the widespread instability plaguing the Middle East. He also said it underscored the need for strong security arrangements in any future peace deal with the Palestinians. "We need to lay the foundations of security in any agreement that we make," he said. "We cannot simply say 'We are signing a peace agreement,' close our eyes and say 'We did it' because we do not know with any clarity that the peace will indeed be honored," he said. Netanyahu, who leads the nationalist Likud Party, has long made security a top demand for any future peace deal with the Palestinians.

Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad has spent several years reforming his security forces, which now include hundreds of officers who have received US training. Both US and Israeli officials have praised the progress of the Palestinian forces in cracking down on militants and maintaining law and order in the West Bank. But Israeli officials say the forces are limited in their capabilities. They also note that the Gaza Strip, the other territory claimed for a future Palestinian state, is ruled by the Hamas militant group.

The Palestinians have refused to negotiate with Israel until Netanyahu renews a freeze on Jewish settlement construction in captured areas claimed by the Palestinians. Israel's Tunisian-born deputy prime minister, Silvan Shalom, voiced concern that the tiny Jewish community that remains in his homeland could be in danger. Tunisia has experienced lootings, arsons and random violence, i.e. ochlarchy, since autocratic President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali was driven from power Friday. Speaking to the Associated Press, Shalom said it was important that Tunisia's next ruler remain allied with the West. "What needs to be done these days is to help Tunisia to get over this crisis in order to stick to the moderation and to have good relations with the Western countries," he said. "For sure there are many islamic groups that would like to take an advantage ... What needs to be done these days, is to stop them."

A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said: "We mainly agree with Silvan Shalom regarding the threat from militant islamist groups, i.e. terrorists." Israel Radio played an interview with a man who said he was a leader of Tunisia's 1,300-strong Jewish community. The man, who was not identified because of safety concerns, said Jews were terrified. "We saw the situation deteriorate in seconds ," he said. "The gangs are taking advantage of the fact that there is no government. Nobody is in charge here." The spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said "ochlarchy, i.e. mob rule broadly defined, is a form of government/archy", and once more declared: "Stop the ochlarchy!" and called for "a steady development of the Tunisian economic-political system towards real democracy, i.e. anarchy -- in the long run -- but as fast as possible!"

Gunfire rings out near Tunisia opposition building. Gunfire has rung out in central Tunis near the Interior Ministry, as police and troops try to calm tensions after the president's ouster. Issam Chebbi, a senior member of the main opposition party PDP, says a gunfight also broke out Sunday between security forces and unidentified attackers in front of the opposition party headquarters. A big crowd was gathered in front of the building and heavy security was deployed in the area. Soon afterward, repeated volleys of gunfire were heard nearby, near the Interior Ministry. The source of the shots was unclear. A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said: "We believe this shooting and most of the other ochlarchy are carried out by forces, i.e. vigilantes, loyal to the ousted Tunisian president in a bid to provoke chaos, and call for the return of the "strong man" Ben Ali and his "law and order". A well known fascist tactic, see IAT-APT - Terrorist ochlarchists ... of our time.

The typical fascist tactic of creating chaos (ochlarchy = mob rule broadly defined), falsely naming it "anarchy", and call for the "strong man" and a totalitarian arch/archy, to do away with the "anarchy", is internationally well known. This will however practically certain only result in another form of ochlarchy and no real law and order for the people seen as a class opposed to the superiors, i.e. archs, in private and public sector, economically and/or political/administrative, i.e. in income and/or rank. Other ultra-authoritarian groups of marxist and liberalist origin have often similar tactics! This tactic is just an extension of the very frequent Orwellian "1984" Big Brother type newspeak calling ochlarchy falsely "anarchy" to support archy in general, i.e. x-archy, where x can be anything but not 'an'; in itself an ultra-authoritarian tendency of newsmedia, etc, mentioned in the Oslo Convention. Anarchy is however not ochlarchy, but real democracy. Stop the ochlarchy!"

More gunfire in Tunisian capital as future in question. Tunisian security forces struggled to restore law and order Sunday, arresting the top presidential security chief and trying to stop gunfights that erupted across the capital. Observers worldwide, anarchists and others, were looking to see which way the North African nation would turn as its security forces sought to tamp down the looting, arson and random violence, i.e. ochlarchy, that has erupted since autocratic President Ben Ali fled. Tensions appeared to be mounting between Tunisians buoyant over Ben Ali's departure and his loyalists, who could be losing major perks. Tunisian police arrested the head of the presidential guard and dozens of others, some suspected in drive-by shooting attacks at buildings and people in the capital, Tunis.

To cheers and smiles, some residents of Tunis tore down massive portraits of Ben Ali that were omnipresent during his reign, hanging on lampposts and billboards, gazing down over shops and hotels. Some stretched several stories high. Some gas stations and stores reopened Sunday morning, and it appeared that calm might be returning. But as mentioned a gunfight broke out in the afternoon between security forces and unidentified attackers, probably vigilantes loyal to the ousted Tunisian president, in front of the main opposition party PDP's headquarters. A large crowd swarmed the area in central Tunis after the incident, and heavy security was deployed. Soon after the clash, repeated volleys of gunfire were heard close by near the Interior Ministry, once feared as a torture site. The battle raged for more than an hour.

The prime minister is working on forming a national unity cabinet on orders from the interim president, former parliament speaker Fouad Mebazaa, who has urged him to consult opposition forces. As mentioned, police arrested the head of Ben Ali's presidential guard, Ali Seriati, and several colleagues over accusations they had plotted against state security, aggressive acts and for "provoking disorder, murder and pillaging," the state news agency TAP reported Sunday. Security agents had often fired on unarmed protesters in the last month. More than 50 people have been arrested in the last day on suspicion of using ambulances, rental cars and civil protection vehicles for random shootings, a police official told Associated Press. A crowd of 200 in Tunis cheered one such arrest Sunday.

Dozens of people have died in a month of clashes between police and protesters angry about the repression and corruption of Ben Ali's rule - unrest that ultimately marked the end of his 23-year regime. Tunisians in the capital scurried about for food. Most shops remained closed Sunday and bread and milk were running short. "We're starting to feel it now, but it's temporary. We have to reorganize," said Imed Jaound, who unloads goods at the Tunis port, which has been closed since Friday. Fish mongers were selling 2- to 3-day-old fish from their stocks, said Ezzedine Gaesmi, a salesman at the indoor market in downtown Tunis, where numerous stands were empty. "There's no fresh fish. If it continues for two or three more days, we'll close," he said.

Businesses owned by Ben Ali's family were major targets of looters. The family of the ex-president's wife, Leila Trabelsi, has financial interests from banking to car dealerships. A branch of the Zeitouna bank in Tunis founded by Ben Ali's son-in-law was torched, as were vehicles made by Kia, Fiat and Porsche - brands distributed in Tunisia by members of the ruling family. Many Tunisians were especially overjoyed at the prospect of life without Ben Ali's wife and her family. US diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks discussed the high levels of nepotism and corruption displayed by her clan. This is however probably not a "WikiLeaks revolution". The Tunisian people knew about corruption etc. long ago. They alone are the catalysts of this unfolding drama. Tunisian media reported one brother-in-law of the president, Imed Trabelsi, was attacked by an angry mob at Tunis airport and died from his injuries. The reports could not be immediately confirmed.

A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said: "We call for real law and order! Stop the ochlarchy!! Ad ochlarchy, mob rule broadly defined, any ochlarchist is an arch, not only their bosses -- the arch-ochlarchists -- and thus ochlarchists are not members of the people, seen as a class opposed to the superiors, i.e. archs, in private and public sector, economically and/or political/administrative, i.e. in income and/or rank. We call on the armed defense to continue to support the people! We call on the armed defense and the people's militias: Do away with the ochlarchy, stop and arrest the ochlarchists - NOW!!!"

Tunis gun battles erupt after Ben Ali aide arrested. New interim cabinet Monday? Tunisian forces are exchanging fire near the presidential palace with members of deposed President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali's guard, reports say. Witnesses reported heavy gunfire in Carthage, north of the capital Tunis, where the palace is located. It comes after the ex-head of presidential security, Ali Seriati, was arrested and accused of threatening state security by fomenting violence.

Meanwhile, political leaders are holding talks about a new cabinet. Interim leader Foued Mebazaa, who until Saturday was the speaker of parliament, has as mentioned asked Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi to form a government of national unity. In a national TV address, Mr Ghannouchi said an agreement between the political parties would be announced on Monday. He also pledged "zero tolerance" against anyone threatening the security of the country.

The announcement of Mr Seriati's arrest on Sunday came after the previous day saw widespread violence across Tunisia, including looting, arson and deadly jail riots, i.e. severe ochlarchy. The BBC's Wyre Davies, in Tunis, says that while the Tunisian army does not appear to be interfering in the process of political reform, the motives of some members of the police and security services loyal to the ousted president may be more sinister. Hours after Mr Seriati's arrest was announced, heavy gunfire erupted near the presidential palace in the Carthage area. "The army has launched an assault on the palace... where elements of the presidential guard have taken refuge," AFP news agency quoted a Tunisian military source as saying.

An eyewitness quoted by Reuters news agency said: "There is firing from around the presidential palace, intensive and continuous." There was as mentioned also gunfire near the interior ministry and the headquarters of an opposition party. Two gunmen firing from a roof near the interior ministry were reportedly shot dead by the security forces. In another development, a group of Swedish nationals - who were apparently in the country on a wild boar hunting trip - were attacked and badly beaten in Tunis amid reports that foreign nationals were among the presidential guard. There have also as mentioned been attacks targeting businesses and buildings connected with the former president and his family.

Before the upsurge in violence on Sunday, the interim government had shortened the overnight curfew by four hours. Curfew hours - which ran from 17.00 (16.00 GMT) to 07.00 (06.00 GMT) for two nights - are now between 18.00 and 05.00. A state of emergency remains in force and there is very little economic activity. Schools, government offices and most shops are closed. The US Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, has urged Tunisia's new leadership to restore order and adopt broad economic and political reforms. A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA once more declared: "Stop the ochlarchy!" and called for "a steady development of the Tunisian economic-political system towards real democracy, i.e. anarchy -- in the long run -- but as fast as possible! But the situation is very far from anarchy now!!"

Police made more arrests Sunday, including looters and some of the deposed president's relatives. Imed Trabelsi, the nephew of the ousted president, was detained along with 23 other relatives, Tunis TV reported. Tanks patrolled the streets of Tunis on Sunday. Government troops appeared to be in control of the presidential palace in the seaside suburb of Carthage on Sunday evening, but sporadic gunfire continued around the neighborhood as night fell, said Mohamad Guiga, a nearby resident, according to CNN. CNN-TV also falsely called the present situation i Tunisia "anarchy", and gets a Brown Card from IAT-APT according to the Oslo Convention.

Guiga said most Tunisians are happy with Ben Ali's ouster and have rallied to each other's aid since the uprising. "We are proud of those people -- simple people, young people, normal people -- who take care of each other," Guiga said. "One who doesn't have bread gives the other one bread, or water." Human rights groups and unions have said more than 50 people were killed in the protests before Ben Ali fled. As mentioned, at least 42 more died when a blaze swept through a prison in the eastern city of Monastir, but the cause of the blaze had not been determined.

Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi said on Tunis TV Sunday night that a deal to form a new government -- with members of the opposition in the cabinet -- was near. Among those Abid said would be joining the government was Mustapha Ben Jafar, who is expected to serve as health minister. Earlier, Jafar said opposition leaders don't want to be a fig leaf for the ruling party, but want an active role in running Tunisia after more than two decades of authoritarian rule. "The most important thing for me is to build during this period the basis for a democratic Tunisia where all the citizens participate and where we can build a civic society -- this is what I spent 40 years of my life working for," Jafar said. Restrictions on internet use -- including filters on social networking sites such as Facebook and YouTube -- that were put in place under Ben Ali have been dropped, and the new government has vowed to ease restrictions on freedoms.

Meanwhile, Tunisians armed with sticks and knives, i.e. impromptu militias, continue to guard their neighborhoods, stopping suspicious cars near their homes. Security forces did not have the manpower to guard the suburbs, they say. On Sunday evening, some Tunis residents blocked roads with makeshift barriers of branches and bins, in an attempt to protect their homes from looters. The impromptu militias have support from the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA.

17.01.2011. Tunisia's ruling party target of new protests. Tunisia's ruling party is calling for calm after the ousting of the country's president, and is promising to quickly announce a new coalition government. But police have attempted to break up a protest by hundreds of people calling for the ruling party to also relinquish power. Officers are using water cannon, teargas and firing shots into the air. It seems the complaints against unemployment, corruption and repression will not disappear easily. Shooting could be heard in parts of the capital overnight, as Tunisian special forces clashed with former presidential security personnel. The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA support the people's demand to get the old ruling party out of the central administration.

An Algerian who set fire to himself on Wednesday survived, but another who staged the same sort of protest on Saturday has died of his injuries. Three other Algerians have set fire to themselves in recent days in what appears to be an imitation of the December the 17th protest by a Tunisian which started the revolt against the government there. The men appear to have had similar demands, chose to stage their protests in front of administrative buildings or police stations. Protests last week in Algeria led to five deaths, 800 injuries and more than 1000 arrests, and forced the government to slash prices of basic foodstuffs. Reports of self-immollations surfaced also in Egypt and Mauritania on Monday, in apparent imitation of the Tunisian events. The downfall of the 74-year-old Ben Ali, who had taken power in a bloodless coup in 1987, served as a warning to other autocratic leaders in the Arab world. His Mediterranean nation, an ally in the US fight against terrorism and a popular tourist destination known for its wide beaches, deserts and ancient ruins, had seemed more stable than many in the region.

The European Union said Monday it stood ready to offer economic aid and help Tunisia become a democracy. Finance Minister Christine Lagarde of France - a former colonial overseer of Tunisia - told French radio Monday that Paris is keeping a close watch on the assets of Tunisians in French banks. During a visit to neighboring Algeria on Monday, US President Barack Obama's top counterterrorism official, John Brennan, said the United States was ready to help the Tunisian government in holding "free and fair elections in the near future that reflect the true will and aspirations" of Tunisians. Moncef Marzouki, a professor of medicine who leads the once-banned CPR party from exile in France where he has lived for the last 20 years, told France-Info radio he would be a candidate in the presidential election. "The question is whether there will be or won't be free and fair elections," said Marzouki, whose movement is of the secular left.

Later UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called for a return to stability "as soon as possible." Speaking in Abu Dhabi, Ban told reporters the new government should protect human rights and guarantee freedom of speech and association. But he said he remained "extremely concerned" about the ongoing clashes in the streets. "This is a moment for the Tunisian people to strengthen the country's longstanding culture of political moderation and its attachment to peace," he said. "I call on the government and all stakeholders to ensure a prompt restoration of the rule of law, and to respect and accommodate the aspirations of the people. Tunisia must regain its stability as soon as possible, to pursue the path of development and prosperity."

Tunisia analysis. It is becoming increasingly obvious that opposition parties, groups not recognized by the present temporary interim government, and the protesters in Tunisia in general, are not going to sit quietly and let the remnants of the old regime continue to rule after making some cosmetic changes. They have taken to the streets demanding nothing short of dismantling the very system of repression and control the ruling party had in place for 50 years. How the interim prime minister and president respond to such protests will give an indication as to whether they are serious about making genuine political reforms, or whether the old political upper class is determined to hold on to power.

Monday's protesters shouted slogans against Mr Ben Ali's Constitutional Democratic Rally (RCD), as they made it clear they wanted the ruling party to have no place in the new government. The atmosphere was mixed, with the sound of teargas being fired and gunshots ringing out during occasional skirmishes, interspersed with scenes of celebration and a rendition of the national anthem. After a night of fighting between troops and gunmen loyal to Mr Ben Ali, tanks were patrolling in the capital and other cities in an attempt to restore order on Monday.

Meanwhile France urged Tunisia to quickly form a new government and denounced "criminal gangs" which it said were opposing the change of government. However the problem is that the Constitutional Democratic Rally (RCD) in general is criminal and ochlarchist! The new cabinet should thus be without the RCD!

PS. 18.02.2011 BBC reported: French Foreign Minister Michele Alliot-Marie has defended her handling of the Tunisian crisis, saying France had been surprised by events. Socialist opposition leader Martine Aubry accused the government earlier of a "deafening silence". It had failed to condemn the violent repression of protests, she said. The government long supported President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali as an economic ally and as a perceived bulwark against islamist militancy. However, once it became evident he had lost power on Friday, President Nicolas Sarkozy's government appeared to drop him abruptly. Ms Alliot-Marie said that France had a duty to support democracy while respecting the rule of law and refraining from meddling in the affairs of another state. "Be honest, all of us, politicians, diplomats, researchers and journalists, were surprised by the Jasmine Revolution," she told the National Assembly's foreign affairs committee on Tuesday.

The foreign minister said she had been "scandalised" by French opposition reaction to her suggestion last week that France might help Mr Ben Ali's government restore order. Her words, she said, had been distorted and she insisted she was "sensitive to the sufferings of the Tunisian people". Earlier, in an interview on French TV channel France 2, Ms Aubry said: "There has been an absolutely deafening silence from the French government." She condemned Ms Alliot-Marie for having suggested that France might help the Ben Ali authorities to "restore calm". "She probably did not mean sending troops but when a people is fighting with extraordinary dignity to restore democracy and France, land of freedoms, steps back, the world cannot understand and the Tunisian people cannot understand," she said.

Tunisia was a French protectorate until 1956. Christian Bouquet, a North Africa expert and geopolitics professor at the University of Bordeaux III, says the French government relied for years on Mr Ben Ali as a "rampart against islamic militancy". But policy towards the Tunisian president "suddenly went into reverse gear" last week, he told Reuters news agency. "There was without question a brutal realisation of the fact that France's initial position was going to hit a wall," the political scientist said.

And meanwhile, long queues have appeared at petrol stations and many people are complaining of food shortages caused by the unrest. Shops in the center of Tunis remained shuttered Monday, and police were deployed in force. A semblance of normal daily life returned in other areas of the capital where shops, gas stations, pharmacies and supermarkets reopened. Many people returned to their jobs and others rushed to buy scarce stables like bread, fish and milk.

New interim national unity cabinet. In the afternoon Tunisia's interim prime minister announced a national unity cabinet, probably hoping to quell simmering unrest following the ouster of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali amid huge street protests. Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, a longtime ally of Ben Ali, and several top ministers retained their posts in the shake-up of the new interim cabinet. The move comes amid continued unrest in the North African country after Ben Ali fled the North African country on Friday - 23 years after he first took power. The cabinet will be led by incumbent Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi, and aims to prepare Tunisia for elections. Ghannouchi, who has been premier since 1999 and has kept his post throughout the upheaval, said the current ministers of defense, interior and foreign affairs would keep their posts. Until new presidential elections are held, the country is being run by interim president Fouad Mebazaa, former speaker of the lower house of parliament, also a veteran of Tunisia's ruling party.

The announcement of the new interim government included the news that Tunisia's information ministry would be abolished. Mr Ghannouchi also announced that all political prisoners would be freed, as one of an array of measures aimed at loosening up a political system that for decades was effectively under one-party rule. Ghannouchi said all non-governmental associations that seek it would be automatically recognized, and all the restrictions on the Tunisian League for the Defense of Human Rights would be lifted. He also said the government would create three new state commissions to study political reform, investigate corruption and bribery, and examine abuses during the recent upheaval.

CNN reported: Tunisia's new government leadership will include members of the current regime, opposition leaders, and independents, Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi announced Monday. Speaking on state TV, Ghannouchi said the 19 ministers leading an interim unity government will include six members of the current regime, three opposition leaders, and 10 independents. The opposition figures include Mustafa Ben Jaafar, who will serve as health minister; Ahmad Ibrahim, education minister, and Ahmad Najib Al Shabi, a.k.a. Najib Chebbi, minister of local development. Among those leaders who will stay in place from the current regime is Ahmad Friaa, the interior minister. According to BBC he was appointed by Mr Ben Ali to mollify demonstrators. Foreign Minister Kamal Morjane retains post. Slim Amamou, a prominent blogger who was arrested during protests, is secretary of state for youth and sport. The ministers include two women.

The new cabinet will be tasked with leading Tunisia toward new elections, the prime minister said. Under Tunisia's constitution election must be called within 60 days. But some members of the opposition want more time, to allow the public to get know the choices in a country known for one-party rule.

Friaa, speaking later on state TV, said 78 people have died in the clashes across several weeks and 94 have been injured, among them many police officers. He urged people to stop riots and to work with police. He vowed that those who should be held responsible for mistakes of the past will be punished. And Friaa ended his speech saying, "Yes for democracy, yes freedom, no for chaos." Friaa also said the cost of the turmoil of recent weeks is 3 billion Tunisian dinars (about 1.6 billion euros, about $2 billion US).

Whatever emerges, the new leadership will first face the challenge of restoring order. Looting, gunbattles, and score-settling have roiled the country since Friday, when a month of street protests against years of repression, corruption and a lack of jobs brought down Ben Ali.

Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi's announcement came amid growing pressure from demonstrators for Tunisia to make a clean break with the policies of the former president, who as mentioned was in office for 23 years. Many opponents of Ben Ali's rule have taken to the streets to express their hopes that the new government would not include of any remnants of his iron-fisted regime, i.e. the Constitutional Democratic Rally (RCD). As mentioned, earlier Monday security forces fired tear gas to repel angry demonstrators ahead of the announcement of the new interim government. About two thousand people packed into a major road in Tunis. As the demonstrators tried to work their way toward the headquarters of the ruling party, police opened fire with tear gas. Later, a small, peaceful group of youths carried signs reading "GET OUT" - marching under the gaze of police, some of hundreds of security forces deployed in the capital. Lots of protesters demanded Ben Ali's former cronies be locked out. Opposition officials told CNN there were other peaceful demonstrations in towns in central and southern Tunisia...

A union leader upset at the prospect of a government full of old guard ministers, predicted growing demonstrations to press for an end to power positions for the RCD - Ben Ali's political party. "It (RCD) left by the back door and is coming back through the window," said Habib Jerjir, member of the executive bureau of the Regional Workers' Union of Tunis. "The RCD still holds the power," said Hedi Guazaouni, 29. With the potential for change after Ben Ali's flight from the country Friday, "This is a chance not to be missed," he said. Hylel Belhassen, a 51-year-old insurance salesman, summing up the concerns of some, saying: "We're afraid that the president has left, but the powers-that-be remain. We're afraid of being manipulated."

There is much uncertainty over whether the inclusion of several veteran ministers in senior positions will be acceptable to those protesting on the streets. Is this enough to stop the protests? Probably not, but what will the police and the army do then?? And the people, seen as a class opposed to the superiors in private and public sector, economically and/or political/administrative, i.e. in income and/or rank -- at large???

A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA declared: "Stop the ochlarchy! We have seen a short glimpse of real democracy - anarchy, i.e. more influence on the management of the societal system from the grassroots, the people, seen as a class opposed to the superiors in private and public sector, economically and/or political/administrative that is in income and/or rank; than the other way around -- when the old ruler Ben Ali left due to popular protests Friday!! But the system seen all in all is very far from real democracy - anarchy!!! We call for a steady development of the Tunisian societal system i.e. the economic-political system seen all in all, towards real democracy - anarchy -- in the long run -- but as fast as possible!!!! Thus we call for a) more socialism, less capitalism, i.e. economical plutarchy; and b) more autonomy, less statism, in Tunisia, see System theory - Chapter V.B.!!!!!"

18.01.2011. Tunisia's Mohammed Ghannouchi defends new government. Tunisia's PM Mohammed Ghannouchi has defended the inclusion of members of the old regime in his new government. The retained ministers have "clean hands" and have always acted "to preserve the international interest", he told French radio Europe 1. But he promised "justice" for those behind recent street "massacres". As mentioned President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali was overthrown on Friday after a month of protests in which the government now admits 78 people died. In the interview on Tuesday, Mr Ghannouchi described Tunisia as going through a "historic change".

He repeated pledges made on Monday of a new "era of freedom", which would see political parties free to operate and a free press. Ghannouchi told Europe 1 that Tunisia is heading toward a new era in which freedom of the media -- including TV, internet and the press -- will be enforced."This is an essential measure that needs to be done," Ghannouchi said. Tunisia has entered "an era of liberty," the interim PM said in the interview with France's Europe-1 radio posted on its website. "Give us a chance so that we can put in place this ambitious program of reform." He insisted the ministers chosen "have clean hands, in addition to great competence," suggesting that experienced officials are needed along with opposition leaders in a caretaker government to guide the country before free elections are held in coming months. He said free and fair elections would be held within six months, controlled by an independent election commission and monitored by international observers. Ghannouchi emphasized that a new election will take place in six months and will be the first election to be held in a free Tunisia.

He described himself as a "transition" leader and said he did not claim to be "legitimate". Ghannouchi also said that "we will not forgive" those responsible for wrongful shootings, including people who may have been personal officers of Ben Ali, and that "all those who were behind this massacre will be held responsible." As mentioned, weeks of demonstrations have left 78 dead, the government said. Many of the injured were police officers, according to the country's interior minister. It was not immediately clear how many may have been shot by those affiliated with Ben Ali. Ghannouchi -- who said the military didn't shoot people -- emphasized that he never gave any order for police to shoot people and only allowed tear gas and rubber bullets. "It is better to give your life up than to create a carnage," Ghannouchi said he told police. Despite vowing that those behind the deaths of protesters should face justice, when asked whether he thought Mr Ben Ali himself should face trial, he replied: "I cannot say that."

Mr Ghannouchi defended ministers who retained their jobs in his new unity government, saying that they were "needed", and that "thanks to their dedication they managed to reduce certain people's capacity to do harm. They manoeuvred, delayed and bought time to preserve the national interest," he said. The interim PM claimed that his announcement Monday to include ministers from iron-fisted President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali's old guard in a new unity government was a necessary step "because we need them in this phase." In the interview with Europe 1 radio, he said such officials kept their positions "because we need them in this time of building democracy." "All ministers who have retained their jobs have clean hands and they are very competent. They also have a merit. With their dedication, they have succeeded in reducing the destructive capacity of some areas," he said.

But Mr Ghannouchi told Europe 1 that the head of Tunisia's banned islamist party Ennahdha, Rached Ghannouchi, would only be allowed to return to Tunisia if a life sentence imposed on him in 1991 was cancelled by an amnesty. Responding to a question about claims that it was really Mr Ben Ali's wife, Leila Trabelsi, who held the reins of power towards the end of his rule, Mr Ghannouchi replied: "We have that impression". Western governments, as well as the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA, earlier indicated they expected more reforms and political freedoms to be announced. But there has been little official reaction from the other, mainly ultra-authoritarian governments, in North Africa and the wider Arab world.

Police fire tear gas on Tunisia protesters. Riot police fired tear gas at angry protesters Tuesday as Tunisia's prime minister defended the decision to include members of the deeply unpopular old regime in a government shake-up aimed at quelling the country's simmering unrest. Tunisia's capital awoke to bustling, everyday life for the first time since its ousted president fled the country last week, but the peace quickly ended downtown as police lobbed tear gas to scatter about 200 protesters marching toward the Interior Ministry - many in the crowd coughing, sputtering and tearing up. Helicopters circled overhead. All in all about 300 protesters gathered in central Tunis Tuesday morning, with police lobbing tear gas canisters to disperse them. Officers beat some demonstrators. One man had his arm broken. The people were angry about the country's new "unity" government, saying they don't want anyone from the old administration, which fell apart after longtime president Ben Ali fled last week. "No leftovers from the old regime!" they chanted.

Later BBC reported: Tuesday saw new demonstrations in Tunis and reports of protests elsewhere. For hours protests have been starting and stopping in Tunis, as the police fire into the air and use tear gas and rubber batons to break up the crowds. Hundreds of people have been forced to scatter, but they then regroup to recommence their demonstrations. The protesters' message is clear - they are holding placards reading "The RCD must go!" - and the protests seem unlikely to stop soon. Fresh demonstrations were reported in Sfax, Regueb, Kasserine and Sidi Bouzid - where the revolt began in December when a 26-year-old man set himself on fire.

Riot police were deployed in central Tunis as large crowds gathered to voice their anger at the make-up of the new government. Police broke up at least one rally and clashed with some protesters, who waved banners and chanted anti-RCD slogans. "We don't want this revolution to come from this criminal party," one protester told Reuters news agency. "We do not want this [Prime Minister Mohammed] Ghannouchi who ruled the country with [former President Zine al-Abidine] Ben Ali and was a witness to our slaughter for 23 years. We never want him." Selma Beji, a Tunisian native who is pursuing a master's degree in the United States, said: "There are a couple of oppositionists, but honestly, in Tunisia, it's known that the opposition is with the government." L. Jakobsen S.G. ICC of the anarcho-syndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World (IWW) said to AIIS that "The Constitutional Democratic Rally (RCD) in general is not only criminal but also ochlarchist! The new cabinet should thus be without the RCD!"

Lotfi Al Ahwal, a senior member of the General Union of Tunisian Workers (UGTT), has confirmed that the union's administrative committee is calling for all of its members to resign from the recently formed "unity" government. Three secretaries have already resigned, Al Ahwal said. The union's administrative committee, which met on Tuesday in a Tunisian suburb, decided not to accept any government that has officials from the old regime and called for demonstrations against the ruling party. UGTT held an extraordinary meeting at which it decided not to recognize the new government. The junior transport minister, Anouar Ben Gueddour, has said he and two other ministers, Abdeljelil Bedoui and Houssine Dimassi, are leaving the interim government. All three are members of the UGTT. A UGTT representative reportedly told state TV their decision was due to the continued presence of the RCD in the government.

The UGTT played a key role in the protests that ousted the former president. UGTT is not a party but a movement that acts like a lobby and has a big nationwide base to mobilize people around the country. The group's supporters staged the protest in central Tunis on Tuesday, calling for a general strike, constitutional changes and the release of all imprisoned union leaders. Meanwhile, police fired tear gas at protesters angry that the old guard retained so much power.

Mr Ghannouchi had hoped to placate protesters on Monday by announcing a government of national unity - which as mentioned included members of the opposition, but also retained members of the RCD in key ministerial positions including the defense, interior and foreign portfolios. But while some protesters appeared ready to wait and see, many immediately described the new interim government as a sham. As mentioned already three ministers have left Mohammed Ghannouchi's interim "unity" cabinet... Later, Mr Ghannouchi's choice as health minister, Mustafa ben Jaafar from the Union of Freedom and Labour, refused to take up his position, a senior party official said. Thus in the evening four ministers have left the interim "unity" cabinet.

BBC has a summary of the situation: Tunisia: Key players. The most interesting news is the following: The Congress for the Republic is a banned secular party led by Moncef Marzouki from Paris. Mr Marzouki has denounced political parties in Tunisia for co-operating with the Ben Ali regime. He has said he intends to contest elections when they are held and returned to Tunisia on 18 January. The party has campaigned for human rights, an independent judiciary and free elections.

A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA declared: "We have seen a short glimpse of real democracy - anarchy, i.e. a bottom up approach, more influence on the management of the societal system from the grassroots, the people, seen as a class opposed to the superiors in private and public sector, economically and/or political/administrative that is in income and/or rank; than the other way around, a top down approach -- when the old ruler Ben Ali left due to popular protests Friday! The Jasmine Revolution started Friday 14.01.2011 with a glimpse of anarchy!! But the system seen all in all is very far from real democracy - anarchy!!! We call for a steady development of the Tunisian societal system i.e. the economic-political system seen all in all, towards real democracy - anarchy -- in the long run -- but as fast as possible!!!! Thus we call for a) more socialism, less capitalism, i.e. economical plutarchy; and b) more autonomy, less statism, in Tunisia, see System theory - Chapter V.B.!!!!! As a start The Constitutional Democratic Rally (RCD) should give up the powerful key positions in the new interim cabinet...and the interim president... and play a small minority role!!!!!!"

The president and prime minister in Tunisia's day-old interim government have left the ruling RCD party, state TV says, in an apparent bid to calm protests that have raged for days. State TV reported that the two men were quitting the RCD to "split the state from the party". The AFP news agency quoted state news agency TAP as saying that the RCD (Constitutional Democratic Rally) had also expelled former President Ben Ali from its ranks. But protesters say no members of the old regime should retain power, and have demanded the RCD be disbanded. Despite the resignations and the street protests, a number of ministers were sworn in on Tuesday in official ceremonies in Tunis.

A spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA declared: "We have seen a short glimpse of real democracy - anarchy, i.e. a bottom up approach, more influence on the management of the societal system from the grassroots, the people, seen as a class opposed to the superiors in private and public sector, economically and/or political/administrative that is in income and/or rank; than the other way around, a top down approach -- when the old ruler Ben Ali left due to popular protests Friday! The Jasmine Revolution started Friday 14.01.2011 with a glimpse of anarchy!! But the system seen all in all is very far from real democracy - anarchy!!! We call for a steady development of the Tunisian societal system i.e. the economic-political system seen all in all, towards real democracy - anarchy -- in the long run -- but as fast as possible!!!! Thus we call for a) more socialism, less capitalism, i.e. economical plutarchy; and b) more autonomy, less statism, in Tunisia, see System theory - Chapter V.B.!!!!! As a start The Constitutional Democratic Rally (RCD) and members of the old regime in general, should give up the powerful key positions in the new interim cabinet...and the interim president... and play a small minority role!!!!!!"

19.01.2011. "Tunisia is divided over whether to tolerate the interim cabinet. We suggest an international UN-based representation in the caretaker government, say, from the Anarchies of Norway and Switzerland!" a spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said to AIIS.

Swiss ban on Ben Ali funds. Tunisia 'to investigate Ben Ali family's assets'. Tunisian prosecutors have opened an investigation into foreign assets of toppled President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali and his family, reports say. The inquiry will examine possible illegal transactions and foreign bank accounts, the official TAP news agency reported. The move came as Swiss officials ordered a freeze on any funds held there by Mr Ben Ali. In Geneva, Swiss Foreign Minister Micheline Calmy-Rey said the decision to freeze any funds of Mr Ben Ali was to prevent assets being withdrawn and also to ensure that a new Tunisian administration would be able to retrieve assets taken illicitly. The ban also applies to any assets held by "his entourage", the foreign ministry said in a statement. A Swiss judicial source told Reuters news agency that an association of Tunisians living in Switzerland had sought the freezing of assets including a building on Geneva's exclusive Rue du Rhone and a Falcon 9000 jet said to be at Geneva airport.

Meanwhile, more than thousand Tunisians rallied against their new interim government, as the leadership tried to defuse public anger over the continued power of the former ruling party. In central Tunis on Wednesday protesters waved banners and chanted, calling for all links to the old regime to be severed. "This will continue every day until we get rid of the ruling party," said Faydi Borni, a teacher. "We got rid of the dictator but not the dictatorship. We want rid of this government that shut us up for 30 years." "Ben Ali has gone to Saudi Arabia! The government should go there too," more than 1,000 protesters chanted in central Tunis, referring to former president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali who fled on Friday after 23 years of iron-fisted rule. "We want a new parliament, a new constitution, a new republic! People rise up against the Ben Ali loyalists!" they chanted at the peaceful demonstration. Some of them waved placards reading: "Down with the RCD!" In the evening BBC reported that several thousand demonstrated...

Cabinet meeting 'still up in the air'. An opposition leader who has joined the government as regional development minister told AFP the first cabinet meeting would be held on Thursday, but a government spokesman said the exact date was still up in the air. An opposition source said the priorities at the cabinet meeting would be to draw up a national amnesty law for victims of the former regime, as well as concrete moves to break up the RCD's stranglehold on organs of state. The authorities meanwhile eased the timing of a curfew that has been in place for days, saying the security situation had improved, but a state of emergency that bans any public assemblies remained in place. Traffic was visibly heavier in Tunis and some shops and offices re-opened.

The UN said on Wednesday it would send a team of human rights officials to Tunisia to investigate the recent violent protests in which more than 100 people have died. "This team should be on the ground by next week," UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said in Geneva.

20.01.2011. Old sour RCD-wine in new bottles. All ministers in Tunisia's transitional government who were members of the ousted president's RCD party have quit the party, state television reported. However, the ministers are to keep their seats in the country's unity cabinet, the report added. "This represents just old sour RCD-wine in new bottles, it does not increase the credibility of the interim cabinet, and the protests will probably continue!" a spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said to AIIS.

Earlier, it was announced that more than 30 members of the former president's family had been arrested. State television showed what it said was gold and jewellery seized during raids on their properties. The official statement said those being held were suspected of crimes against Tunisia.

As the situation in Tunisia remained tense, troops fired warning shots as protesters marched in central Tunis. Protesters climbed over the RCD party offices in central Tunis and dismantled the sign bearing its name, carrying off pieces of its red letters. They also dismantled a sign with yellow letters. While police repeatedly shot at protesters in the weeks leading up to Ben Ali's ouster, killing several, the army has been playing more of a peacekeeping role since it was brought in to try to restore order last week. Soldiers were called in to protect strategic sites and public buildings, and have been manning checkpoints around the capital.

Several thousand demonstrated Thursday, many chanting "The people want the government down!" Others waved baguettes to symbolize the need to end food shortages. One father, Ahmad al-Ouni, brought his children aged 8 and 4 to the demonstration with a backpack of snacks and juice. "I want them to smell their free country and to see the new Tunis without fear," al-Ouni said while his children used colored pens to draw Tunisian flags on paper. Another demonstrator said the protests will continue until all ministers and members of parliament with links to the RCD party are removed from power. "This revolution cannot be stolen from us and we will not tire from demonstrating, and we will come out everyday if we have to," said Mohsen Kaabi, 55, a former military officer.

Judges also staged a demonstration in Tunis demanding the resignation of all judges who worked for the ousted president. There were also reports of protests on Thursday in the towns of Gafsa and Kef .

Tunisia's new interim government held its first cabinet meeting, nearly a week after the fall of President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. The meeting had been postponed amid opposition calls not to give key posts to members of Mr Ben Ali's RCD party. Political wrangling had delayed the inaugural meeting of the interim cabinet. Hours before it was due to start, a minister (Zouheir M'dhaffar), who had belonged to the RCD announced he was pulling out of the government. Earlier, the RCD dissolved its central committee after its members on the interim cabinet quit the party.

In a sign of the difficulties facing the interim cabinet, one minister, a former member of the ruling party [RCD], resigned Thursday, the official TAP news agency said. Zouheir M'dhaffar was a member of Ben Ali's party but was not considered close to the ousted leader. "I am stepping down for the higher interests of the country in this delicate situation to try to bring the country out of crisis and ensure a democratic transition," the official Tap news agency quoted Zouheir M'Dhaffar, minister of state in the prime minister's office, as saying. As mentioned, four other ministers - among the former outsiders named to the "unity" government - resigned earlier in the week. Demonstrators have criticized the country's new "unity" government for being mostly made up of old guard politicians from the RCD, which was founded by ousted President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Associated Press reported that demonstrators today, "demanded that the government - dominated by members of the old guard - be dismantled..."

Top of hypocrisy. Ministers in the interim "unity" cabinet met for four hours Thursday afternoon and came out showing a united front. The new government spokesman Tayyib Al Bakouchi told reporters: "We will not sleep until normalcy returns to all aspects of life in [the] country." Higher Education Minister Naguib Ahmed Ibrahim said that all political prisoners would be released no matter what their ideology. The government declared three days of national mourning, and held a moment of silence for the people killed in nearly a month of unrest leading up to Ben Ali's departure Friday. "Three days of national mourning is the top of hypocrisy from the old sour RCD-wine in new bottles. We recommend 'tea and coffee'," a spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said to AIIS.

21.01.2011. The demonstrations, almost festive, continue. About 1,000 demonstrators gathered in the courtyard of Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi's offices, some climbing lampposts and hanging Tunisian flags and hand-lettered signs. Central Tunis has seen near-daily protests in the past week by those who say the caretaker government is still too dominated by cronies of ousted President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Friday's protest in Tunis, the seaside capital, started at the long-dreaded Interior Ministry then moved to Ghannouchi's offices. The wall of one building was covered with anti-government and pro-revolutionary graffiti, including "Death to the Dictatorship" spray-painted in black letters.

Police in some locations were joining ranks with protesters. Officers climbed atop their patrol cars with protesters, waving flags and chanting along with demonstrators outside the prime minister's office. Outside the Interior Ministry a policeman in tears took off his uniform cap and joined the marching demonstrators to applause by protesters. The government as mentioned says 78 civilians were killed, many shot by police, in nearly a month of protests over unemployment, corruption and repression in general that eventually forced Ben Ali to flee. Also as mentioned, a French photographer was killed as were some security forces, and scores of people were injured. Opposition members say the death toll was much higher.

Tunisians began three days of mourning Friday, lowering flags and broadcasting recitations of the Quran to mourn dozens who died in the protests that drove their autocratic leader from power. On Friday, flags were lowered at public buildings around Tunisia, and television showed little but Quran recitations. In Tunis, however, many shops and businesses opened as usual.

And the protest near the Interior Ministry was almost festive, with women ululating and crowds carrying balloons. Omar Shahbani, a 43-year-old auditor, carried 15 balloons of different sizes and colors. "I brought the beautiful colors of the Tunisian people," he said. "The balloons make people happy and remind us of the festival that freedom is." He said the mood was similar to 1987, when Ben Ali took power in a bloodless coup. "I was 23 in 1987 and today I feel like I'm 23 again. My youth has returned to me with this revolution," he said. Some protesters held a sign in English referring to President Barack Obama's "Yes, we can" campaign slogan: "They said 'We can,' Tunisians say, 'We DO!"

As mentioned, ministers in the interim government, Tunisia's first multiparty cabinet, met for the first time Thursday. The government has already seen several resignations since it was formed Monday. The government suggested that islamists imprisoned under Ben Ali would be given amnesty and pledged to restore goods and real estate appropriated by the ruling party. Tunisians espousing political islam are now seeking a place in the government. Still, they will face many challenges in this westward-looking nation where abortions - taboo in many muslim societies - are legal and -- according to Associated Press -- muslim headscarves are banned in public buildings. Tunisia is also a beach and desert haven for European tourists and a US ally in the fight against terror.

Family of dead Tunisian hero wants democracy. The family of the young man who set himself ablaze, triggering a popular uprising that overthrew Tunisia's autocratic president, wants Tunisians to honor his memory by fighting for democracy. Mohamed Bouazizi's mother calls every day for "...new fair policies - policies that my son inspired," at her son's concrete tomb, according to the Associated Press. Mohamed Bouazizi was a 26-year-old university graduate without a steady job. He struggled to make ends meet for his widowed mother, four brothers and three sisters.

Having failed to find better employment, he would fill up a rickety wooden cart with fruits and vegetables and wheel it into the town market. His relatives said he was harassed by municipal officials for not having a license to sell the vegetables. When he didn't pay bribes, town authorities broke up his cart and stopped him from selling his wares. His family said a municipal official hit him, spat in his face, and called him filthy when they destroyed his small business. In despair, he stood on his vegetable cart, poured a liter and a half of gas on his body and set it on fire. "My son has always been a hardworking person, and it never occurred to me that he would think about burning himself," said his mother. "But the insults and humiliation from the municipal authorities became too much - how was he supposed to pay bribes and keep his family fed?"

His self-immolation Dec. 17 - which left him in intensive care, wrapped head to toe in white bandages - resonated with other young graduates struggling to find jobs, sparking protests first in his town and then, town by town, around the country. After two weeks days hovering between life and death, he died Jan. 5. Others died too, protesters killed in clashes with Tunisian police, or those who imitated Bouazizi's suicidal act. As mentioned, in recent days self-immolations have taken place in Egypt, Algeria and Mauritania, apparently inspired by Bouazizi...

For decades, Tunisia has falsely promoted itself as an Arab world success story, a stable place where the economy is stronger than in neighboring countries, women's rights are respected, unrest is rare and European tourists can take stress-free vacations at beach resorts. But the recent protests have exposed a side of Tunisia that the country has long tried to hide: general repression and exploitation, the poverty of the countryside, poor job prospects for youths and seething resentment at the government of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, who had ruled Tunisia with an iron fist since 1987. As mentioned, nearly a month of protests following Bouazizi's self-immolation drove Ben Ali to flee to Saudi Arabia a week ago...

Bouazizi's sister, Samia, called for a new system "that will give us our rights as (a) real citizens, not just lip service ... that knows the value of the word 'citizen' because this is the right of my brother and it is the right of all Tunisians." The young man's house is small and bare, with uncarpeted floors, a few couches to sit on and a refrigerator in the hallway. A set of vegetable scales that he used on his cart lays on the floor as a reminder of the profession he used to feed his family. "The day Mohamed burned was like a small tree that burned but left its roots deeply planted in the ground," said his aunt Radia Bouazizi. "I pray that the people of Tunisia do not waste this opportunity for revolution." Visiting Bouazizi's tomb, a teenage brother cried softly as he fell on the grave.

IAT issued a honorary Black Star to the dead heros of the Jasmine Revolution. The Internationa Anarchist Tribunal issued a honorary Black Star in memory of Mohamed Bouazizi and the other dead heros of the Jasmine Revolution, declaring that their loss of life in struggle for real democracy, including Human Rights, must not be in vain. They will always be remembered...

Meanwhile Tunisia's UGTT labor confederation urges a 'collegial salvation cabinet'. Tunisia's main labor confederation has called for the government appointed after the overthrow of President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali to be replaced by a cabinet not linked with his regime. A spokesman for the General Tunisian Workers' Union (UGTT) told AFP news agency such a "collegial national salvation" cabinet was what Tunisians demanded. As mentioned, on Tuesday the UGTT withdrew from the interim administration, led by long-time PM Mohammed Ghannouchi. Mr Ghannouchi has since formally left Mr Ben Ali's RCD party saying his government needed "clean hands", but also said the transition to democracy needed experienced politicians. The UGTT's deputy head, Abid Briki, told AFP that its officials had met on Friday and were calling for the government to stand down. They also called for a "collegial national salvation cabinet to be set up, in accordance with the demands of the street and political parties". The Anarchist International - AI/IFA, the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA and International Workers of the World (IWW) mainly agree with UGTT in this case!

"Day of Rage" in Jordan. Thousands of Jordanians calling for their government to step down marched in several cities Friday in an outpouring of anger over economic hardship and a lack of democratic reforms in the constitutional monarchy. The organizers of what was dubbed a "Day of Rage" represented a broad swath of Jordan's opposition, including the Muslim Brotherhood, left-wing groups, anarchists and trade unions.

Later the Tunisian prime minister pledged to quit politics. Tunisia's prime minister pledged Friday to quit politics after elections that he says will be held as soon as possible, amid protests by citizens still angry at officials linked to their deposed president's regime. Mohamed Ghannouchi said in an interview on Tunisian television Friday he will leave power after a transition phase leading to legislative and presidential elections "in the shortest possible timeframe." Protesters have been demanding for days the departure of all remnants of the old guard under ousted President, including Mohamed Ghannouchi.

"My role is to bring my country out of this temporary phase and even if I am nominated I will refuse it and leave politics," Ghannouchi insisted. Ghannouchi did not say why he is leaving politics or specify when the elections would be held. He said the elections must be a success "to show the world that our country has a civilization." The prime minister also pledged that all of the assets held abroad by Ben Ali's regime had been frozen and would be returned to Tunisia after an investigation. He did not elaborate. "Mohamed Ghannouchi's only real legitimate and civilized role is to contribute to an interim 'collegial salvation cabinet' or similar as soon as possible!" the Anarchist International - AI/IFA, the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA and International Workers of the World (IWW) declared, in a joint statement Friday evening.

22.01.2011. Street pressure mounts on PM to go. Police rallied. A hike in their salaries is necessary to do away with corruption. It's time for libertarian economics. This means work, and protests in the evening!

Thousands of protesters who overthrew Tunisia's president took to the streets again on Saturday to accuse his lieutenants of clinging to power and to demand new leaders now. Hundreds broke through a half-hearted police cordon at the office of Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi: "No place for men of tyranny in a national unity government," read one banner. Ghannouchi, who stayed on to head a would-be unity coalition when strongman Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali fled a week ago, made an emotional late-night plea for patience on television on Friday. He portrayed himself as a fellow victim and pledged to end his political career as soon as he could organize elections.

But as he held meetings with cabinet colleagues on Saturday, thousands of people on the streets of Tunis and other towns demonstrated their rejection of what many call his token attempt to co-opt a handful of little-known dissidents into government. One demonstrator outside the premier's office said: "We want to tell Mr Ghannouchi the definition of 'revolution' -- it means a radical change, not keeping on the same prime minister." Even policemen, once the feared blunt instrument of Ben Ali's 24-year rule, were declaring changed loyalties -- in Tunis thousands joined in chant of "We are innocent of the blood of the martyrs!" at a rally to show their support for the "Jasmine Revolution," in which police bullets and batons killed dozens. As mentioned, it was police harassment of a young vegetable seller last month that prompted him to burn himself to death in protest at unemployment and corrupt rule, triggering the wave of unrest.

The response of the street protesters, who have electrified oppressed and impoverished Arabs from the Atlantic to the Gulf, was scornful: "Since 1990, Ghannouchi has been finance minister, then prime minister," said student Firass Hermassi outside Ghannouchi's office. "He knows everything, he's an accomplice." Another protester, Habib Dridi, said Ghannouchi was "too late" in making apologies and distancing himself from a system he served at cabinet level for 20 years: "We need people with a new mentality. People with dirty hands cannot implement a clean program," he said. "He needs to apologize and withdraw." Meanwhile in Algeria, riot police have broken up a march by hundreds of protesters demanding the authorities overturn a law banning public gatherings. Some demonstrators waved Tunisian flags - a nod to the street unrest that led Tunisia's president to flee.

Former leaders of Ben Ali's ruling party, the RCD, have retained high profile ministries such as interior and foreign affairs in Ghannouchi's makeshift unity coalition. Dissident politicians brought into government were given less influential posts such as higher education and regional development. As mentioned, five ministers have already quit the interim government, including one opponent of Ben Ali and three representatives of Tunisia's big trade union, a key player in the revolt. Authorities have said they arrested 33 members of Ben Ali's family for crimes against the state. On Friday, Interior Minister Ahmed Friia named one of those held as Imed Trabelsi, a nephew of Ben Ali's wife Leila. Others would be hunted abroad. The new government has said schools and universities will reopen on Monday and sporting events will resume soon.

At least 2,000 police rallied in downtown Tunis, an epicenter of protest and clashes between youths and police that forced President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali to quit the country he ruled with an iron fist for 23 years. It was a significant development for this North African country where police who carried out Ben Ali's policies were widely feared by citizens. The rally took place near the hulking Interior Ministry, a symbol of the dread that Ben Ali's regime inspired for many Tunisians. Saturday's crowd on Avenue Bourguiba, where daily protests have been held, drew many plainclothe and uniformed police with red armbands.

They sought to press demands like the creation of a labor union, better pay and - like other protests in recent days - the ousting of any members from Ben Ali's party from the government. Officers climbed onto their official cars, blew their whistles and waved flags and signs. Some exchanged hugs to congratulate each other about their chance to protest. Many were joined by their families. "I am not afraid to come down to the street," said Rida Barreh, 30, who has been an internal security officer for five years. "I work 12 hours a day and yet only get paid 500 dinars ($350, 250 euros) a month."

"A hike, especially in bottom line police's salaries, is necessary to do away with corruption," a spokesperson for the World Economic Council (WEC) said to AIIS, also declaring, "it is time for libertarian economics to do away with the unemployment and increase GDP in Tunisia! This means work, and protests mainly in the evening!!

23.01.2011. Ad new leaders? We are against all leaders = rulers! For leaders = managers, i.e. significant self management, i.e. real democracy including human rights!

As mentioned, thousands of protesters who overthrew Tunisia's president took to the streets again on Saturday [22.01.2011] to accuse his lieutenants [including interim president Mr Ghannouchi] of clinging to power and to demand new leaders now. One demonstrator outside the premier's office said: "We want to tell Mr Ghannouchi the definition of 'revolution' -- it means a radical change, not keeping on the same prime minister." At least 2,000 police rallied in downtown Tunis. They sought to press demands like ... the ousting of any members from Ben Ali's party from the government...

"The Jasmine Revolution must have a clear aim: Ad new leaders? We are against all leaders = rulers! For leaders = managers, i.e. significant self management, i.e. real democracy including human rights!" the Anarchist International - AI/IFA, the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA, the International Workers of the World (IWW) and the World Economic Council declared, in a joint statement early Sunday 23.01.2011.

Caravan of Liberation - Topple the government! A "Caravan of Liberation", from the poor rural areas, set of Saturday 22.01.2011 and reached the capital Tunis Sunday 23.01.2011, joining other protesters. The caravan used cars, trucks and motorcycles and some hitch-hiked or walked. The demonstrators scattered throughout the capital - near the prime minister's office, and the finance and defense ministries, and a city office building. The main trade union, the General Tunisian Workers' Union (UGTT) backed the protest. All in all thousands of protester demonstrated against the government in Tunis Sunday. Some 1,000 demonstrators from Menzel Bouzaiane - the rural area where protests against Tunisia's authoritarian rule began in December - had joined the "Caravan of Liberation" to the capital, according to BBC. Many were from Sidi Bouzid, the bleak central city where the "Jasmine Revolution" was sparked a month ago by one despairing young man's suicide. The protesters from Tunisia's poor rural heartlands demanded that the revolution they started should now sweep the remnants of the fallen president's old guard from power.

Protesters have in general not been satisfied by the PM's pledge to quit after elections. He and other former loyalists of the feared ruling party placed in powerful key-positions in the interim government face mounting pressure to step down. For days, lots of protesters have gathered at the premier's office, mainly tolerated by policemen anxious for their own futures after Ben Ali. The demonstrators enjoy wider support among a population that is unused to free political expression. Euronews reported: "The Caravan of Liberation" has arrived in Tunis and chants of "topple the government" are echoing round the Tunisian capital. On the final day of national mourning Tunisians from across the country are demanding an end to the interim government of Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi. "We have to finish it forever. Ghannouchi and his lot, get rid of them all," said one protester... Ghannouchi was as mentioned prime minister under deposed President Ben Ali.

"The aim of this caravan is to make the government fall," said Rabia Slimane, a teacher taking part in the caravan protest. On Sunday lots of people who had been driven to the capital in the "freedom caravan" surrounded Ghannouchi's building in central Tunis. "We are marginalized. Our land is owned by the government. We have nothing," said Mahfouzi Chouki from near the city Sidi Bouzid, which lies about 300 km (200 miles) south of Tunis and a world away from the opulent coastal resorts favored by Ben Ali's elite. According to Euronews, reports suggest a group tried to storm the prime ministers office but were repelled. Protesters outside unfurled a banner in honor of Mohammed Bouazizi, the 26-year-old street seller who set himself alight after police in Sidi Bouzid confiscated his wares and scales last December. Demonstrators said they would not let the legacy of Mohamed Bouazizi, who set himself alight in protest at poverty and oppression, end with Ben Ali's flight to Saudi Arabia and the establishment of a government dominated by his lieutenants. "The people want this government to fall," they chanted.

Some new arrivals brought food and bedding. They planned to defy a curfew to camp out and press home their demands. "We came from Sidi Bouzid, from Kairouan, from Gefsa ... to bring our voice to the capital," said one man, Safi Adel. Amin Kahli, also from the Sidi Bouzid region, said he was honoring the memory not only of Bouazizi but dozens of others who died when demonstrators took on Ben Ali's armed police. "My brother was leaving home for work when a sniper shot him in the chest," Kahli said. "He was only 21. I want justice for him and I want this government to fall." "We don't want Sidi Bouzid to continue to be marginalized like it was in the previous decades," said Nabil, a French language teacher who lives in the town of Menzel Bouzayane near Sidi Bouzid.

Many marchers held aloft signs saying "Long live a Free Tunisia". "We have gotten rid of the head of the snake but the tail is still alive - and we need to completely kill it," said protester Nizar Bouazziz, a 24-year-old student who said he walked to the rally from Sidi Bouzid. "We are here to support our people and the revolution," he added. "We don't want to see one party gone and then another same oppressive party in its place. We want the Tunisians who have been forced into exile and who have good education and money to come back and invest in this country." An exile blogger who won fame for his lampoons of Ben Ali returned to Tunisia from Canada on Sunday to a cheering welcome from hundreds of young fans, some of whom urged him to run for president. "The internet ... was the basic motor in getting rid of the tyrant," the blogger, Tarek Mekki, told Reuters.

Arrests - Probably none of the old rulers, including the present interim president and PM, have "clean hands". Tunisian police have placed two former allies of the ousted president under house arrest, the official news agency reported Sunday, as protesters kept up pressure on the caretaker government to lock the old guard out of power. The news came as the new protest march, the "Caravan of Liberation", against the interim government reached the capital Tunis. The crackdown against some former cronies of ousted President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali marked the latest desperate moves by the tenuous interim government, full of Ben Ali's old guard, to respond to an incessant groundswell of opposition. State news agency TAP said former Ben Ali allies Abdallah Kallel and Abdelaziz Ben Dhia have been placed under house arrest. The media also said that the police were searching for Abdelwahhab Abdalla - another former adviser to Mr Ben Ali. Kallel, the Senate president and a former government minister, was stopped from leaving the country after Ben Ali fled.

A Geneva-based legal advocacy group, Trial, said torture was widespread in Tunisia while Kallel was interior minister in the early 1990s. Officials said on Saturday they would investigate the interior ministry's role in the deaths of protesters and revise laws to prevent the rise of another strongman, but probably none of the old rulers, including the present interim president and PM, have "clean hands". Ben Dhia is considered one of Ben Ali's most influential advisers, and Abdallah was a top political adviser to the former president who kept tabs on communication - notably on Tunisia's powerful state-run media. Sunday was the last of three days of national mourning.

Probably on the way out... After weeks of public upheaval and the shooting deaths of some protesters by police on orders from Ben Ali's government, which included present interim Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, demonstrators have led peaceful protests daily in Tunis to call on the caretaker government to rid itself of Ben Ali's old guard. The PM and many other interim cabinet members and the interim president are Ben Ali-era holdovers. They are all probably on the way out...

In Yemen hundreds of students demonstrated. Tunisians' revolt has electrified millions across the Arab world who suffer similarly from high unemployment, rising prices and corrupt rule -- heavy repression and exploitation in general -- often by rulers backed by Western powers as a bulwark against radical islam. Arab governments have responded to recent protests with some concessions -- and a lot of police repression. In Yemen hundreds of students demonstrated on Sunday after the arrest of a woman who had led previous protests demanding a Tunisian-style uprising. Among worrying signs for authoritarian rulers has been the way new technologies and social networks appeared to galvanize diffuse popular rage into a movement capable of overthrowing what was one of the region's most durable police states, Tunisia.

24.01.2011. While the protests continue... IIFOR's proposals to a new "The people's interim cabinet", a slim cabinet for and of the people, seen as a class as opposed to the superiors in private and public sector, in rank and/or income.

As further Tunisian protests break out Monday 24.01.2011, the International Institute for Organization Research, IIFOR, presented proposals to a new "The people's interim cabinet". It is a slim secular 12 members' cabinet, assuming that a majority of Tunisians would vote yes to a secular central and local administration to avoid a.o.t. a Taleban like regime -- and strong anti-terrorism laws -- in a constitutional referendum:

The people's interim cabinet

1 - international representation/minister from UN say, from the Anarchy of Norway or the Anarchy of Switzerland.
3 - from the main labor confederation, UGTT, one of them PM.
1 - from agricultural cooperatives or farmers' confederation, municipal and development minister
1 - from domestic opposition parties, secular
1 - from exiled opposition parties, secular
2 - from economists' rank, industrial and finance ministers
1 - from lawyers' ranks, justice minister
1 - from bloggers/internet experts
1 - ex-RCD, earlier member of the old ruling party, with the most "clean hands", to participate in an orderly dismantling of this ultra-fascist party in public and other administration.

All members of the new cabinet are assumed to have a) managerial experience and b) be well educated, and of course c) have no ochlarchical record and d) have participated in direct actions against the old regime as well as the present "unity" cabinet. Clerics, military, police and judges are not allowed in the cabinet. The new cabinet, "The people's interim cabinet", shall of course work within the framework of and/or compatible with real democracy. The IIFOR will monitor the situation in Tunisia and the work of "The people's interim cabinet" and give advice!

"The Jasmine Revolution must have a clear aim: Ad new leaders? We are against all leaders = rulers! For leaders = managers, i.e. significant self management, i.e. real democracy including human rights!" the Anarchist International - AI/IFA, the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA, the International Workers of the World (IWW) and the World Economic Council repeated, in a joint statement Monday 24.01.2011.

Further demonstrations have been held in Tunisia's capital Tunis Monday with scuffles breaking out between authorities and protesters. The latest unrest, which saw police fire teargas, took place on Monday morning after hundreds of activists defied an overnight curfew. They had camped out to demand all of the old guard, former RCD-members, and allies of ousted President Ben Ali, quit the transitional government. Observers believe the next week could prove crucial for Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi's interim government. Many Tunisians, especially those from the country's rural heartlands – continue to see it as tainted with the old guard of the fallen president. The Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi's ultra-fascist interim "unity" government must be replaced with The people's interim cabinet!!!

As for the interim president, also from RCD, his next and only duty should be to appoint The people's interim cabinet, and then in practice be sacked, and the president job be de facto vacant until new presidential elections are held. The PM can be the head of the country in practice.

By the way, ad the report about the "scuffels" in the morning today, more and somewhat other information was published later on. Associated Press reported: Tunisian protest tear-gassed, teachers strike. Authorities clashed with anti-government protesters outside the prime minister's office Monday, teachers went on strike, and police demanded the right to form a union... Following an overnight 'sleep-in' in defiance of the country's curfew, scores of protesters from Tunisian provinces gathered in central Tunis, shouting anti-government slogans. As the crowd grew rowdy, police fired tear gas grenades in the air, and some demonstrators shattered the windows of police cars. Thus some protesters were quite ochlarchical and perhaps not the police? The situation seems to have been somewhat in a "grey zone" regarding ochlarchy vs direct action.

Noisy street demonstrations have continued since Ben Ali's departure, but most have been peaceful and non-ochlarchical. The confrontation Monday morning was brief and involved a small group of protesters, and the atmosphere seemed calm soon afterward. At one point the army chief of staff, Gen. Rachid Ammar, addressed the protesters, promising the army would be the "guarantor of the revolution" and urging calm. Gen. Ammar is widely considered a hero in Tunisia for reportedly refusing an order to open fire on protesters, leading Ben Ali to fire him. He was reinstated once Ben Ali was ousted. While Tunisia's army is respected, police have long been feared. Scores of protesters in Tunisia's recent unrest were shot by police bullets and heavy repressed in general. Thus the RCD went from just ultra-authoritarian to very ultra-fascist on the economic-political map. The RCD-gangsters, although several of them formally have left the party, are still in reality probably rather ultra-fascist.

Police officers were holding a separate protest of their own near the Interior Ministry in central Tunis, demanding to be able to form a union. Schools were set to reopen Monday after protracted closure because of the unrest, but teachers went on strike. Some students joined the demonstrations instead of heading to their classrooms. The protesters are angry that holdovers from former President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali's regime have leading posts in the interim government in place since last week. State TV also reported Monday that a former Ben Ali political adviser who had been sought by police, Abdelwaheb Abdallah, has been located and placed under house arrest. ITUC, France and USA have today declared support for a movement of the Tunisian system towards democracy.

25.01.2011. Towards trials of suspected criminals of former RCDs included the interim PM and president, inspired by the Nuremberg-trials and the International Criminal Cort (ICC)... ITUC reaffirms its support.

"We call for trials of suspected criminals, the ultra-fascists, of RCD and former RCDs included the present interim PM Mohamed Ghannouchi, the interim president and the rest of the RCD-gang, inspired by the Nuremberg-trials and the International Criminal Cort (ICC). We will say no more at the moment, but this is a strong argument for the present so called "unity" government to step down or in an other way be sacked!" the Anarchist International - AI/IFA, the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA, the International Workers of the World (IWW) and the World Economic Council declared in a joint statement Tuesday 25.01.2011.

INTERNATIONAL TRADE UNION CONFEDERATION - ITUC OnLine 014/250111 - Tunisia: ITUC Reaffirms Its Support for the UGTT and Calls for Genuine Democratic Transition

Brussels, 25 January 2011: The International Trade Union Confederation reiterates its total support for its Tunisian affiliate the UGTT and the Tunisian people in their struggle for the establishment of true democracy after the fall of the dictatorship of the deposed president, Ben Ali.

Although the government decreed that schools would reopen on Monday, the overwhelming success of the first day of the teachers' strike, with a participation rate of over 90%, decided otherwise. The striking primary school teachers, like most of the demonstrators still gathered outside the Prime Minister's offices in the Casbah in Tunis, are calling for the resignation of the transition government owing to the presence of former leaders of President Ben Ali's regime. Yesterday afternoon, police used tear gas and violence against the protestors.  The ITUC firmly condemns such tactics.

"We fully support our Tunisian affiliate the UGTT," stated Sharan Burrow, general secretary of the ITUC. "The violence perpetrated over the last five weeks against the demonstrators has already cost too many lives and too much suffering. It must stop immediately. The opening of genuine, constructive dialogue with the UGTT – instead of the attacks on our affiliate that have appeared in the pro-government media in the last few days – and with the rest of the democratic forces in the country is necessary to ensure a peaceful transition towards true democracy that will protect fundamental freedoms, notably the freedom of expression, and will ensure social justice and economic development for all."

The ITUC welcomes the United Nations initiative to send a mission to Tunisia, due to arrive on Tuesday, but hopes that the mission will be able to live up to the challenges faced. The International Trade Union Confederation again calls on its affiliated organisations worldwide to mobilise against the violence meted out to the Tunisian demonstrators and express their solidarity with their legitimate demands. It was the suicide, on 17 December 2010, of a young street vendor in Sidi Bouzid following the confiscation of his merchandise by the authorities that triggered the movement of popular revolt which spread rapidly throughout the country, claiming the lives of over 100 people according to the UN, and led to the departure of former President Ben Ali.

As the street demonstrations multiply the ITUC has expressed serious concern, on 21 January, at the gestures of despair by citizens in several other countries of the region who see no hope for the future. Sharan Burrow calls once again on the governments of the region to be open to real social dialogue and listen to the legitimate aspirations of their people.

The ITUC represents 176 million workers in 301 affiliated national organisations from 151 countries and territories. Website:  http://www.ituc-csi.org and http://www.youtube.com/ITUCCSI. For more information, please contact the ITUC Press Department on: +32 2 224 0204 or +32 476 621 018

Undaunted Tunisian protesters rally again. Lots of Tunisian protesters demonstrated outside the interim prime minister's office to demand the removal of members of the ousted president's regime still in the government. A rally in Tunis early Tuesday took place a day after authorities fired tear gas on protesters in the same area. Many people bundled up in blankets slept outside near the prime minister's office overnight, in defiance of a curfew initiated in response to unrest that forced President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali to flee. Politicians in Tunisia plan to create a council to monitor the country's interim government.

It follows days of angry protests outside the interim prime minister's office in Tunis. People are angry that members of the ousted Ben Ali regime are trying to cling to power. On Monday a government official promised that a reshuffle was imminent but still argued that ministers from the ousted regime may remain in the interests of "policy continuity", i.e. a power grab with probably more ultra-fascism. Thus, there will most likely be more demonstratons etc.! Tunisia's "Jasmine Revolution" has sparked protests in the Middle East and North Africa, and much of the world is watching to see how the birth pangs of Tunisian democracy play out.

"Day of revolt" in Egypt. Tens of thousands of protesters have taken part in unprecedented anti-government demonstrations in Egypt, organized via Facebook, drawing inspiration from Tunisia's recent popular revolt. At least three people are reported to have been killed during a day of rare anti-government protests. In Cairo, where the biggest rallies were held, state TV said a policeman had died in clashes. Two protesters died in Suez, doctors there said. In Cairo, police used tear gas, water cannon and more in an attempt to disperse the angry crowds. As night fell in Cairo, thousands of demonstrators remained in the city centre around Tahrir Square, vowing to camp out overnight and setting the stage for further confrontation. There were appeals on Facebook for food and blankets for those staying put. Activists had called for a "day of revolt" in a web message.

New "Day of Rage" in Lebanon. Grass-roots fury rippled across Lebanon on Tuesday. Lebanon's president, Michel Suleiman, appointed Hezbollah-backed Najib Mikati to lead the country's government, a step seen by supporters of caretaker prime minister Saad Hariri's Western-backed Future Movement as a power grab by the Iranian-backed Shiite movement. Supporters of Hariri called for a "Day of Rage." About 2,000 protesters gathered in Al Nour Square in Tripoli, Lebanese internal security forces said. Protesters burned tires along roadsides in the northern towns of Halba and Al Abdeh. Demonstrators were also beginning to gather in the southern port city of Sidon and across the capital, Beirut. Mikati spoke shortly after his appointment, telling CNN he is not Hezbollah's man and asking for time to prove himself in the new post.

26.01.2011. Fascist government supporters get Brown Cards. The anti-government protests continue. UGTT is arranging a general strike... In the central city of Gefsa, Tunisian soldiers fired in the air to disperse hundreds of demonstrators, the first time the army has intervened since Ben Ali's departure on Jan. 14, and a young man set himself alight. Witnesses said Alaadine Kmat had set himself alight in Gefsa but remained alive. Kmat burned himself after the army intervened to break up a protest outside the union headquarters. Also a few fascist Tunisians have demonstrated in support of the RCD-dominated interim government formed after Ben Ali's fall, later clashing with protesters who complain that it is dominated by former members of his RCD party.

"Now this is a dictatorship of the people where there is anarchy...," said a spokesperson for the fascist government supporters, a doctor who gave his name as Labib, according to France24. The IAT-APT handed out Brown Cards to Labib and the other fascist government supporters, according to the Oslo Convention, declaring: The fascist Doctor Abab [a.k.a. Labib] and the other RCD-government supporters by "dictatorship of the people", in reality an oxymoron, most likely mean a form of ochlarchy, the opposite of anarchy. Anarchy is real democracy including optimal order - not chaos. The present situation and system in Tunisia, a) with a.o.t. an autocratic self-appointed so called "unity" government, corruption, curfew, teargas, shooting and violent attacks on mainly peaceful, non-ochlarchical, anti-government protesters by the authorities, b) lead by the ultra-fascist RCD (including former RCD) rulers, c) are in reality very, very authoritarian and thus far from anarchy. It is the RCD (including former RCD) rulers in the so called "unity" interim government that stands for ochlarchy, including chaos.

The typical fascist tactic of creating chaos (ochlarchy = mob rule broadly defined), falsely naming it "anarchy", and support for the "strong man", in this case the present interim PM; and a totalitarian arch/archy, here the extremist RCD-rulers, to do away with the "anarchy", is internationally well known. This tactic is just an extension of the very frequent Orwellian "1984" Big Brother type newspeak calling ochlarchy falsely "anarchy" to support archy in general, i.e. x-archy, where x can be anything but not 'an'; in itself an ultra-authoritarian tendency of newsmedia, etc, mentioned in the Oslo Convention. Anarchy is not ochlarchy, but real democracy. Also France24 gets a Brown Card for publishing the authoritarian nonsense of Doctor Labib, according to the Oslo Convention.

The IAT-APT supports a) trials of suspected criminals of former RCDs included the interim PM and president, inspired by the Nuremberg-trials and the International Criminal Cort (ICC), b) the International Institute for Organization Research's (IIFOR) proposals for a new The people's interim cabinet etc, and continued direct actions against the so called "unity" government, i.e. without ochlarchy.

Cosmetic change in the government. According to France 24, a cosmetic change of the interim cabinet will be announced on Wednesday, mainly to fill posts vacated by five resignations over the past week. Some provincial governors will also be replaced, but the government remains dominated by former RCD members. The protests will continue...

Interpol! Arrest the ultra-fascist suspected criminal interim ruler Mohammed Ghannouchi! Tunisia announced that it is seeking Interpol's help to arrest ousted President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, his wife and several of his relatives. However it is difficult to imagine Saudi Arabia, which just welcomed the president and his family, all of a sudden arresting them. Arrest of exiled dictators is in general rare. Interpol should rather arrest the ultra-fascist suspected criminal interim Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi, as well as the interim president and the other former RCDs in the present "caretaker" government.

The protests against the autocratic self-appointed ultra-fascist Ghannouchi-government continued. Thousands marched through Tunisia's second biggest city, Sfax, in an anti-government demonstration timed to coincide with the general strike called by the main UGTT trade union. However riot police fired tear gas at protesters who have swarmed central Tunis - near the ultra-fascist interim PM's office - over the past four days. A gang of ochlarchists had been hurling bottles and stones at the police. The IAT-APT condemned the provocateurs and ochlarchists hurling bottles and stones against the police, and called for continued direct actions against the so called "unity" government, i.e. without ochlarchy. IAT-APT also called on the Tunisian police to be less 'trigger happy' with the tear gas. "Police and the military should in general be less 'trigger happy'," IAT-APT declared, also mentioning "members of the ultra-fascist violent vigilantes of the RCD are probably still around...".

Meanwhile police fought with thousands of Egyptians who defied a government ban on Wednesday to protest against President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule, firing rubber bullets and tear gas and dragging away demonstrators. Several hundred protesters were arrested.

ITUC sent AIIS a press release today, stating: Tunisia - ITUC Calls for End to Attacks on UGTT. The offices of the UGTT in six Tunisian towns have been attacked. The ITUC is launching an appeal for an immediate end to the violence against the UGTT. "These physical attacks and the climate of intimidation are inadmissible. At a time when Tunisia is not only full of hope but also full of uncertainty, the UGTT stands as an undisputable force of stability and progress for the future of Tunisian society," said ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow. "The international trade union movement once again reaffirms its support for its Tunisian affiliate, the UGTT, which played a key and essential role in the mass revolt that brought down the dictatorship in Tunisia." The ITUC is preparing to file an appeal with the ILO concerning the violent practices deployed in total breach of trade union rights and freedoms.

The situation in the evening: The new strongman PM Mohammed Ghannouchi of ex-RCD and most of the old RCD, has probably given his orders to his provocateurs and UGTT is violently attacked. The 'anarchy' = ochlarchy card is played... The military shoots so far in the air and the police so far mainly use tear gas against the people. What is next?

More about the cosmetic change in the government late Wednesday. The state news agency TAP, citing a government spokesman late Wednesday, said officials planned to announce changes to the lineup of ministers on Thursday. The "caretaker" government as mentioned includes some former opposition leaders, but many top posts - including prime minister and the ministers of defense, foreign affairs and the interior - were retained by Ben Ali cronies. Demonstrators want those old-guard rulers out. The interim government also eased back on its nightly curfew, now setting it at 10 p.m. to 4 a.m., TAP reported.

27.01.2011. Tunisia's foreign minister resigns amid protests. Tunisia's foreign minister  Kamel Morjane announced his resignation Thursday, state media, i.e. the TAP news agency, reported. Protesters have complained bitterly about corruption, lack of jobs and general repression and exploitation, and want to oust all cronies of deposed former President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali from the government, including the interim PM and president.

Meanwhile, tens of thousands of people are calling for the Yemeni president's ouster in protests across the capital inspired by the popular revolt in Tunisia. "We will not accept anything less than the president leaving," said independent parliamentarian Ahmed Hashid. Opposition leaders called for more demonstrations on Friday.

Tens of thousands of demonstrators have filled the streets of Cairo and other parts of Egypt in the largest anti-government protests in years. Demonstrators are calling for Mubarak's ouster after 30 years in power. The rallies will probably continue on Friday, the start of the weekend in much of the Arab world. Nobel peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei is expected to take part in rallies in Cairo on Friday, according to his spokesman. His presence could, if not further galvanize the demonstrators, at least place at thont an internationally respected diplomat - a move that could further force the government's hand.

Later Thursday: Some change in the Tunisian government - but not enough! Tunisian interim so called "unity" government ditched some more loyalists to its ousted president, but the ultra-fascist new strongman (of ex-RCD plus most of the old RCD), Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi insisted on retaining his job. 12 ministers would be replaced including the interior and defense ministers, and as mentioned the foreign minister. "This government is a transitional, interim government that will remain until it completes its mission of taking the country to democracy," Ghannouchi insisted in a live television address. The purge is unlikely to quell protests in Tunisia.

After the prime minister's television address, chants of "bread, water but no Ghannouchi" broke out among protesters who had launched a sit-in outside his office to demand he resign. "We reject Ghannouchi totally. We were surprised to see him announce the government," said protester Mohammed Fadel. "Since he did not fight corruption under Ben Ali, he is an accomplice." Earlier on Thursday, thousands of demonstrators thronged Bourguiba Avenue, the main boulevard in the capital Tunis, demanding that the government resign. They also broke through police lines outside the prime minister's office, where hundreds of demonstrators had pledged to camp out until the government resigned. The purge replaced members of Ben Ali's former ruling RCD party with ministers who Ghannouchi said were chosen for their high levels of experience and qualifications. The UGTT labor union will not join the new interim government, but was somewhat positive to the new line up.

"This is a small step in the right direction, but not enough. We a) call for trials of suspected criminals of former RCDs included the interim PM and president, inspired by the Nuremberg-trials and the International Criminal Cort (ICC), b) support the International Institute for Organization Research's (IIFOR) proposals for a new The people's interim cabinet etc. of 24.01.2011 (se report above), and c) call for continued direct actions against the so called "unity" government, i.e. without ochlarchy. The ultra-fascist new strongman Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, must go!" the Anarchist International - AI/IFA, the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA, the International Workers of the World (IWW) and the World Economic Council declared in a joint statement.

28.01.2011. Thousands of protesters in Tunisia demand "Ghannouchi OUT!" and mainly support IIFOR's proposals for a new The people's interim cabinet!

The new so called "unity cabinet" includes 12 new ministers and nine holdovers from the prior interim government that had been named on Jan. 17, in addition to the ultra-fascist new strongman Ghannouchi. The newcomers include Interior Minister Farhat Rajhi, Defense Minister Abdelkrim Zbidi, and Foreign Affairs Minister Ahmed Ounaies. Only three ministers in the government named Thursday have official roots in Ben Ali's RCD party, compared to 10 in the previous interim cabinet. But many people question how independent the newcomers really are? Earlier Thursday the main UGTT union announced it would refuse to join the interim cabinet, saying it preferred to remain as an opposition force force outside the government.

Thousands of protesters in Tunisia continue direct actions and demand a.o.t. "Ghannouchi OUT!", and mainly support IIFOR's proposals for a new The people's interim cabinet of 24.01.2011 (se report above)! Since Ben Ali was forced to flee on January 14 in the face of unrest over poverty and severe economical and political repression in general, protesters have a.o.t. been gathering in Tunis to demand a new interim government without Ben Ali loyalists. On Friday police stormed a camp where many have been holding a round-the clock sit-in for the past five days, and thus the police clearly acted against human rights. A few provocateurs and ochlarchists among the protesters threw stones at police, who fired tear gas to disperse the protesters. Saifeddine Missraoui, a student, took a hard line: "We are not leaving here until Ghannouchi leaves and we get a brand new government," he said, according to Reuters. Many said they would not go until Ghannouchi did.

The IAT-APT called for respect for human rights, but condemned the provocateurs and ochlarchists hurling stones against the police. IAT-APT also called on the Tunisian police to be less 'trigger happy' with the tear gas. "Police and the military should in general be less 'trigger happy'," IAT-APT declared, also mentioning "members of the ultra-fascist violent vigilantes of the RCD are probably still around...".

Also a few islamists demonstrated on Friday. Some carried placards reading: "We want freedom for the hijab, the niqab and the beard." Under Ben Ali's rule, women who covered their hair by wearing the hijab, in the Muslim tradition, were denied jobs or education. Men with long beards were stopped by police. "We demand the revision of the terrorism law ... and say no to the war on the niqab," one woman told Reuters TV, her face entirely covered by a black veil, or niqab. islamists played no visible part in the "Jasmine Revolution" that toppled Ben Ali, but when the Ennahda, the country's largest islamist movement, was allowed to contest elections in 1989, it came second to the ruling party. The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA declared: "The struggle against islamist jihad-terrorism in Tunisia and in general must continue, as outlined in the resolutions of The International Conference On Terrorism (ICOT)- IJA 4 (31)!" .

Tunisia's uprising has as mentioned electrified Arabs across the Middle East and North Africa, where many countries share the complaints of poor living standards and totalitarian rule. Inspired by Tunisia's example, tens of thousands of Egyptians have taken to the streets, also today, to demand an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year rule. Tunisians protested outside the Egyptian embassy in Tunis, calling for the overthrow of Mubarak and other Arab leaders. "Hosni Mubarak must fall," some protesters chanted. "Hosni Mubarak, Saudi Arabia awaits," others said... In Brussels, diplomats said European Union foreign ministers were expected to agree on Monday to freeze Ben Ali's assets and offer Tunisia better trade terms.

"This new interim cabinet is a small step in the right direction, but not enough. We a) call for trials of i) suspected criminals of former RCDs, included ii) the interim PM and president, and also iii) of suspected criminals among the police, inspired by the Nuremberg-trials and the International Criminal Cort (ICC), b) support the International Institute for Organization Research's (IIFOR) proposals for a new The people's interim cabinet etc. of 24.01.2011 (se report above), and c) call for continued direct actions against the so called 'unity cabinet', i.e. without ochlarchy. The ultra-fascist new strongman Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, must go! The protests against the autocratic self-appointed ultra-fascist Ghannouchi-government will continue!!" the Anarchist International - AI/IFA, the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA, the International Workers of the World (IWW), the International Anarchist Tribunal - IAT-APT and the World Economic Council declared in a joint statement.

"Day of Rage" in Egypt - more anti-government protests. Egypt's President Mubarak imposes overnight curfew throughout all areas of country, state-run Nile TV reports, as the Egyptian government battles to restore control after the biggest protests so far. But live television pictures from Cairo continue to show large crowds on the streets. Across the country tens of thousands of protesters turned out after Friday prayers and clashed with police. President Hosni Mubarak, facing the biggest challenge to his authority of his 31 years in power, has ordered the army onto the streets of Cairo. The Egyptian opposition's main spokesperson Mohamed ElBaradei is placed under house arrest, according CNN.

Flames have been seen from the area around the headquarters of the governing National Democratic Party (NDP) in Cairo. Army vehicles have also been seen on the streets of Cairo. In one location, an army vehicle appeared to go into reverse when it was surrounded by protesters who raised their fists in celebration... The protesters on the street are so many, that even if the security forces are using ordinary bullets at large, it will probably not stop the protests -- and very likely only contribute to bring the government and the totalitarian rule down!!!

Later: Egypt's President Mubarak clings on to totalitarian power with lukewarm support from Obama. Wrong move from both. The protests will most likely continue until Mubarak resigns, and USA will be a loser on the wrong side of history... "In a speech Friday night Egypt's President Mubarak expressed he would change his cabinet, but clings on to totalitarian power, showing he will continue as top ruler and president, and not stepping down. US President Obamma in a speech soon afterwards talked loosely about human rights, and gave lukewarm support to Egypt's President Mubarak, and Obama gave no clear support for the Egyptian people as opposed to Mubarak. The protests will most likely continue until Mubarak resigns, and USA will be a loser on the wrong side of history. A joker in Egypt is the military," a spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said to AIIS.

The mass protests continue... Soon after Mubarak's speech, lots of demonstrators returned to the streets and the mass protests continue... despite an overnight curfew, which is not according to human rights. The Egyptian police ochlarchy on orders from Mubarak will probably continue, but most likely in vain! Later in the night somewhat less people participated in the mass protests, but more people will probably be on the streets tomorrow, although perhaps somewhat less than on Friday. There are no signs so far that the military will turn against the people.

29.01.2011. The mass protests in Egypt continue... Yesterday the protesting people were able to repel a lot of the ochlarchical police, which may be seen as a victory, and the army did not attack the people. Saturday the mass protests on the streets continue, guarded by the military. The main parole is "Mubarak out!". "Demonstrate with dignity, not ochlarchy!!!" a spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said to AIIS, adding "the loss of life is regrettable."

Ochlarchy - not Anarchy in Cairo. Brown Card to Mubarak's "useful idiot" the BBC's Lyse Doucet. Anarchy is not ochlarchy including chaos, but real democracy including optimal order! Ochlarchy including chaos is the situation in parts of Cairo -- not anarchy -- as BBC's Lyse Doucet suggests, getting a Brown Card from the International Anarchist Tribunal - IAT-APT, according to the Oslo Convention. The BBC's Lyse Doucet says:" ... there is a situation of anarchy, with police stations ransacked and looted, and weapons stolen..." Ochlarchy including chaos, is not anarchy, which includes optimal order. Anarchy is not ochlarchy, but real democracy. De facto: ochlarchy (mob rule) and anarchy are opposites as war and peace. To say de facto ochlarchy is anarchy is a lie equal to war is peace, i.e. Orwellian "1984" newspeak type lies. And it has similar authoritarian, repressive, functions as Big Brother in "1984".

The typical fascist tactic of creating chaos (ochlarchy = mob rule broadly defined), falsely naming it "anarchy", and de facto support for the "strong man", in this case Egypt's President Mubarak and his totalitarian archs/archy to do away with the "anarchy", is internationally well known. This tactic is just an extension of the very frequent Orwellian "1984" Big Brother type newspeak calling ochlarchy falsely "anarchy" to support archy in general, i.e. x-archy, where x can be anything but not 'an'; in itself an ultra-authoritarian tendency of newsmedia, etc, stated in the Oslo Convention. Anarchy is as mentioned not ochlarchy including chaos, but real democracy including optimal order. BBC's Lyse Doucet plays the role of Mubarak's "useful idiot", remember Lenin. The International Anarchist Tribunal - IAT-APT calls on the newsmedia to "Stop acting as "useful idiots" of Egypt's President Mubarak and his totalitarian archs/archy. To the armed corps and in general: Do away with the ochlarchy - stop and arrest the ochlarchists! For a development towards anarchy in Egypt!! Do it NOW!!!"

An urgent program and organization in Egypt. "Food for the poor". "Food is urgently needed for the very poor in Egypt. They are starving. The poor people's looting is used as an excuse for continued totalitarian rule. To do away with the ochlarchy including looting a "Food for the poor" program and organization should be established as soon as possible. Say, the military may take an initial managing and practical role in organizing food collection and distribution together with other charity organizations and interested groups in Egypt and world wide. Food from the military emergency stocks may be used as a start!" a spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said to AIIS.

As small a start of "Food for the poor" the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA have started a joint action with the Arabic section of Food Not Bombs (FNB), with Website http://www.foodnotbombs.net/arabic.html. FNB has been communicating with Egyptian activists for some time. Please forward this website to all those you know in Egypt and others that may join in. Thanks! Best regards, Keith for FNB and Anna Q. for AI & ACA.

Meanwhile in Tunisia thousands of protesters continued to demand "Ghannouchi OUT!" and mainly supported IIFOR's proposals for a new The people's interim cabinet! A few fascist supporters of the ultra-fascist Ghannouchi-government armed with sticks tried to attack the anti-government protesters, but was repelled. It was also a demonstration for women's rights.

"We a) call for trials of i) suspected criminals of former RCDs, included ii) the interim PM Ghannouchi and the president, and also iii) of suspected criminals among the police, inspired by the Nuremberg-trials and the International Criminal Cort (ICC), b) support the International Institute for Organization Research's (IIFOR) proposals for a new The people's interim cabinet etc. of 24.01.2011 (se report above), and c) call for continued direct actions against the so called 'unity cabinet', i.e. without ochlarchy. The ultra-fascist new strongman Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, must go! The protests against the autocratic self-appointed ultra-fascist Ghannouchi-government will continue!!" the Anarchist International - AI/IFA, the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA, the International Workers of the World (IWW), the International Anarchist Tribunal - IAT-APT and the World Economic Council declared in a joint statement.

30.01.2011. The mass protests in Egypt continue. Tens of thousands are on the streets... The main spokesperson of the opposition, Mohammed ElBaradei, has renewed his call for President Mubarak to step down. The nomination of a vice-president and a prime minister is not sufficient, he added, calling on the army to protect the people: "The Egyptian people will remember who stood by them and who stood by the [totalitarian] regime when it falls," he said in a speech. By the way, CNN's report about ElBaradei in house arrest was false.

At noon a coalition of opposition groups issue a statement asking Mohamed ElBaradei to form a transitional government. They call on the Nobel Laureate "during this transitional stage, to act in the internal and external affairs of the nation, and to form a temporary government… and to dissolve parliament and draft a new constitution which enables the Egyptian people to freely choose its representatives in parliament and elect a legitimate president." The statement was signed by the 6 April Movement, the We are all Khalid Said Movement, the National Assembly for Change and the 25 January Movement.

With ongoing skirmishes between looters and private home defense groups, several hundred escaped convicts reportedly on the run, and a complete absence of police on Egypt's streets, the situation remains precarious. The military is however very present and at large so far supporting the people. Sunday is the sixth day of protests against Hosni Mubarak's totalitarian regime, which is seemingly teetering on the brink of collapse. However the reports about looting and ochlarchy in general seem to be exaggerated, in an attempt by the Mubarak-regime to create support for a continued totalitarian police state.

Human Rights Watch says that looting is becoming a real problem in Alexandria. Peter Bouckaert, the organization's emergencies director, tells the BBC that some of it was a deliberate attempt by the authorities to frighten people: "Some of [the looters] are criminals who've been released from the prisons and we have confirmed reports that some of the looters are actually undercover policemen. So we're not quite sure how much of this is spontaneous and how much of it is an organized attempt by the government to create instability now."

Egyptian state TV broadcasts footage of dozens of prisoners escaping and being recaptured by the military. The prisoners are shown seated on the floor, many of them with their hands tied behind their backs. The newsreader also announces that the army has arrested 450 rioters in different parts of the country. The station also shows footage of confiscated rifles, AK-47 assault rifles, Molotov cocktails, ammunition, and knives, which the announcer says were to be used by "criminals to terrorise the public".

In the early afternoon there are reports of renewed military activity in central Cairo: two Egyptian jets are repeatedly buzzing Tahrir Square, a helicopter is hovering nearby and a column of tanks has arrived. Soon after protesters have painted a "Down with Mubarak" slogan in the midst of Tahrir Square.

Meanwhile, in what appear to be some of the strongest US comments yet on the situation in Egypt, Mrs Clinton has called for "an orderly transition", according to BBC. Mr ElBaradei commented: "It is loud and clear from everybody in Egypt that Mubarak has to leave today," according to CNN: "He needs to leave today... to be followed by a smooth transition [to] a national unity government to be followed by all the measures set in place for a free and fair election." The AFP news agency reported the former UN nuclear chief saying, the US is "losing credibility by the day" by supporting the Mubarak regime.

In the afteroon there are reports about food shortages and people are worried about looting and about the availability of supplies in general. The "Food for the poor" program and organization in Egypt, see the report of 29.01.2011, may be mentioned in this connection.

Mohamed ElBaradei joined the protesters in Tahrir Square and held a speech, speaking via a megaphone. According to Reuters he said: "You have taken back your rights and what we have begun cannot go back. We have one main demand - the end of the [totalitarian] regime and the beginning of a new stage, [towards] a new Egypt. I bow to the people of Egypt in respect. I ask of you patience, change is coming in the next few days." He also tweeted: "We shall continue to exercise our right of peaceful demonstration and restore our freedom & dignity. Regime violence will backfire badly".

Egyptian state TV showed footage of President Hosni Mubarak meeting with new Vice-President Omar Suleiman and the new Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq. The meeting was to "set the priorities of the new government", the broadcaster reported.

In the evening the police, having been off the streets for most of Sunday, returned. Will this mean more police ochlarchy or real law and order? BBC reported that dozens of judges joined the protesters in Tahrir Square on Sunday. One of them, Hosam Makawi, accused the police of corruption and of destroying incriminating evidence, i.e. ochlarchy... Egypt's authorities order the curfew in Cairo, Alexandria and Suez to be extended from 1500 to 0800 local time (1300 - 0600 GMT), state TV reported. A tweet with wry humour: "The only Egyptian citizen obeying the curfew is Hosni Mubarak," was quoted by BBC. Another tweet on the policing situation in the capital was: "Yesterday the intersections were being organized by civilian volunteers. Today? Volunteers AND uniformed police officers together."

Egyptian opposition politician Ayman Nour -- an opponent of Hosni Mubarak who spent over three years in jail -- says he and his allies have agreed to co-operate with Mohamed ElBaradei and the movement against Hosni Mubarak. Negotiations will not be conducted with the government but with the army. They will push the army to try and help them in their cause, he says, according to BBC. Howeer the BBC's Jim Muir, in Tahrir Square, said there was no sense that Mohamed ElBaradei was being carried along on a wave of euphoria on his entry to the square... Some of the people in the square saw him and heard him speak, but by no means all, BBC's correspondent reported.

At midnight a spokesperson for the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and the Egyptian section of the Anarchist Confederation of Africa - ACA said to AIIS: "It's difficult to know how things will turn out in Cairo and Egypt in general. Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters will very likely be back on the streets tomorrow, and there seems little likelihood of a deal between Hosni Mubarak and the people. Mubarak's plan now is probably to depend on people getting tired and hungry for food and security. Our plan is to survive. We're younger." Meanwhile private home defense groups is back to protect against ochlarchy.

There have also been reports of continued protests on Sunday in Tunisia, Jordan and Yemen, and now also Sudan...

31.01.2011. Egypt's anti-government protesters step up pressure. In brief:

The joker - the military - what's next? The International Institute for Organization Research (IIFOR) declares: "The joker - the military - what's next? The Egyptian military is now facing the biggest dilemma. There are many reports that especially the rank and files mainly are supporting the people. But today there are also reports that the military has shot live ammunition in the air, to frighten demonstrators. Should the Egyptian military, i.e. mainly the generals, continue to support their clearly unpopular president, or urge him to step down as Tunisia's military did with their president earlier this month? Clearly, the street protests have not yet reached the tipping point where senior military officers withdraw that vital support, even if some units have been allowing protesters to draw graffiti on their vehicles calling for the president's removal.

Featuring prominently in their calculations will probably be the annual military subsidy from Washington, totalling about $1.3bn. Thus, USA is also a joker in this game!!! The Egyptian military know that the US's military subsidy would probably be withdrawn if their country moved to an islamist government so there will most likely be many who want to preserve something of a status quo, at least regarding islamists. However the situation in Iran is not popular in Egypt, and will probably be rejected by a clear majority of the population in free and fair elections. The struggle against islamist jihad-terrorism in Egypt and in general must continue, as outlined in the resolutions of The International Conference On Terrorism (ICOT)- IJA 4 (31), i.e. based on human rights.

USA's signals are so far somewhat unclear, but probably US officials seem to have in mind a managed orderly transition that avoids the creation of an economic-political vacuum that extremist elements might exploit. This could mean the creation of a caretaker new interim government that oversees the rewriting of the constitution and the holding of free and fair elections, i.e. a constitutional referendum, and general and local elections. We see this as a reasonable solution in the short run.

It is clear that Mubarak must go, the sooner the better. We are for a peaceful solution. We believe dialogue is the way for Egypt to achieve changes that address at the same time the challenge of a development towards democracy and the challenge of stability. We believe that the freedom of expression and the right to assemble peacefully, and non-ochlarchical -- and based on human rights, should be respected by the authorities. Demonstrations should not be repressed by force. At the same time, we hope that demonstrators behave responsibly and refrain from any use of violence, act non-ochlarchical!

The military probably holds Egypt's future in its hands, as it has for almost 60 years - ever since Gamal Abdul Nasser led a military coup against the monarchy in 1952. In the 1973 war against Israel, the army crossed the Suez Canal and captured territory held by Israel - an achievement that Egypt is still immensely proud of. Today, the army is the 10th biggest in the world. President Mubarak has made its commanders rich and powerful, but now they seem anxious to shift away from him. The true test for the military may yet be to come. And that is if the street protests grow out of control and Egypt's largely popular military are ordered to open fire on their own people, a nightmare scenario for government and protesters alike.

The announcement by the Egyptian army on the evening 31.01.2011 that it will not use force against their own people, and that it considers the demands of the protesters "legitimate", could be a devastating blow to President Mubarak. To regain control of the streets, he would need the use -- or at least the threat -- of force from the army. It comes after a call by the opposition for a million-strong demonstration on Tuesday in central Cairo. It now seems increasingly likely that the 30-year rule of Mr Mubarak is drawing to a close... The regime is probably waiting to see how many people actually turn up to the protests tomorrow, and if around a million or more appear, as the organizers are hoping, something will have to give... Our best advice to the Egyptian generals is to follow Tunisia's example as soon as possible!!"

01.02.2011. The largest anti-government protest in Egypt so far. Hundreds of thousands protesters are in the streets! In brief:

More about the Egyptian army's antimilitarist statement. Yesterday, in a move likely to embolden protesters demanding the overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian army vowed not to use force against the people. BBC has translated and published the full text of the statement relayed by an army spokesman on 31 January 2011, quoting:

Your Armed Forces acknowledges the legitimacy of the people's demands and is adamant on carrying out its responsibilities in protecting the country and its citizens as ever.

We stress the following:

1. Peaceful freedom of expression is guaranteed for everyone.

2. [No-one] shall carry out an action that could endanger the country's safety and security or vandalise public and private property.

3. It is not acceptable that some outlaws have terrorised citizens. The Armed Forces will not allow it. It will not allow the safety and security of the country to be tampered with.

4. [To citizens] Keep safe the assets and capabilities of your great people. Resist any vandalism against public or private property.

5. The Armed Forces is aware of the legitimate demands of the honourable citizens.

6. The Armed Forces' presence on the Egyptian streets is for your own sake, safety and security. Your Armed Forces have not and will not resort to the use of force against this great people.

02.02.2011. The large anti-government protests in Egypt continue. Ultra-fascist pro-Mubarak ochlarchists are attacking anti-government protesters, creating chaos. In brief:

Ochlarchy - not Anarchy in Cairo. Brown Card to Mubarak's "useful idiot" the CNN. Anarchy is not ochlarchy including chaos, but real democracy including optimal order! Ochlarchy including chaos is the situation in parts of Cairo -- not anarchy -- as CNN suggests, getting a Brown Card from the International Anarchist Tribunal - IAT-APT, according to the Oslo Convention. CNN-TV is falsely calling the present ochlarchy, incuding chaos made by ultra-fascist pro-Mubarak ochlarchists in Cairo, anarchy. Ochlarchy including chaos, is not anarchy, which includes optimal order. Anarchy is not ochlarchy, but real democracy. De facto: ochlarchy (mob rule) and anarchy are opposites as war and peace. To say de facto ochlarchy is anarchy is a lie equal to war is peace, i.e. Orwellian "1984" newspeak type lies. And it has similar authoritarian, repressive, functions as Big Brother in "1984".

The typical fascist tactic of creating chaos (ochlarchy = mob rule broadly defined), falsely naming it "anarchy", and de facto support for the "strong man", in this case Egypt's President Mubarak and his totalitarian archs/archy to do away with the "anarchy", is internationally well known. This tactic is just an extension of the very frequent Orwellian "1984" Big Brother type newspeak calling ochlarchy falsely "anarchy" to support archy in general, i.e. x-archy, where x can be anything but not 'an'; in itself an ultra-authoritarian tendency of newsmedia, etc, stated in the Oslo Convention. Anarchy is as mentioned not ochlarchy including chaos, but real democracy including optimal order. CNN plays the role of Mubarak's "useful idiot", remember Lenin. The International Anarchist Tribunal - IAT-APT calls on the newsmedia to "Stop acting as "useful idiots" of Egypt's President Mubarak and his totalitarian archs/archy. To the armed corps and in general: Do away with the ochlarchy - stop and arrest the ochlarchists! For a development towards anarchy in Egypt!! Do it NOW!!!"

03.02.2011. Ad ochlarchy in Cairo. Warning: The people of Egypt and the World hold Mubarak responible for the ochlarchy, including deadly! Stop the ochlarchy!! In brief:

04.02.2011. "Friday of Departure"- Warning: The people of Egypt and the World hold Mubarak responible for any significant ochlarchy, including deadly! Stop the ochlarchy!! In brief:

05.02.2011. The mass protests continue, but smaller than Friday. Analysis: the present economic-political situation. No revolution so far, just an uprising - a popular revolt! In brief:

The demonstrations in Tunisia against the representation and influence of the 'old guard' in the interim government have continued, and the situation is still tense. A police chief, Khaled Ghazouani, in the north-western town of Kef, was arrested after his officers opened fire at protesters and several were killed.

06.02.2011. The mass protests continue. A united People's Front against the divide and rule policy of the Mubarak-regime - for a steady and orderly development towards real democracy in Egypt. In brief:

07.02.2011. The mass protests continue. Slowly towards a more firm organization of the now informal united People's Front - for a steady and orderly development towards real democracy in Egypt no 1. In brief:

08.02.2011. The mass protests continue. A major anti-Mubarak day, with large domestic and international anti-government direct actions. Mubarak behind closed doors... In brief:

09.02.2011. The mass uprising is spreading. No significant constructive from Mubarak and the vice president so far. Strange considering their weak position. In brief:

10.02.2011. While the people's uprising is spreading and increasing some generals of the vast Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) comment the Egyptian poker game, especially the pair of knights Mubarak and his henchman Suleiman... In brief:

11.02.2011.While peaceful mass protests are increasing, the generals, including Mubarak's henchmen and the partly criminal military police, are wondering what to do... In brief:

Mr. Mubarak, an 82-year-old former air force commander, left without comment for his home by the Red Sea in Sharm el Sheik. His departure overturns, after six decades, the Arab world's original secular dictatorship. He was toppled by a radically new force in regional politics — a largely secular, nonviolent, youth-led democracy movement that brought Egypt's leftist, libertarian, liberal/liberalist and islamist opposition groups together for the first time under its banner, i.e. a de facto informal united People's Front, as suggested by the anarchists, although formally nameless.

One by one the protesters, i.e. the united People's Front, withstood each weapon in the arsenal of the Egyptian autocracy — first the heavily armed riot police, then a ruling party militia and finally the state's powerful propaganda machine.

Mr. Mubarak's fall removed a bulwark of American foreign policy in the region. The United States, its Arab allies and Israel are now pondering whether the Egyptian military, which has a.o.t. vowed to hold free elections, will give way to a new era of democratic dynamism or to a perilous lurch into instability or islamist rule.

The upheaval comes less than a month after a sudden youth revolt in nearby Tunisia toppled another enduring Arab strongman, President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. And on Friday night some of the revelers celebrating in the streets of Cairo marched under a Tunisian flag and pointed to the surviving autocracies in Syria, Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Yemen. "We are setting a role model for the dictatorships around us," said Khalid Shaheen, 39. "Democracy is coming." "We can breathe fresh air, we can feel our freedom," said Gamal Heshamt, a former independent member of Parliament. "After 30 years of absence from the world, Egypt is back."

President Obama, in a televised address, praised the Egyptian revolution. "Egyptians have made it clear that nothing less than genuine democracy will carry the day," he said. "It was the moral force of nonviolence — not terrorism and mindless killing — that bent the arc of history toward justice once more."

The Muslim Brotherhood, the outlawed islamist movement that until 18 days ago was considered Egypt's only viable opposition, said it was merely a supporting player in the revolt. "We participated with everyone else and did not lead this or raise islamic slogans so that it can be the revolution of everyone," said Mohamed Saad el-Katatni, a spokesman for the Brotherhood. "This is a revolution for all Egyptians; there is no room for a single group's slogans, not the Brotherhood's or anybody else." The Brotherhood, which was slow to follow the lead of its own youth wing into the streets, has said it will not field a candidate for president or seek a parliamentary majority in the expected elections.

The Mubarak era ended without any of the stability and predictability that were the hallmarks of his tenure. USA and some Egyptian officials had expected Mr. Mubarak to leave office on Thursday and irrevocably delegate his authority to Vice President Suleiman.

But whether because of pride or stubbornness, Mr. Mubarak instead spoke once again as the unbowed "father of the nation", barely alluding to a vague "delegation" of authority. The resulting disappointment enraged the Egyptian public, sent a million people into the streets of Cairo on Friday morning and put in motion an unceremonious retreat at the behest of the military he had commanded for so long. "Taking into consideration the difficult circumstances the country is going through, President Mohammed Hosni Mubarak has decided to leave the post of president of the republic and has tasked the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces [a.k.a. the Military High Council], to manage the state's affairs," Mr. Suleiman, grave and ashen, said in a brief televised statement.

Standing guard near the presidential palace, soldiers passed photographs of "martyrs" killed during the revolution through barbed wire to attach them to their tanks. At Tahrir Square, some slipped out of position to join the roaring crowds flooding the streets.

Whether the military will subordinate itself to a civilian democracy or install a new military dictator will be impossible to know for months. Military leaders will inevitably face pressure to deliver the genuine transition that protesters did not trust Mr. Mubarak to give them. Yet it may also seek to protect the enormous political and economic privileges it accumulated during Mr. Mubarak's reign. And the army has itself been infused for years with the notion that Egypt's survival depends on fighting threats, real and imagined, from foreign enemies, islamists, Iran and the frustrations of its own people.

Throughout the revolt, the army stood mainly passively on the sidelines — its soldiers literally standing behind the iron fence of the Egyptian Museum — as the police or armed Mubarak loyalists fought the protesters centered in Tahrir Square. But Western diplomats, speaking on the condition of anonymity because they were violating confidences, said that top army officials had told them that their troops would never use force against civilians, depriving Mr. Mubarak of a decisive tool to suppress the dissent. It has been "increasingly clear," a Western diplomat said Friday, that "the army will not go down with Mubarak."

Now the military, which owns vast commercial interests here but has not fought in decades, must keep order and rebuild a shattered economy and security forces. Its top official, Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, 75, served for decades as a top official of Mr. Mubarak's government. And its top uniformed official, Gen. Sami Hafez Enan, hasso far not spoken publicly.

Egypt's opposition has said for weeks that it welcomed a military role in securing the country, ideally under a three-member, or two- to five-member, presidential council with only one military member, compatible with the anarchists' advice.

The initial reaction to the military takeover was positive by many, but others were more skeptical, among them some libertarians -- fearing a possible military dictatorship. However "welcome back," said Wael Ghonim, the Google executive who administered the Facebook group that helped start the revolt. Mr. Ghonim, who was detained for 12 days in blindfolded isolation by the Mubarak government as it tried to stamp out the revolt, helped protesters turn the tide in a propaganda war against the state media earlier this week, when he described his captivity in an emotional interview on a satellite television station. "Egypt is going to be a democratic state [i.e. in the meaning of country]," he declared Friday, in another interview. "You will be impressed."

The opposition groups participating in the protest movement had previously settled on a committee with Mohamed ElBaradei as primus moter, the former diplomat and Nobel laureate, to negotiate with the army if Mr. Mubarak resigned, mainly compatible with the anarchists' advice. In a television interview he indicated that he expected the talks with the military to begin within days. "I'd like to see that started tomorrow so we can have a sharing of power, the civilian and the military, and tell them what our demands are, what they need to do," he said. By evening, Egyptian politicians were beginning to position themselves to run for office. Amr Moussa, one of the country's most popular public figures, resigned his position as secretary general of the Arab League, and an aide, Hesham Youssef, confirmed that Mr. Moussa was considering seeking office. Both Amr Moussa and Mohamed ElBaradei were suggested earlier by the anarchists as candidates to an interim civil caretaker cabinet or council.

Thus the informal united People's Front is now moving towards a more firmly organized united People's Front, as suggested by the anarchists.

In the military's final communiqué of the day, its spokesman thanked Mr. Mubarak for his service and saluted the "martyrs" of the revolution. In Tahrir Square, protesters said they were not quite ready to disband the little republic they had built up during their two-week occupation, setting up makeshift clinics, soundstages, a detention center and security teams to protect the barricades. Many have boasted that their encampment was a rare example of community spirit here, and after Mr. Mubarak's resignation the organizers called on the thousands who protested here to return once again on Saturday morning to help clean it up.

12.02.2011. A development towards real democracy by the people via organization, dialog and elections. Election of significant rulers is not real democracy. Report by Associated Press. Anarchist comments.

Saturday was the real start of the Egyptian revolution, i.e. a development of the country's system towards real democracy. Yesterday the anarchists declared:

Mubarak was toppled Friday by a radically new force in Egyptian and regional politics — a largely secular, nonviolent, youth-led democracy movement that brought Egypt's leftist, libertarian, liberal/liberalist and islamist opposition groups together for the first time under its banner, i.e. a de facto informal united People's Front, as suggested by the anarchists, although formally nameless.

The opposition groups participating in the protest movement had as mentioned previously settled on a committee with Mohamed ElBaradei as primus motor, the former diplomat and Nobel laureate, to negotiate with the army if Mr. Mubarak resigned, mainly compatible with the anarchists' advice. In a television interview Friday he indicated that he expected the talks with the military to begin within days. "I'd like to see that started tomorrow so we can have a sharing of power, the civilian and the military, and tell them what our demands are, what they need to do," he said. Egypt's opposition has said for weeks that it welcomed a military role in securing the country, ideally under a three-member, or two- to five-member, presidential council with only one military member, compatible with the anarchists' advice.

By evening, Egyptian politicians were beginning to position themselves to run for office. Amr Moussa, one of the country's most popular public figures, resigned his position as secretary general of the Arab League, and an aide, Hesham Youssef, confirmed that Mr. Moussa was considering seeking office. Both Amr Moussa and Mohamed ElBaradei were suggested earlier by the anarchists as candidates to an interim civil caretaker cabinet or council. Thus the informal united People's Front is now moving towards a more firmly organized united People's Front, as suggested by the anarchists in the reports of 06.02.2011 and 07.02.2011 above. See also The official link-site of AI/IFA in this connection.

the Associated Press reported: The ruling military pledged Saturday to eventually hand power to an elected [NB! Election of significant rulers is not real democracy] civilian government [i.e. public sector, hopefully not x-archy, see dialog] and reassured allies that Egypt will abide by its peace treaty with Israel after the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, as it outlined the first cautious steps in a promised transition to greater democracy.

The military's statement Saturday had been eagerly awaited by the public and thousands of protesters still massed in Cairo's central Tahrir Square. The crowds were still riding high on jubiliation over the success in removing Mubarak on Friday after 18 days of unprecedented popular protests, but they were looking for a sign of the military's plans.

Appearing on state TV, a military spokesman said the Armed Forces Supreme Council [a.k.a. the Military High Council] asked the current government appointed by Mubarak in his final weeks to continue operating until a new one is formed. The step appeared to be a stop-gap measure to keep the state [i.e. public sector, hopefully not x-archy, see dialog] and economy functioning while a transitional administration is set up.

Protesters have called for dramatic steps to ensure Egypt moves to a real democracy after nearly 30 years of autocratic rule under Mubarak and his ruling party. Protest organizers have called for the dissolving of parliament - which is almost entirely made up of ruling party lawmakers - the forming of a new, broad-based transitional government [i.e. cabinet or public sector, hopefully not x-archy, see dialog] and creation of a committee to either amend the constitution or totally re-write it.

The Armed Forces Supreme Council, a body of the top-most generals that now rules Egypt, has not said whether it will carry out any of those steps. But Saturday's statement also did not rule it out.

In the square, some protesters welcomed the cautious first measures, despite distrust of the government put together by Mubarak as a gesture early in the wave of protests. "It was a good thing," said Muhammed Ibrahim, a 21-year-old from the Nile Delta town of Banha who joined the crowds in Tahrir. "We don't want there to be a political void."

The spokesman, Gen. Mohsen el-Fangari, appeared on state TV in front of a row of Egyptian military and national flags and read the council statement, proclaiming respect for the rule of law - perhaps a sign that the military aims to avoid imposing martial law. The military is "looking forward to a peaceful transition, for a free democratic system, to permit an elected civil authority [i.e. cabinet and public sector, hopefully not x-archy, see dialog] to be in charge of the country, to build a democratic free nation," he said.

The military underlined Egypt's "commitment to all its international treaties." Israel has been deeply concerned that Egypt's turmoil could threaten the 1979 peace accord signed between the two countries. The United States, Egypt's top ally, is also eager to ensure the accord remains in place. The military strongly supports the accord, not in small part because it guarantees US aid for the armed forces, currently running at $1.3 billion a year. Anti-Israeli feeling is strong in Egypt, and many of the hundreds of thousands of protesters expressed anger at Mubarak's close cooperation with Israel on a range of issues. Still, few seriously call for the abrogation of the treaty, realizing the international impact.

The emphasis in the military statement was on keeping the state [i.e. public sector, hopefully not x-archy, see dialog] and economy functioning after the turmoil of the past three weeks, which were a heavy blow to Egypt's economy. For days, many businesses and shops were closed, much of Cairo's population of 18 million stayed home under heavy curfew, and foreign tourists - one of the top sources of revenues - fled the country. This week, even as businesses began to reopen on a wide scale, labor strikes erupted around the country, many at state industries or branches of the bureaucracy [i.e. public sector, hopefully not x-archy, see dialog].

The military relaxed the curfew - now to run from midnight to 6 a.m. instead of 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. - and the Stock Market announced plans to reopen on Wednesday. The Supreme Council asked the public, particularly the millions in the government sector [i.e. in the meaning of public secor], to "work to push the economy forward," el-Fangari said, an apparent call for everyone to return to work. The military also called on the "current government [i.e. in the meaning of public secor] and provincial governors to continue their activities until a new government [i.e. cabinet and public sector, hopefully not x-archy, see dialog] is formed," el-Fangari said. The statement did not address when a new government [i.e. cabinet and public sector, hopefully not x-archy, see dialog] would be formed.

Direct actions are a part of real democracy. Fridays are the main direct action days, but continued protests at Tahrir Square are also a tourist attraction. Co-operate with Israel, the most libertarian country in the region! - is today's main anarchist resolution.

13.02.2011. A development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, and via organization, dialog and elections.

The road ahead. What must be done. Friday 11.02.2011, when the dictator left, the Egyptians experienced a glimpse of real democracy i.e. anarchy and anarchism, an Egyptian brand...

Anarchy and anarchism mean "system and management without ruler(s), i.e. co-operation without repression, tyranny and slavery". In short an-arch-y = (an = without - arch = ruler(s)) - y = system and management, as, say, in monarch-y. Anarchists are for and contribute to anarchy and anarchism world wide. One of the main tasks of anarchists is the fight against ochlarchy (mob rule broadly defined). To mix up opposites as a) anarchy and ochlarchy and b) anarchists with ochlarchists/ochlarchs, as outdated dictionaries, newsmedia and mislead youths often do, is equally authoritarian as mixing up opposites as peace and war, as Big Brother did in Orwell's "1984" newspeak. It should be stopped and anarchists make resolutions with free, libertarian criticism of this authoritarian tendency, and also contribute to other direct actions against ochlarchy, guards at demonstrations, etc.

Anarchists are not only against ochlarchy, but also monarchy, oligarchy, polyarchy, plutarchy, matriarchy, patriarchy, hierarchy, etc, i.e. in real terms, economic and/or political/administrative. Anarchists mean all forms of archies should be done away with, practically toward ideally. Anarchy and anarchism are coordination on equal footing, without superiors and subordinates, i.e. horizontal organization and co-operation without coercion. This means practically or ideally, i.e. ordinary vs perfect horizontal organization respectively. Thus, anarchy and anarchism mean real democracy, economical and political/administrative, in private and public sector.

Briefly defined State/archy in a broad societal meaning is systems with significantly large rank and/or income differences and inefficient, i.e. significantly vertically organized. Anarchies are systems with significantly small rank and income differences, plus efficiency, i.e. significantly horizontally organized.

Thus, if the system works significantly more from the bottom, grassroots - the people, and upwards, than from the top downwards, to the bottom, it is anarchism and anarchy. The grassroots - the people - is here defined as a class as opposed to the superiors economical and/or political/administrative, i.e. in income/remuneration and/or political/administrative rank. And thus anarchy and anarchism may happen just 1. a brief moment - a glimpse of anarchy, 2. in the short term, 3. medium term and 4. in the long term.

The fundamental parameters of a system, the coordinates on the economic-political map, are usually estimated as average, say, as moving averages, rather long term structural estimates, including the libertarian degree (= 100% - the authoritarian degree). Around the long term average structural estimates, there may be medium or short term dips or the opposite, a hike, without changing the fundamental rather long term average parameters.

Just a brief moment - a glimpse of anarchy, will of course in itself not change the long term structural average coordinates. There may however of course also be shift in the rather long term average structural estimates. A significant change of a system's coordinates is a revolution or a revolutionary change, and this may be short lived or a lasting change of a system's coordinates on the economic-political map. State/archy, seen as a societal concept, may be a form of marxism, populism/fascism or liberalism, see the economic-political map, click on: System theory, with the four main quadrants and the 16 sectors for different subsystems. Capitalism is economical plutarchy. Friday 11.02.2011, when the dictator left, the Egyptians experienced a glimpse of real democracy i.e. anarchy and anarchism, an Egyptian brand.

An Egyptian roadmap towards real democracy. The way to estimate the coordinates of the Egyptian, and other countries' economic-political system, is described in System theory - Chapter V.B. Thus, this chapter also gives information, a general roadmap, of what must be done to develope a system from a totalitarian right fascist system as the present Egyptian autocracy, towards real democracy, and higher on the EP-map. The de facto systems of a) the Anarchies of Norway, The Swiss Confederation and Iceland, and b) the Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, may c) give some hints about a long term aim, but also this aim must of course be of an Egyptian brand.

In the short run, and in general, a development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, and via organization, dialog and elections.

Saturday 12.02.2011 was the real start of the Egyptian revolution, i.e. a development of the country's system towards real democracy. Friday 11.02.2011 the anarchists declared:

Informal and more firmly organized People's Front. Mubarak was toppled Friday 11.02.2011 by a radically new force in Egyptian and regional politics — a largely secular, nonviolent, youth-led democracy movement that brought Egypt's leftist, libertarian, liberal/liberalist and islamist opposition groups together for the first time under its banner, i.e. a de facto informal united People's Front, as suggested by the anarchists, although formally nameless.

The opposition groups participating in the protest movement had as mentioned previously settled on a committee with Mohamed ElBaradei as primus motor, the former diplomat and Nobel laureate, to negotiate with the army if Mr. Mubarak resigned, mainly compatible with the anarchists' advice. In a television interview Friday 11.02.2011 he indicated that he expected the talks with the military to begin within days. "I'd like to see that started tomorrow so we can have a sharing of power, the civilian and the military, and tell them what our demands are, what they need to do," he said. Egypt's opposition has said for weeks that it welcomed a military role in securing the country, ideally under a three-member, or two- to five-member, presidential council with only one military member, compatible with the anarchists' advice.

By evening, Egyptian politicians were beginning to position themselves to run for office. Amr Moussa, one of the country's most popular public figures, resigned his position as secretary general of the Arab League, and an aide, Hesham Youssef, confirmed that Mr. Moussa was considering seeking office. Both Amr Moussa and Mohamed ElBaradei were suggested earlier by the anarchists as candidates to an interim civil caretaker cabinet or council. Thus the informal united People's Front is now moving towards a more firmly organized united People's Front, as suggested by the anarchists in the reports of 06.02.2011 and 07.02.2011 above. See also The official link-site of AI/IFA in this connection.

Informal Front still OK. But the informal united People's Front is still there, and can still be used for what it is good at. The informal united People's Front is made up of Egypt's independent labor confederations, human rights organizations, anti-government protesters, our fellows in the Egyptian sections of ACA & IWW and the other forces for democracy. Say, BBC has showed pictures of christians and muslims hugging each other, indicating there is an informal united People's Front. The informal united People's Front is efficient regarding more elementary demands of the opposition: With elementary demands we mean 1. "Mubarak must go" - already achieved, 2. release of all political prisoners, 3. lifting the curfew and ruling under martial law, 4. full freedom of speech and assembly, in general human rights, and 5. similar.

Firm Front needed soon. However, many other calls and demands are proposed and this require a more firm organization of a united People's Front, and a representative elected council of delegates of the opposition for a) more coordinate actions and b) continued dialogue with the so far totalitarian autocratic central administration. The People's Front should be organized as a real democratic confederation. The different opposition groups, or best the people in general (as opposed to the superiors), should organize with a controlled membership statistics, or such likely estimates, i.e. controlled by an interim council with the main informal spokespersons of the opposition, Mohamed ElBaradei and the "new group of 10 people" mentioned in the report 05.02.2011, and some more relevant persons, say, Amr Moussa; hold general assemblies each, and elect delegates to the representative elected council of delegates, proportional to the (estimated) membership. A minimum representation should be introduced for minorities, to avoid majority dictatorship. Internet etc. may be used in the same way as the Anarchist International - AI/IFA, to achieve transparency, checks and balances. The Council of delegates of the united People's Front, may have similar functions as the AI-secretariate. This should be done as soon as possible, to avoid chaos.

Slowly towards... Not a blueprint: The resolution above about a more firm organization of a united People's Front etc. is not meant as a blueprint, but as soon as the more elementary demands of the opposition, in general the people seen as a class as opposed to the superiors economically and/or political/admnistrative, i.e. in income and/or rank, are met, a more firm organization is urgently needed to avoid chaos. As soon as more advanced societal demands, i.e. economical and political/administrative, are on the agenda, a more firm organization of a united People's Front somewhat similar to our suggestions above is necessary to achieve optimal order and solutions, and avoid chaos. That is a steady and orderly development towards real democracy in Egypt, in a dynamic perspective, see System theory - Chapter V.B. It may take some time to develope such a more firm organization of the now informal united People's Front, but it should be developed slowly while the more elementary demands are met, and as soon as possible.

In the evening the situation in Egypt was the following:

Protests at symbolic Tahrir/Liberation Square almost wiped out by Ex-Mubarak military autocracy, saying it will rule to new elections, perhaps 6 months. The people's influence, if any..., will a.o.t. depend on planned mass protests each Friday, and direct actions in general.  

Egypt's military rulers dissolved the corrupt parliament, both the lower and upper houses, and suspended the constitution Sunday. The military junta that took over when Mubarak stepped down Friday set as a top priority the restoration of security, which collapsed during the 18 days of protests. The military ruling council said it will run the country for six months, or until presidential and parliament elections can be held. It said it was forming a committee to amend the constitution and set the rules for a popular referendum to endorse the amendments. Such a referendum is a form of direct action, and earlier suggested by the anarchists.

The so called caretaker cabinet, which was appointed by Mubarak shortly after the pro-democracy protests began on Jan. 25, will remain in place until a new cabinet is formed - a step that perhaps not will happen until after elections, and which probably is not popular among the people. The ruling military council reiterated that it would abide by all of Egypt's international treaties agreed in the Mubarak era, most importantly the peace treaty with Israel, a move approved by the libertarians.

The so called caretaker government met for the first time since Mubarak stepped down. "Our concern now in the cabinet is security, to bring security back to the Egyptian citizen," Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq told a news conference after the meeting. Shafiq said the military would decide whether Omar Suleiman, who was appointed vice president by Mubarak in a failed attempt to appease protesters, would play some role in Egypt's transition. "He might fill an important position in the coming era," the prime minister said, probably not popular among the people. He also denied rumors that Mubarak had fled to the United Arab Emirates, saying the former president remained in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh. He went there just hours after stepping down.

Protests at symbolic Tahrir/Liberation Square almost wiped  out by Ex-Mubarak military autocracy. Egyptian troops scuffled with holdout protesters in Tahrir/Liberation Square, in the evening relatively few protesters were at the square. There were outbreaks of labor unrest, including police protest. There were protests by workers at a ceramic factory, a textile factory and at least two banks, as Egyptians emboldened by Mubarak's fall sought to improve their lot in a country where poverty and other challenges will take years or decades to address.

Military troops took down makeshift tents and made some headway in dispersing protesters who didn't want to abandon their encampment in Tahrir Square, fearful that the generals entrusted with a transition to democratic rule will not fulfill all their pledges. Still, most protesters had left the square in downtown Cairo, and traffic moved through the area. The crowd on the square, the center of protests during the 18-day uprising, was down from a peak of a quarter-million at the height of the demonstrations to a few thousand on Sunday.

The Armed Forces Supreme Council, a.k.a. The Military High Council, is now the official ruler of Egypt after Mubarak handed it power. It consists of the commanders of each military branch, the chief of staff and Defense Minister Tantawi. The military  has promised to ensure democratic change, but many are somewhat skeptical. The institution was tightly bound to Mubarak's ruling system, and it has substantial economic and political/administrative interests that it will likely seek to preserve. As mentioned a development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, and via organization, dialog and elections. The people's influence -- economical and political/administrative, if any..., will a.o.t. depend on planned mass protests each Friday, and direct actions in general.

Corruption. Far-reaching corruption probes could test the resolve of senior military rulers who are running the country in the transition period. They are probably also corrupt...

The Anarchy of Switzerland - The Swiss Confederation has as mentioned frozen whatever assets Hosni Mubarak and his associates may have there, and anti-corruption campaigners are demanding the same of other countries. But experts say hunting for the deposed Egyptian leader's purported hidden wealth - let alone recovering it - will be an enormous task. Mubarak's actual worth remains a mystery. A recent claim that he and his sons Gamal and Alaa may have amassed a fortune of up to $70 billion - greater than that of Microsoft's Bill Gates - helped drive the protests that eventually brought him down. "Oh, Mubarak, tell us where you got 70 billion dollars!" protesters chanted in demonstrations before Egypt's ruler of 30 years was driven from office Friday, and left Cairo for a gated compound in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh. Corruption was endemic in Mubarak's Egypt where 40 percent of the country's 80 million people live on $2 or less a day, and critics accused officials of usurping the nation's wealth. Egyptians have long complained of an unspoken policy of sweetheart deals that allowed top officials and businessmen to enrich themselves.

In recent days, watchdog groups and private lawyers have demanded that the country's chief prosecutor launch criminal investigations against the Mubaraks and some of their wealthy associates. Scores of former government officials have already been banned from travel and several, among them four former cabinet ministers, have had their assets frozen. How far these investigations will go ultimately depends on the political will of Egypt's leadership. What you often find is that while there's a kind of political impetus that seems to want to do it, the reality is that the real urge for transparency is more symbolic than real. Far-reaching corruption probes could test the resolve of senior military rulers who are running the country in the transition period. They are probably also corrupt. Anti-corruption campaigners are calling for a speedy investigation and are urging countries other than Switzerland to freeze assets pre-emptively. "It's going to be a very difficult task, but in the interest of public money, things need to move now," said Omnia Hussien, Egypt expert at the advocacy group Transparency International.

Meanwhile...

Tunisia's foreign minister has resigned just weeks after he was named to replace the month-old transitional government's first, short-lived foreign minister, the official TAP news agency said Sunday. The report didn't provide any details about the reasons behind Ahmed Ounaies' resignation, but critics have decried what they saw as the offhand way he described the "people's revolution" that ousted the North African nation's longtime autocratic president, Zine Al Abidine Ben Ali, on Jan. 14. It was not immediately clear when Ounaies' replacement would be named.

Bahrain's security forces set up checkpoints and clashed with marchers in at least one village Sunday as opposition groups blanketed social media sites with calls to stage the first major anti-government protests in the Gulf since the uprising in Egypt. The wide-ranging clampdown appeared directed toward Bahrain's Shiite majority - which had led the drive for Monday's rallies - and reflected the increasing worries of the Sunni rulers who have already doled out cash and promised greater media reforms in an effort to quell the protest fervor. A prominent human rights activist predicted "chaos and bloodshed" if attempts are made to crush the planned demonstrations.

The United Arab Emirates says a man arrested for an outburst in a mosque that a rights group says was in support of the Egypt and Tunisia protests has not had his rights taken away. Last week, London-based Amnesty International said he was detained for speaking out in support of the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia during Friday prayers Feb. 4 and was being denied visits. A statement on the state-run WAM news agency Sunday says Hassan Mohammed al-Hammadi has access to his attorney and family members. The UAE said the man violated the "norms" of mosque worship by grabbing the microphone from the imam. It gave no further details, but the UAE strictly limits public protests.

Yemeni police armed with sticks and daggers on Sunday beat back thousands of protesters marching through the capital in a third straight day of demonstrations calling for political reforms and the resignation of the country's US-allied president. The protests have mushroomed since crowds gathered Friday to celebrate the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak after an 18-day revolt fueled by similar grievances. Yemen is one of several countries in the Middle East feeling the aftershocks of pro-reform uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. Police used truncheons to stop protesters, many of them university students, from reaching the capital's central Hada Square. Witnesses said plainclothes policemen wielding daggers and sticks also joined security forces in driving the protesters back. The Ministry of Interior called on people not to heed "suspicious calls for chaos" and to avoid rallies which "obstruct the course of daily life." Yemen's president Ali Abdullah Saleh also postponed a trip to Washington scheduled for next month due to the "circumstances in the country," the state news agency reported.

In Algeria... The organizers of a pro-reform protest that brought thousands of Algerians onto the streets of the capital over the weekend called Sunday for another rally next week. The Coordination for Democratic Change in Algeria - an umbrella group for human rights activists, unionists, lawyers and others - has called for the Feb. 19 demonstrations to take place throughout the country. Saturday's rally - which came a day after an uprising in Egypt toppled that country's autocratic ruler - took place only in the capital, Algiers. Organizers said around 10,000 took part in the gathering, though officials put turnout at 1,500. Many protesters held signs reading "Bouteflika out," in reference to President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, in power in the impoverished but gas-rich North African nation since 1999. Under the country's long-standing state of emergency, public protests are banned in Algiers, and an estimated 26,000 riot police set up barriers throughout the city in a failed bid to quash Saturday's gathering, organizers said.

14.02.2011. Protests in Tahrir Square crushed by the partly criminal military police. Several anti-government protesters arrested. But later police protested in the square - to show solidarity with the anti-government movement. Direct actions continue. Dialog.

For the second day running, military police in red berets surrounded the last protesters at Tahrir/Liberation Square. This time they told the demonstrators in no uncertain terms that it was time to leave. The soldiers have been persuading them to leave, pushing them away and in a few cases arresting them. The blankets used by the protesters are being loaded on to a lorry and soldiers are surrounding the scene. But just as the protests end, a wave of strikes is hitting Egypt, including bank workers, transport workers and even the police marching on the interior ministry. After years of pent up frustrations it is going to be very difficult controlling these powerful new movements. However, it had to instruct banks to remain closed on Monday following the strike threats. The Egyptian stock exchange has also postponed its reopening until Sunday 20 February at the earliest.

Hundreds of bank employees protested outside a branch of the Bank of Alexandria in central Cairo, calling for their managers to resign. Outside the state TV and radio building, hundreds of public transport workers took part in a demonstration, calling for better pay. One protester, Ahmed Ali, told Reuters news agency: "The big people steal and the little people get nothing." Many employees blame bosses for what they consider to be huge earnings gaps in companies.

Ambulance drivers parked 70 of their emergency vehicles along a riverside road in a pay protest. Near the Great Pyramids, some 150 tourism industry workers also demanded higher wages. The tourism sector, which accounts for 6% of GDP and is in its peak season, has been badly hit by the anti-government demonstrations. Strikes and protests at other state-owned firms across Egypt have hit the postal, media, textile and steel industries. Fresh protests and strikes have flared in Egypt as demonstrators demand better pay and conditions from the country's new military rulers. Bank, transport and tourism workers all demonstrated in Cairo after 18 days of protests succeeded in removing President Hosni Mubarak.

Police also protested in Cairo's Tahrir Square - to show solidarity with the anti-government movement. Hundreds of uniformed and plain-clothes police marched to Tahrir Square shouting "We and the people are one" and vowing to "honor the martyrs of the revolution". The officers wanted to convey the message that they had been forced to act against their wishes in using force on protesters early in the anti-government demonstration. Seems like the bottom line police are joining the united People's Front. Also several hundred protesters from the state Youth and Sports Organization protested Monday in Tahrir, or Liberation, Square. The military had earlier cleared the square of protesters.

The ruling military junta has urged people to return to work to try to get the country back to normal. There are reports the military is planning to prevent meetings by labor unions or professional organizations, effectively banning strikes. This could cause more unrest and trouble. Monday has been declared a public holiday in Egypt after disruption by workers at state banks. It means there will be a two-day break as Tuesday is already a scheduled holiday.

Workers in many state industries have been staging sit-ins and strikes, citing a variety of grievances. Inspired by the success of the protests which finally forced Hosni Mubarak to step down as president on Friday, they are united by a new sense of being able to speak out.

Dialog. Key activist Wael Ghonim said that there had been an encouraging meeting between the military and youth representatives on Sunday.

Thus the fight for a revolutionary change, i.e. a revolution, mainly compatible with anarchist policy, continues, but the non-progressiv Ex-Mubarak military autocracy is powerful.

Meanwhile there are protests and chaos in Iran, see IJA 2(39) for more information.

In Egypt the new autocratic ruling generals have called on EU to freeze whatever asset, suspected criminal, that Hosni Mubarak and his associates may have there. In the afternoon the protests in Egypt are increasing...

Direct actions against the top heavy economic pyramid, also in Tahrir/Liberation Square. The anarchists warn the autocratic ruling generals about mutiny by the bottom line military and police if these demands are not met.

Fresh protests and strikes have flared in Egypt as demonstrators demand better pay and conditions from the country's new autocratic ruling generals. Bank, transport and tourism workers all demonstrated in Cairo after 18 days of protests succeeded in removing President Hosni Mubarak. In a TV statement, the military urged all Egyptians to go back to work, most likely in vain. In a televised statement, the autocratic ruling generals said the best guarantee of a smooth transition to civilian rule would be if all Egyptians went back to work. Strikes and disputes "will damage the security of the country", the army's autocratic ruling high council falsely declared. Earlier Cairo's Tahrir Square was cleared of protesters, but thousands soon returned, joined by bottom line police.

As mentioned, early on Monday, the criminal military police moved in to clear the last remaining democracy protesters. But Tahrir Square was not left to the motorists for long. Wave upon wave of new protesters have been coming through. They include the police, blamed by many for repressing the earlier protests and maintaining President Mubarak in power. But the police wanted to let everyone know that they're being treated as scapegoats. Then various groups of workers joined the demonstrations, including some employees from the vast government building on the edge of the square and more anti-government demonstrators. Across Egypt, it's a slightly chaotic situation -- due to the destructive contra-revolutionary policy by the new autocratic ruling generals -- with workers staging their own mini-revolts against their bosses. And there is no sign it's going to calm down any time soon.

Thus the fight for a revolutionary change, i.e. a revolution -- in libertarian, real democratic direction -- and mainly compatible with anarchist policy, continues, but the non-progressive Ex-Mubarak military autocracy is still powerful. There are significant direct actions, i.e. strikes, sit-ins and rallies, against the top heavy Egyptian economic pyramid, also protests in Tahrir/Liberation Square. The anarchists warn the autocratic ruling generals about mutiny by the bottom line military and police if these fair demands are not met.

Egypt echoes across region: Iran, Bahrain, Yemen, Associated Press reports: The possible heirs of Egypt's uprising took to the streets Monday in different corners of the Middle East: Iran's beleaguered opposition stormed back to central Tehran and came under a tear gas attack by police. Demonstrators faced rubber bullets and birdshot to demand more freedoms in the relative wealth of Bahrain. And protesters pressed for the ouster of the ruler in poverty-drained Yemen. The protests - all with critical interests for Washington - offer an important lesson about how groups across Middle East are absorbing the message from Cairo and tailoring it to their own aspirations. The heady themes of democracy, justice and empowerment remain intact as the protest wave works it way through the Arab world and beyond. What changes, however, are the objectives. The Egypt effect, it seems, is elastic.

"This isn't a one-size-fits-all thing," said Mustafa Alani, a regional analyst at the Gulf Research Center in Dubai. "Each place will interpret the fallout from Egypt in their own way and in their own context." For the Iranian opposition - not seen on the streets in more than a year - it's become a moment to reassert its presence after facing relentless pressures. Tens of thousands of protesters clashed with security forces along some of Tehran's main boulevards, which were shrouded in clouds of tear gas in scenes that recalled the chaos after the disputed re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in June 2009. A pro-government news agency reported one bystander killed by gunfire. "Death to the dictator," many yelled in reference to Ahmadinejad. Others took aim Iran's all-powerful Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei with chants linking him with toppled rulers Hosni Mubarak in Egypt and Tunisia's Zine Al Abidine Ben Ali. "Bin Ali, Mubarak, it's Seyed Ali's turn," protesters cried.

The reformist website kaleme.com said police stationed several cars in front of the home of opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi ahead of the demonstration. Mousavi and fellow opposition leader Mahdi Karroubi have been under house arrest since last week after they asked the government for permission to hold a rally in support of Egypt's uprising - which Iran's leaders have claimed was a modern-day replay of their 1979 Islamic Revolution. Karroubi and Mousavi, however, have compared the unrest in Egypt and Tunisia with their own struggles. Mousavi said all region's revolts aimed at ending the "oppression of the rulers." A new US State Department Twitter account in Farsi took a jab at Iran in one of its first messages Sunday, calling on Tehran to "allow people to enjoy same universal rights to peacefully assemble, demonstrate as in Cairo." US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton expressed support for the Iranian protesters, saying they "deserve to have the same rights that they saw being played out in Egypt and are part of their own birthright."

In Yemen, meanwhile, the protests are about speeding the ouster of the US allied president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, who has promised he would step down in 2013. Monday's protests mirrored the calls in Egypt and Tunisia against the leaders there who had been in power for decades: "The people want the regime to step down." Protesters in the tiny Gulf nation of Bahrain are not looking to topple its monarchy. But their demands are no less lofty: greater political freedom and sweeping changes in how the country is run. The next possible round of demonstrations gives a similar divide.

A coalition in Algeria - human rights activists, unionists, lawyers and others - has called protests Saturday to push for the end of President Abdelaziz Bouteflika's 12-year rule. Kuwait's highly organized opposition, including parliament members, plans gatherings March 8 to demand a wholesale change of cabinet officials, but not the ruling emir. "We are experiencing a pan-Arab democratic moment of sorts," said Shadi Hamid, director of research at The Brookings Doha Center in Qatar. "For opposition groups, it comes down the question of, 'If not now, when?'" But he noted that the newfound Arab confidence for change will go in various directions. "The Arab opposition are using the Egyptian model as a message that anything is possible," Hamid said. "Then they interpret that into their local context."

In Yemen, more than 1,000 people, including lawyers in their black courtroom robes, joined a fourth consecutive day of protests in the capital of Sanaa - a day after police attacked anti-government marchers with sticks and daggers. Human Rights Watch said police on Sunday also used stun guns and batons to disperse protesters. "We will continue our protests until the regime falls," independent lawmaker Ahmed Hashid said. Police separated the opposition rally from a hundred government supporters holding pictures of the president.

Bahrain was more violent. Security forces fired tear gas, rubber bullets and birdshot pellets at thousands of anti-government protesters heeding calls to unite in a major rally and bring the Arab reform wave to the Gulf for the first time. At least 25 people were injured, and one man died after suffering severe head trauma. Police later used vans and other vehicles to block main roads into the capital of Manama to prevent a mass gathering that organizers intended as an homage to Egypt's Tahrir Square. Social media sites have been flooded with calls by an array of political youth groups, rights activists and others to join demonstrations Monday, a symbolic day in Bahrain as the anniversary of the country's 2002 constitution that brought pro-democracy reforms such as an elected parliament.

But opposition groups seek deeper changes from the country's ruling dynasty, including transferring more decision-making powers to the parliament and breaking the monarchy's grip on senior government posts. Bahrain's majority Shiites - about 70 percent of the population - have long complained of systemic discrimination by the Sunni rulers. The nation - no bigger in area than New York City - is among the most politically volatile in the Gulf. A crackdown on perceived dissidents last year touched off riots and street battles in Shiite areas. Some protesters carried mock Valentine's Day greetings from a prominent Bahraini blogger in custody, Ali Abdul-Imam.

"Arabs have been inspired by Egypt and empowered to believe that their voices must be heard and respected," wrote James Zogby, president of the Arab American Institute, in a commentary in Abu Dhabi's The National newspaper. "It will make life more complicated for Western and Arab policy makers." Monday's unrest touched on two key points of Washington's Mideast constellation. Bahrain is home to the US Navy's 5th Fleet, one of the Pentagon's main counterweights to Iran's attempts to expand influence in the Gulf. Yemen's militant networks offer safe haven for al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, which has planned and launched several attack against the US, including the attempted airliner bombing on Christmas Day 2009 and the failed mail bomb plot involving cargo planes last summer.

The US military plans a $75 million training program with Yemen's counterterrorism unit to expand its size and capabilities in the nation's difficult mountain terrain. Last month, the US also delivered four Huey helicopters to Yemen and has been training the aviation units. "What has happened in Tunisia and Egypt has terrified pro-Western Arab rulers," said Fawaz Gerges, a professor of Middle Eastern politics at the London School of Economics. "One of the lessons that the US will take from current unrest is that the status quo is no longer sustainable," he added. "There are huge cracks in the Arab authoritarian wall. It's the end of an era and the US must make very tough choices and decisions." Turkish President Abdullah Gul, who is visiting Iran, urged governments in the Middle East to listen to the their people. "When leaders and heads of countries do not pay attention to the demands of their nations, the people themselves take action to achieve their demands," the official Islamic Republic News Agency quoted Gul as saying.

15.02.2011. Industrial actions against the economic plutarchy. There is capacity for GDP/capita per day = 6 200/365 = 17 $ per day equal pay, up from 2 $ for the poor now, and less for the economical plutarchists/capitalists.

The fight for a revolutionary change, i.e. a revolution -- in libertarian, real democratic direction -- and mainly compatible with anarchist policy, continues, but the non-progressive Ex-Mubarak military junta autocracy is still powerful. There are significant direct actions, i.e. strikes, sit-ins and rallies etc., against the top heavy Egyptian economic pyramid, i.e. economical plutarchy. For more information about economical plutarchy/capitalism, i.e. top heavy income pyramid, economic hierarchy, and the fight against it, see the introduction at the AI's official links-site, Anarchy is optimal order - in the preamble to IAT-APT, System theory and economic-political map (search for plutarchy in this file) and the Resolutions of the World Economic Council (WEC) with links. Industrial actions, direct actions, against the economic plutarchy are going on in Egypt and increasing. The themes of democracy, justice and empowerment remain intact as the protest wave in Egypt increases and gets broader...

There is capacity/ability for GDP/capita per day = 6 200/365 = 17 $ per day PPP equal pay, up from 2 $ for the poor, and less for the economical plutarchists/capitalists. Thus there is capacity/ability for (17/2)100 %, i.e. 850 % pay hike for the poor up to equal pay, with 100% flat pay-distribution, i.e. about 100% horizontal economical organization, but then of course much less pay for the present top of the economic pyramid and hierarchy, the economical plutarchists/capitalists. Thus there is capacity/ability for significant realistic pay hikes, say, 100 % to 200 % perhaps more, for the poor - the bottom line workers, in general the people seen as a societal class. The anarchists again warn the autocratic ruling generals, the military junta, about mutiny by the bottom line military and police if these fair demands are not met. As mentioned a development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, and via organization, dialog and elections. GDP/capita = 6 200 $ is 2010 estimate US $ PPP, purchasing power parity, for Egypt, according to the CIA Factbook.

As mentioned yesterday, Monday and Tuesday this week are decided to be public holidays, and the industrial actions are less noticeable, but they will almost certain be very noticeable later in the week.

Mubarak loyalist becomes Egypt's transition leader, Associated Press reports: A US diplomatic cable reported that the defense minister was known as "Mubarak's poodle," a derisive reference to his unswerving loyalty to the former [ultra-]authoritarian president. Yet huge crowds of Egyptians who demonstrated for 18 days against Hosni Mubarak's rule saw Defense Minister Hussein Tantawi and his troops as their savior. They appealed to the military to intervene in Egypt's crisis, and the generals did. Tantawi, the head of the ruling council that took power from Mubarak on Friday, is the new leader of what many Egyptians hope will be a radical transformation of their nation. The 75-year-old career soldier will be one of the most scrutinized figures in Egypt in the months ahead when his council has promised to steer the country toward a democratic system, sealed by elections.

But he is an unlikely steward for the task, a man said to be resistant to change and out of touch with the younger officer corps. "Tantawi and the army gave a strong message to the public and Mubarak: We are with the people and their legitimate demands," said Abdullah el-Sinnawi, editor-in-chief of el-Araby, an opposition weekly newspaper. "He managed to unify the army under his command," el-Sinnawi added. Some low- and middle-ranking officers did not hide their sympathy for the protesters, cheering and mingling with demonstrators. The generally positive reviews of the military's actions, coming so soon after they took power, surprised some who thought Tantawi lacked the reflex for change.

On Tuesday, the Armed Forces Supreme Council said a panel of experts would craft constitutional amendments so as to allow free elections later this year. Previously, the military dissolved parliament, which was stacked with Mubarak loyalists, and suspended the constitution, meeting key demands of pro-democracy activists. The military, which has long received huge quantities of US aid, maneuvered deftly in the crisis. It did not use force against protesters, earning the gratitude of crowds that appealed for the armed forces to push Mubarak from power after nearly 30 years.

The military had sought a neutral role in the conflict. But it swung against the president in his final hours to prevent more bloodshed and chaos, saying it did not want all of Egypt's achievements to be lost. The shift was evident on the ground, where soldiers tossed sweets, cookies and bottles of water to protesters outside a presidential palace in Cairo. Also leaked US diplomatic indicated there may have been some tensions between Tantawi and the Mubarak family. They said Tantawi was frustrated with the prospect that Mubarak's son Gamal. might ascend to the presidency. Gamal Mubarak, in turn, was believed to be hostile to Tantawi and wanted him to be removed. Tantawi himself showed populist savvy during the crisis by visiting Tahrir Square, the protest encampment occupied by tens of thousands of anti-Mubarak activists, who frequently chanted slogans such as "the army, the people, one hand," extolling their unity.

During his visit about midway through the crisis, he appealed to the crowds to recognize Mubarak's early concessions, including a promise not to run for re-election and an offer of dialogue. Protesters, however, were not satisfied. Tantawi was the former commander of the elite Republican Guards, who protect the president and his palaces. As defense minister, he had a much lower profile than a predecessor, Abdel-Halim Abu Ghazala, who was widely popular among troops and civilians and was even talked about as a possible successor to Mubarak.

Mindful of that popularity, Mubarak sacked Abu Ghazala in 1989. In contrast, US diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks, the secret-sharing website, cited a report that army officers were disgruntled and disdainful of Tantawi, referring to him as a lackey of Mubarak who was incompetent and driving the military into decay. A 2008 cable said of Tantawi: "He and Mubarak are focused on regime stability and maintaining the status quo through the end of their time. They simply do not have the energy, inclination or world view to do anything differently." Tantawi rarely appears in public, and has not made an appearance since Mubarak's resignation on Friday. Previously, Egyptians saw him on television, saluting troops during annual celebrations, at funerals of top commander and at meetings with Mubarak.

One former sports and youth minister, Abdel Moneim Emra, said Tantawi opposed privatization, which was associated with Gamal Mubarak - a wealthy businessman [i.e. economical plutarchist/capitalist, see System theory (search for 'plutarch' in this file)] who rose in the ranks of the ruling National Democratic Party and was considered a possible successor to his father. El-Sinnawi, the newspaper editor, said Tantawi always perceived the privatization policies of Gamal and his associates as a kind of "new imperialism" that was draining Egypt's ownership of its resources. "He saw them as Western-minded kids who are selling the country," el-Sinnawi said.

Tantawi's philosophy recalls the anti-imperialism of Gamal Abdel Nasser, an Arab nationalist and military man who overthrew the monarchy in 1952 and implemented reforms in Egypt that were inspired by socialism [see System theory (search for 'socialism' in this file)]. Tantawi fought in Egypt's three wars with Israel: in 1956, 1967 and 1973. In the last war, he led a battalion in a well-known battle called the "Chinese Farm." He was appointed chief commander of the armed forces in May 1991.

The development in other countries in North Africa and the Middle East Tuesday: Thousands of protesters took over a main square in Bahrain's capital Tuesday - carting in tents and raising banners - in a bold attempt to copy Egypt's uprising and force high-level changes in one of Washington's key allies in the Gulf. The move by demonstrators capped two days of clashes across the tiny island kingdom that left at least two people dead, parliament in limbo by an opposition boycott and the king making a rare address on national television to offer condolences for the bloodshed. Security forces - apparently under orders to hold back - watched from the sidelines as protesters chanted slogans mocking the nation's ruling sheiks and called for sweeping political reforms and an end to monarchy's grip on key decisions and government posts.

The unrest in Bahrain, home to the US Navy's 5th Fleet, adds another layer to Washington's worries in the region. Many in Bahrain boiled down their discontent to a cry for economic justice as well - saying the Sunni rulers control the privileges and opportunities and the Shiite majority struggles with what's left over and are effectively blackballed from important state jobs. "I demand what every Bahraini should have: a job and a house," said student Iftikhar Ali, 27, who joined the crowds in the seaside Pearl Square. "I believe in change."

Protesters quickly renamed it "Nation's Square" and erected banners such as "Peaceful" that were prominent in Cairo's Tahrir Square. Many waved Bahraini flags and chanted: "No Sunnis, no Shiites. We are all Bahrainis." Others set up tents and distributed tea and kabobs for those planning to spend the night under one of the city's landmarks: a nearly 300-foot (90-meter) monument cradling a giant white pearl-shaped ball that symbolizes the country's heritage as a pearl diving center. Someone used stones to spell out the message in Arabic: "The real criminals are the royal family." There is no direct call to bring down the king, whose family has ruled Bahrain for more than two centuries. But he is suddenly under unprecedented pressure to make serious changes in how the country is run.

The key demands - listed on a poster erected in the square - included the release of all political prisoners, more jobs and housing, an elected cabinet and the replacement of the longtime prime minister, Sheik Khalifa bin Salman Al Khalifa. Even the security forces they have battled represent something more than just state-backed muscle. Bahrain's leaders have for years granted citizenship to Sunnis from across the region to expand their base of loyalists and try to gain demographic ground against Shiites, about 70 percent of the population of some 500,000. Many of the Sunnis - Jordanians, Syrians and others - receive police jobs or other security-related posts.

In a clear sign of concern over the widening crisis, King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa went on nationwide TV to offer condolences for the deaths, pledge an investigation into the killings and promising to push ahead with promised reforms, which include loosening state controls on the media and Internet. "We extend our condolences to the parents of the dear sons who died yesterday and today. We pray that they are inspired by the Almighty's patience, solace and tranquility," said the king, who had previously called for an emergency Arab summit to discuss the growing unrest. Bahrain is one of the most politically volatile nations in the Middle East's wealthiest corner despite having one of the few elected parliaments and some of the most robust civil society groups.

The nation's Shiites have long complained of discrimination. A crackdown on perceived dissent last year touched off weeks of riots and clashes in Shiite villages, and an ongoing trial in Bahrain accuses 25 Shiites of plotting against the leadership. The detainees allege they have been tortured behind bars. Bahrain is also an economic weakling compared with the staggering energy riches of Gulf neighbors such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar, which can afford far more generous social benefits. Bahrain's oil reserves are small and its role as the region's international financial hub have been greatly eclipsed by Dubai. In Geneva, a statement by the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay called on Bahrain to "curb the excesses" of security forces. "Too many peaceful protesters have recently been killed across the Middle East and North Africa," Pillay said.

The deaths also brought sharp denunciations from the largest Shiite political bloc, Al Wefaq, which suspended its participation in parliament, and could threaten the nation's gradual pro-democracy reforms that have given Shiites a greater political voice. The group has 18 seats in the 40-member chamber. The second day of turmoil began after police tried to disperse up to 10,000 mourners gathering at a hospital parking lot to begin a funeral procession for Ali Abdulhadi Mushaima, 21, who died in Monday's marches. Officials at Bahrain's Salmaniya Medical Complex said a 31-year-old man, Fadhel Salman Matrook, became the second fatality when he died of injuries from birdshot fired during the melee in the hospital's parking lot. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not allowed to speak to journalists.

A statement from Bahrain's interior minister, Lt. Gen. Rashid bin Abdulla Al Khalifa, expressed "sincere condolences and deep sympathy" to Mushaima's family. He expanded on the king's pledge: stressing that the deaths will be investigated and charges would be filed if authorities determined excessive force was used against the protesters. But that's unlikely to appease the protesters. In the past week, Bahrain's rulers have tried to defuse calls for reform by promising nearly $2,700 for each family and pledging to loosen state controls on the media.

In Yemen, police and government supporters battled nearly 3,000 marchers calling for the ouster of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in a fifth straight day of violence. Yemen is seen as a critical partner in the US fight against a network inspired by al-Qaeda. The Pentagon plans to boost its training of Yemen's counterterrorism forces to expand the push against the al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula faction, which has been linked to attacks including the attempted airliner bombing in December 2009 and the failed mail bomb plot involving cargo planes last summer. Saleh has been holding talks with Yemen's powerful tribes, which can either tip the balance against him or give him enough strength to possibly ride out the crisis. The political mutinies in the Arab world show the wide reach of the calls for change spurred by the toppling of old-guard regimes in Tunisia and Egypt. Yemen's grinding poverty and tribal complexities also stand in contrast to the relative wealth and Western-style malls and coffee shops in Bahrain's capital of Manama.

In Jordan, hundreds of Bedouin tribesmen blocked roads to demand the government return lands they once owned. Saudi activists are seeking to form a political party in a rare challenge to the near-absolute power of the pro-Western monarchy.

Iran update. For an update on the protests and chaos in Iran, see IJA 2(39) for more information.

Tunisia extended a state of emergency that has been in place since the country's long time autocratic president was overthrown during an uprising last month, while it ended the curfew imposed during the deadly protests, the Interior Ministry said Tuesday. The curfew was in place since Jan. 13, the day before President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled to Saudi Arabia in the wake of clashes between police and protesters angry about unemployment, corruption and repression. A United Nations mission has said at least 219 people were killed in the unrest - including dozens in prison fires - while 510 were injured. The curfew's hours had gradually been reduced in ensuing weeks. Most recently, it prevented people from walking outside or driving from midnight until 4 a.m.

The state of emergency, declared Jan. 14, forbids any public street gathering of three people or more, though that rule has rarely been enforced. It also authorizes police and security forces to use their weapons against suspects who do not turn themselves in when ordered to do so, and against fleeing suspects who cannot be apprehended. Life in Tunisia has largely returned to normal as a caretaker government tries to stabilize the largely Muslim country ahead of elections, supposed to take place later in 2011. Stores, markets, gas stations and schools have reopened, and people have returned to work. The marauding gangs of suspected regime loyalists who pillaged homes and businesses in the early days of upheaval have mostly faded away, though sporadic incidents persist.

There have also been questions over whether radical islam could emerge in Tunisia. Ben Ali maintained a relentless crackdown on islamists. His tactics drew frequent complaints from human rights groups who said he used the sweeping crackdown to justify his repressive policies. On Friday, several Muslim fundamentalists broke away from a demonstration and stopped in front of the capital's synagogue, making anti-Semitic remarks, said Roger Bismuth, the leader of Tunisia's small, historic Jewish community. Bismuth, however, downplayed the incident. "There's no reason to be worried about a few inappropriate comments by a few rowdy people passing by the synagogue," he told the Associated Press. The Tunisian Interior Ministry, in a statement carried by the official TAP news agency, said it strongly condemned the incident and said it would work to preserve religious harmony "and fight all those who incite violence or discord."

Tunisian migrants marched through the tiny Sicilian island Lampedusa on Tuesday to thank Italy for welcoming them, but the government and EU moved to stem the exodus of North African migrants to Europe. The migrant flight was prompted by clashes between police and protesters in Tunisia that forced its president, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, to flee to Saudi Arabia on Jan. 14, and inspired the uprisings in Egypt and beyond. Some 2,000 of the 5,337 Tunisians who arrived in recent days remained on Lampedusa, a tiny island with a permanent population of about 6,000 that is closer to Africa than the Italian mainland, awaiting transfer to immigrant holding centers elsewhere in Italy.

"We want to thank all the Italians and the people from Lampedusa because they gave housing and food to 5,000 people and they were very nice to us," said Zawhir Kermiti, a 32-year-old who was one of a few dozen people who marched Tuesday. He and others arrived in Sicily in fishing boats from Tunisia. Overnight, Italian authorities intercepted a boat of 32 people believed to be from Egypt off the coast of Ragusa on Sicily, indicating that the exodus was not confined to Tunisia alone. "The institutional earthquake that took place in Egypt could provoke significant immigration flows," Italian Interior Minister Roberto Maroni warned Tuesday. "Europe cannot remain indifferent: it must take a strong and decisive political decision."

Italy has arrested 26 people who operated the boats and seized 41 vessels. Identity checks have found some of the arrivals were criminals who escaped from Tunisian jails in the chaos, Maroni said. He spoke at a news conference in the Sicilian city of Catania, where he and Premier Silvio Berlusconi toured a NATO military residence with a capacity of 7,000 people that the government is considering turning into a "village" for possible asylum-seekers. Lampedusa Mayor Bernardino Rubeis has said that the Tunisians have mostly been respectful and that the situation is under control. "There is no security emergency because they are free to walk around the island, but they are respecting our territory, not creating any trouble," he said.

On Tuesday, many of new arrivals awaited ferries to take them from Lampedusa to immigrant holding centers elsewhere in Sicily or on the Italian mainland. "It took 30 hours from Djerba to here. It wasn't very dangerous. We were 260 people on this boat," said Samir, a 24-year-old Tunisian who asked not to give his last name. Djerba is an island located off the coast of Tunisia. He spoke as he and others picked through the wreckage of their fishing boats that have been hauled out of the harbor and piled in a sort of boat cemetery near a soccer field. Among the debris in the boats are blankets, gloves and cell phone battery chargers.

No boats arrived overnight on Lampedusa, primarily because of poor weather. But Maroni, who has said the exodus was of "biblical" proportions, said he had no illusions that the onslaught was over. "So far, the (Tunisian) border controls have stopped four boats and turned them back, but 47 more escaped the controls," Italian Interior Minister Roberto Maroni said. He said he planned to meet with his counterparts in France, Spain, Malta, Greece and Cyprus in the coming days to decide on further immediate measures to take. He said Italy alone needed some euro100 million from EU funds to confront the emergency over the next three months.

EU Commission spokesman Michele Cercone said the EU had received a letter from Italy listing its needs and that the EU was looking to give Italy aid through its refugee and border fund. On Monday, the EU announced a euro258 million ($347 million) aid package to Tunisia from now until 2013, with euro17 million ($22.9 million) of that to be delivered immediately. EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton, visiting Tunisia, said the funds were a gift, not a loan. Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini met with Tunisian authorities Monday night in Tunis and concurred that Tunisia was responsible for patrolling its coast but that European border agency Frontex should beef up its presence in international waters. Tunisia had strongly rejected an offer by Maroni for Italian police contingents to help patrol the coast.

EU Home Affairs Commissioner Cecilia Malmstroem late Tuesday declared the exodus a "matter of importance for the whole EU," and said Frontex had sent two experts to the scene. Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini said Italy cannot accept everyone who arrives, but at the same time must help Tunisia and other North African countries create conditions so young people don't feel the need to flee. "We can't package them up and send them back home," Frattini said Tuesday. "We have to help them reintegrate themselves" with economic help. After his visit, Tunisia's TAP news agency reported that Italy would provide euro5 million ($6.8 million) in emergency aid to Tunisia, as well as radar equipment and patrol boats to the Tunisian military, and offer a euro100 million ($135 million) credit line. It's unclear whether this is part of the overall EU package announced Monday.

Egypt again - later Tuesday. The Associated Press reported: Egypt: Muslim Brotherhood plans political party. The long banned Muslim Brotherhood said Tuesday it will form a political party once democracy is established in Egypt but promised not to field a candidate for president, trying to allay fears at home and abroad that it seeks power. Still, the fundamentalist movement is poised to be a significant player in the new order. Egypt's new military rulers gave a strong sign they recognize that the Brotherhood, which calls for creation of an islamic state in the Arab world's most populous nation, can no longer be barred from politics after the mass uprising that forced out President Hosni Mubarak with 18 days of protests.

The Armed Forces Supreme Council included a former Brotherhood lawmaker on an eight-member panel tasked with amending the constitution enough to allow democratic elections later this year. The panel is comprised of legal experts of various ideologies, including secular liberal scholars and three judges from the current Supreme Constitutional Court, one of them a Christian, Maher Sami Youssef. The changes aim to open the field for political parties to form, loosen restrictions on who can run for president and write in guarantees to prevent the rampant election rigging that ensured Mubarak's ruling party a lock on power. The panel's head is Tareq el-Bishri, considered one of Egypt's top legal minds. A former judge, he was once a secular leftist but became a prominent thinker in the "moderate islamic" political trend. He is respected on both sides as a bridge between the movements. Sobhi Saleh, the Brotherhood representative, was jailed for three days during the protests.

The military is pushing ahead with a quick transition. Generals on the council said the military wants to hand power to a government and elected president within six months, the firmest timetable yet outlined. The constitutional panel has 10 days to propose its changes to be put to a referendum. In Washington, President Barack Obama praised Egypt's military council for working toward elections and a return of civilian control."Egypt's going to require help in building democratic institutions, for strengthening an economy that's taken a hit. So far, at least, we're seeing the right signals coming out of Egypt," Obama said. The potential that the Brotherhood will emerge from Egypt's upheaval with greater influence has worried many Egyptians. It also raised alarms in neighboring Israel and among some in the United States, fearing a spread of islamic militancy in the region. During his 29 years in power, Mubarak stoked such concerns at home and abroad, depicting his authoritarian grip as the only thing standing between Egypt and a Brotherhood takeover.

But many in Egypt contend the Brotherhood's strength is exaggerated. Police crackdowns on the group raised sympathy for it in some quarters. Government restrictions kept liberal opposition parties weak, meaning the Brotherhood was the only organized vehicle for action against the regime. Public apathy at elections made the more motivated pro-Brotherhood voters loom larger."If the freedom to create political parties is seriously allowed, the Muslim Brotherhood will be part of the scene, but just not all the scene as they were in the past regime," said Ammar Ali Hassan, an Egyptian expert on islamic movements. Last week, Obama played down the Brotherhood's power, calling it only "one faction in Egypt" that does not enjoy majority support. The wave of protests that ousted Mubarak may have hurt the Brotherhood's popularity, as well. The group initially balked at joining the demonstrations when they began Jan. 25, until its younger cadres forced its leadership to join, fearing they would be left behind.

Hundreds of thousands from across the spectrum of Egyptian society joined the protests. Brotherhood youth were a major source of manpower and organizational experience, but they never became the majority. Those crowds are now energized to participate in Egyptian politics, said Diaa Rashwan, a political analyst with Al-Ahram Center for Strategic and Political Studies."Egypt before Jan. 25 is completely different from an post-Jan. 25 Egypt," he said. "The Muslim Brotherhood is in a state of shock because they have discovered that the developments happening around them in society aren't what they had imagined." "In the upcoming elections, we are expecting huge numbers of people to show up to vote, a new generation. No one knows where it's going to go, and I don't expect it to go to the Muslim Brotherhood," he said.

Still, the Brotherhood, founded in the 1920s, would enter as a strong contender in a multiparty democracy, if that's the ultimate result of Egypt's turmoil. The Brotherhood has long been the most organized opposition movement. Though banned since 1954, the Brotherhood ran candidates for parliament as independents. In 2005, it made a strong showing, winning 20 percent of parliament. But it was pushed out completely in the November and December elections, largely because of widespread vote-rigging. The group is eager to have a legitimate role after decades of suppression under Mubarak, whose regime arrested thousands of its members in regular crackdowns. The Brotherhood said Tuesday it would form a party once promised freer laws are in place. "The Muslim Brotherhood group believes in the freedom of the formation of political parties. They are eager to have a political party," spokesman Mohammed Mursi said in a statement on the Brotherhood's website.

Essam el-Erian, a senior leader in the Brotherhood, said the movement would not run any candidate for upcoming presidential elections, acknowledging that such a move would be too controversial."We are also not targeting to have a majority in the upcoming parliament. This is a time for solidarity, unity, we need a national consensus," he told Associated Press Television News. He said the Brotherhood's top leadership, the Shoura Council, had decided on the creation of a party. "Now it is time to organize ourselves and for others to have the opportunity to organize themselves in political parties," he said. The Brotherhood advocates implementing islamic shariah law in Egypt, though it is far less radical than Afghanistan's former Taleban rulers and less restrictive and puritanical than the Wahhabi school of islam that reigns in US ally Saudi Arabia.

Some in Egypt fear it would take steps like imposing the islamic headscarf on women - already almost universal among Egyptian Muslims - or banning alcohol. The Brotherhood renounced violence in the 1970s, but supports its Palestinian offshoot Hamas in its "resistance" against Israel. The group is staunchly anti-Israel, but Brotherhood leaders say they don't seek the breaking of Egypt's 1979 peace deal with Israel. Al-Qaeda, which includes Egyptian Ayman el-Zawahri among its leadership, despises the Brotherhood, accusing it of compromising by renouncing violence and running in elections.

Since his fall, Mubarak has been hidden away at one of his palaces in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, some 250 miles from Cairo, reportedly in worsening health. Two Cairo newspapers said Mubarak was refusing to take medication, depressed and repeatedly passing out. There was no immediate confirmation of the reports. Mubarak had surgery in Germany last year to remove his gallbladder.

Mubarak's stranglehold on Egyptian politics went beyond suppressing the Brotherhood. Any opposition parties had to be approved by a commission run by his ruling National Democratic Party. The constitution stiffly restricts who can run for president, preventing a real challenger. It also lifted judicial supervision of elections, making vote-rigging easier. As a result, the existing political parties are hollow shells, with little public following.

The constitutional panel is limited to changing or annulling the six articles that consecrate those rules, "along with changes to any connected articles that the committee deems necessary," according to the military's order to its members. The constitution has been suspended by the military council.

Protest organizers and many other pro-democracy activists [including the libertarians] want far wider changes, demanding the constitution be thrown out completely and rewritten to loosen the heavily presidential system that put vast powers in the hands of Mubarak. Many advocate a more parliamentary system. Under the military's plans, any deeper changes would have to be made by a new, elected parliament. "After the transition to a democratic life and freedoms, parties and political forces can get together and work on a complete constitution," said Saleh, the Brotherhood member on the panel.

Meanwhile, the military urged an end to the labor strikes spreading wildly across the country since last week and hitting many government offices and industries. The strikes, though they eased Tuesday because of an islamic holiday, have further damaged Egypt's economy. In a move likely to deepen the economic crisis, state TV said the Central Bank of Egypt ordered banks to remain closed Wednesday and Thursday, the last two days of the business week. The stock market has been closed for three weeks and there is no word on when it will reopen. It lost about 17 percent of its value in two sessions after protests began. The Supreme Council warned that continuing strikes and protests would be "disastrous," the state news agency MENA reported.

"Perhaps the 'continuing strikes and protests would be "disastrous,"' for the economical plutarchists/capitalists, including the autocratic ruling generals, but not for the Egyptian people!!!", a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section, said to AIIS, also adding: "We will comment on changes to the constitution tomorrow..."

16.02.2011. Marginal constitutional changes to referendum are a mockery of the people. The people want the best of Norway, Switzerland and Iceland's constitutions, and secular with an Egyptian touch now. Stop the MB from " taking a Hamas" now!

Yesterday Associated Press reported the following about a new constitution and referendum in Egypt:

"Mubarak's stranglehold on Egyptian politics went beyond suppressing the Brotherhood. Any opposition parties had to be approved by a commission run by his ruling National Democratic Party. The constitution stiffly restricts who can run for president, preventing a real challenger. It also lifted judicial supervision of elections, making vote-rigging easier. As a result, the existing political parties are hollow shells, with little public following.

The constitutional panel is limited to changing or annulling the six articles that consecrate those rules, "along with changes to any connected articles that the committee deems necessary," according to the military's order to its members. The constitution has been suspended by the military council.

Protest organizers and many other pro-democracy activists [including the libertarians] want far wider changes, demanding the constitution be thrown out completely and rewritten to loosen the heavily presidential system that put vast powers in the hands of Mubarak. Many advocate a more parliamentary system. Under the military's plans, any deeper changes would have to be made by a new, elected parliament. "After the transition to a democratic life and freedoms, parties and political forces can get together and work on a complete constitution," said Saleh, the Brotherhood member on the panel."

"Seems like the Muslim Brotherhood and the military junta are "one hand" regarding postponing real changes to the constitution. This indicates that the Muslim Brotherhood can buy the joker, the Military, in the Egyptian political game, and makes it possible for the Brotherhood to "take a Hamas" in an Egyptian way.

The Brotherhood has plans to keep a low profile in the first elections of parliament and president, according to their leaders. However the aspirations of the people are high, and they may very well be disappointed and lose hope with the economic and political/administrative results after the first election. People without hope and very frustrated may buy the Brotherhood's slogan "Islam is the solution" so they get a majority in the parliament and the president in the next elections. If the Brotherhood then can buy the joker, the Military, which is likely, we have an islamist state in Egypt "democratically elected". Then the ultra-authoritarian, totalitarian islamist hell will soon start, and we get a Hamas-rule like situation in Egypt - dictatorship with practically no way out. Remember also Hitler and Hamas were "democratically elected".

We declare: Marginal constitutional changes to referendum are a mockery of the people. The people want the best of Norway, Switzerland and Iceland's constitutions, and secular with an Egyptian touch now, and should have this option in the referendum now. Stop the Muslim Brotherhood from "taking a Hamas" now. It is perhaps not possible later!" said a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section to AIIS

Meanwhile the industrial actions against the economic plutarchy continue. Associated Press reports: Egypt's Health Ministry says at least 365 killed in anti-government unrest; strikes continue. At least 365 people died in the 18 days of anti-government protests that pushed out longtime Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak, the Health Ministry said Wednesday in the first official accounting of the death toll. Minister Ahmed Sameh Farid said it was only a preliminary count of civilians killed and did not include police or prisoners. And while Mubarak is gone, frustration with the quality of life - from working conditions to environmental concerns - has kept demonstrators in the streets as the economy continues to falter.

Airport employees protested for better pay Wednesday, textile workers went on strike to demand a corruption probe and residents of a Suez Canal city pressed for the closing of a chemical factory they say is dumping toxic waste into a lake. The ruling military council issued its second statement in three days calling for an immediate halt to all labor actions. The new warning raised expectations of an outright ban on protests and strikes that could easily raise the tension between authorities and the protest movement.

"We urge citizens and members of professional and labor unions to go on with their jobs, each in their position," a text message sent to Egyptian cell phones from the military said. So far, the warnings have been defied by people airing grievances everywhere over just about everything, from meager wages to police brutality and corruption. One of the youth groups that helped organize the uprising tweeted Wednesday: "Strikes and protests should NOT stop." The group also promoted a planned march this Friday to Cairo's Tahrir Square, the democracy movement's key gathering point.

The council that took power from Mubarak, the result of the protests that began Jan. 25, says all the strikes and unrest are hampering efforts to salvage the economy and return the nation to normal life. Egypt's economy has been in virtual paralysis with the labor unrest, extended bank and stock market closures and an evaporation of tourism - a key source of income for the country. Banks were closed Wednesday and will be again Thursday, the last day of the business week in Egypt. There was no word on whether they would reopen Sunday, the start of the business week. The stock market has been closed for the past three weeks and, again, and it's uncertain when it will resume operating. The market lost nearly 17 percent of its value in two tumultuous sessions in late January before it was ordered shut to halt the slide.

While the economy sags, a wide array of groups are making it known they want change now. Hundreds of airport employees protested inside the arrivals terminal at Cairo International Airport to press demands for better wages and health coverage. The protest did not disrupt flights. In the industrial Nile Delta city of Mahallah al-Koubra, workers from Egypt's largest textile factory went on strike over pay and calls for an investigation into alleged corruption at the factory, according to labor rights activist Mustafa Bassiouni.

More than 60 women's and community groups condemned the new panel formed by the Armed Forces Supreme Council to amend Egypt's constitution, saying it is an all-male group which "excludes half of society." "This casts doubt on the future of democratic transformation in Egypt after the revolution, and raises questions about ... whether the revolution was seeking to free the whole society or only certain segments," the statement said.

In Port Said, a coastal city at the northern tip of the Suez Canal, about 1,000 people demonstrated to demand that a chemical factory be closed because it was dumping waste in a lake near the city. In the wake of protests Monday and Wednesday outside the office of the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, a spokeswoman for the group said it has started giving each refugee a small, one-time payment to help with their immediate needs. The refugees demonstrating at the UNHCR office on the outskirts of Cairo complained they have been stuck in Egypt for several years, sometimes as long as a decade. Wilkes said there are some 40,000 registered refugees in the country, many from East Africa.

The European Union said Wednesday that its foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton would visit Egypt next week after the Egyptian Foreign Ministry asked the international community for aid. Ashton, already in the region, would be the most senior foreign official to come to Cairo since Mubarak's Feb. 11 ouster. Details of her visit and who she would meet while in Cairo were yet to be announced. There was one crumb of good news for Egyptian authorities. The country's chief archaeologist announced the recovery of three of 18 pieces reported missing from the famed Egyptian Museum during the anti-Mubarak uprising."God almighty saved the antiquities from this hell because God loves Egypt," Antiquities Minister Zahi Hawass said.

Associated Press continued in another article: Virtually every sector has seen stoppages or protests, from the airlines to textiles and steel to ship repair services along the Suez Canal. The ruling military council that took power from Mubarak on Friday has issued two statements in the past three days calling for all labor unrest to end immediately. That has raised expectations that the council may soon ban all protests and strikes, something that would almost certainly raise tensions at a time when many are already feeling anxious about Egypt's uncertain future.

"Except for the glimpse of anarchy - real democracy when Mubarak left, i.e. just a revolutionary moment or a symbolic revolution, see the report of 13.02.2011, there are no significant changes in the Egyptian system's coordinates on the economic-political map so far, and thus in reality just a revolt, and no real revolution, i.e. with substance, yet!"said a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section to AIIS

There were also anti-government demonstrations in Libya, Bahrain, Jordan, Yemen and Iraq on Wednesday.

17.02.2011. The industrial actions against the economic plutarchy in Egypt continue. Associated Press reports: Egypt's Suez Canal workers stage protest over pay. At least 1,500 workers from the Suez Canal Authority protested Thursday in three Egyptian cities alongside the strategic waterway, demanding better pay and working conditions. The workers, however, vowed their protest would not disrupt traffic through the waterway. The workers, mainly administrative and technical employees with the canal authority, said they were not receiving the required government pay increases and that the authority adopts a two-tiered system that provides better benefits to professional employees. About 500 people protested in front of the authority's headquarters in the city of Ismailia east of Cairo. there were similar protests in Suez to the south and Port Said to the north.

The canal links the Red Sea and the Mediterranean and spares shipping the long journey around Africa to reach the Atlantic or the Indian oceans. About one million barrels of oil is shipped through the canal daily. Also Thursday, security officials said Egyptian security forces have deployed along a pipeline in the northern part of the Sinai Peninsula that carries natural gas to Israel. The area - long known for resistance to government control - has witnessed a security void during the unrest surrounding the 18 days of massive street protests that began Jan. 25 and led to the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak on Feb. 11. At least 1,500 workers from the Suez Canal Authority protested Thursday in three Egyptian cities alongside the strategic waterway, demanding better pay and working conditions. The workers, however, vowed their protest would not disrupt traffic through the waterway.

[As mentioned] on Feb. 5, assailants bombed a gas terminal in the area, disrupting the flow of gas to Israel and Jordan. Armed groups have also bombed the state security building in Rafah on the border with Gaza and attacked and lit fire to police stations and other government facilities throughout the region. Security and hospital officials say about 35 people have been killed in the clashes, two-thirds of them police. Northern Sinai is home to Bedouin tribes who resist government control. Officials say tribesmen have joined forces with islamic militants, some of whom escaped from prisons during the uprising. The security officials said Thursday that soldiers have been taking up positions along the pipeline since Tuesday. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

Meanwhile: Riot police storm Bahrain camp; 4 reported dead, Thousands of Yemenis protest nationwide, Egyptian troops protect Sinai gas line to Israel, Egyptian women's issues highlighted by Logan case, WH official: Obama calls reporter Logan after Egypt attack, Algeria PM: state of emergency gone by month's end.

Recent development in Libya. BBC reports: Activists call for 'day of anger'. Anti-government activists in Libya have been using social networking sites to rally support for protests on what they are describing as a "day of anger". There were reports of clashes in two cities late on Wednesday, with about four people reported dead in the eastern city of al-Bayda. Dozens of people were injured in violent demonstrations on Tuesday night in the eastern city of Benghazi. The unrest there followed the detention of an outspoken government critic. Pro-democracy protests have recently swept through several Arab nations, with the presidents of Tunisia and Egypt forced to resign amid growing unrest. But this week's demonstrations were the first display of defiance in Libya, where dissent is rarely tolerated.

'The revolution continues!' It is not clear what kind of response there has been to the call for more protests on Thursday. The New York-based organisation Human Rights Watch said 14 people had been arrested in connection with the planned demonstrations.  Gaddafi supporters held rallies in Benghazi and other Libyan cities, state TV reported. A pro-government rally is now taking place in Green Square in the centre of the capital Tripoli, with reports of students arriving from outside the city. The demonstrators have been shouting: "We are defending Gaddafi and the revolution!" and "The revolution continues!" Apart from the square the city is said to be calm, with banks and shops open as normal.

Wednesday's unrest occurred in other cities. A newspaper connected to one of Libyan leader Col Muammar Gaddafi's sons, Libya al-Yawm, showed the police station in al-Bayda on fire. There are a number of unconfirmed reports of the government opening fire on the protesters on Wednesday. Reports on social networks talk of government forces possibly firing from helicopters on to the crowds. Other sources said snipers were used. Exiled groups say at least four people were killed but figures are impossible to verify. Witnesses say that at one stage up to 2,000 people were involved in the protests early on Wednesday in Benghazi, which saw a march on government offices in the city. The protesters are said to have thrown stones and petrol bombs and set vehicles alight. Witnesses said police used rubber bullets and water cannon to disperse them. The protests reportedly began after the arrest of Fathi Terbil, who represents relatives of more than 1,000 prisoners allegedly massacred by security forces in Tripoli's Abu Salim jail in 1996. He was later said to have been freed.

In a speech broadcast on Wednesday evening, Col Gaddafi made no mention of the unrest but said the "revolutionaries" would prevail. "Down with the enemies, down with them everywhere; down with the puppets everywhere, the puppets are falling, the autumn leaves are falling!" he said. "The puppets of the USA, the puppets of Zionism are falling." In a statement issued after the Benghazi clashes, a senior Libyan official warned that the authorities "will not allow a group of people to move around at night and play with the security of Libya". It added: "The clashes last night were between small groups of people - up to 150. Some outsiders infiltrated that group. They were trying to corrupt the local legal process which has long been in place. "We will not permit that at all, and we call on Libyans to voice their issues through existing channels, even if it is to call for the downfall of the government," said the official, who was not identified.

Some facts about Libya: Muammar Gaddafi, 68, has been in power since 1969. Ranks 146 out of 178 on corruption. A population with a median age of 24.2 years, and a literacy rate of 88%. In the evening BBC reported: "To recap the situation in Libya: In Tripoli, pro-government demonstrators have been rallying in the streets. In several towns, there have been anti-government protests, which eyewitnesses say have been suppressed. Dissidents say at least six people have been killed."

Bahrain in the evening. BBC reports: Hundreds of demonstrators are still gathered under porch of casualty department at Salmaniya Hospital in Bahrain. They are chanting defiance against government. All are tired, many seem shocked. A common theme - last night's deadly violence has hardened attitudes towards the regime. Ammar Hussain Ali in Bahrain, says: "My mother went to the hospital to give blood. She said there were 4,000 people gathered there. People were angry, shouting 'down with the government', 'it's over now' and 'we want peace in Bahrain'. My mother said that there were policemen around the hospital with guns, mixing with the crowds."

Protests have been banned in Bahrain and the military has been ordered to tighten its grip after the violent removal of anti-government demonstrators, state TV reports. The army would take every measure necessary to preserve security, the interior ministry said. Three people died and 231 were injured when police broke up the main protest camp, said Bahrain's health minister. The unrest comes amid a wave of protest in the Middle East and North Africa. Bahrain's demonstrators want wide-ranging political reforms and had been camped out in the capital, Manama, since Tuesday.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton expressed Washington's "deep concern" in a call to the Bahraini foreign minister on Thursday. Mrs Clinton "urged restraint moving forward. They discussed political and economic reform efforts to respond to the citizens of Bahrain," a state department official told the BBC. Police action was necessary to pull Bahrain back from the "brink of a sectarian abyss", Bahraini Foreign Minister Khaled bin Ahmed al-Khalifa said on Thursday. Bahrain's Shia Muslim majority has been ruled by a Sunni Muslim royal family since the 18th Century. The announcement on state television said the army had taken control of "key parts" of the city.

Tanks, army patrols and military checkpoints are out on key streets, with helicopters deployed overhead. Barbed wire has been erected on roads leading to the main protest area, Pearl Square, and the interior ministry has warned people to stay off the streets. Protesters and opposition politicians expressed outrage at the violence of the crackdown. A leader of the main minority Shia opposition, Abdul Jalil Khalil, said 18 MPs were resigning in protest. Ibrahim Sharif, of Bahrain's secular Waad party, told the BBC the protests would continue. "We are going to do what's necessary to change this into a democratic country, even if some of us lose our lives," he said. "We want a proper, functioning, constitutional democracy." [Apropos constitution, see the report of 16.02.2011.]

Mr Sharif said the riot police had moved into Pearl Square at about 03.00 (00.00 GMT) as people were sleeping. Hundreds of protesters were injured. Bahrain's authorities defended their actions. Finance Minister Sheikh Ahmed Bin Mohammed Al Khalifa told the BBC up to 70 police officers had been hurt. "When (the police) first went in, they went in without any intention to harm anybody, just to move the people who were occupying the roundabout and blocking traffic," Sheikh Al Khalifa said. "Some of those people left but some of those people came back and fought." He added: "I think restraint is being used."

But many protesters said there had been no warning about the raid. On Thursday morning there were angry scenes outside Manama's main hospital, Salmaniya, as hundreds of people gathered, some answering calls to donate blood and others defacing images of the Bahraini royal family. The crackdown has caused unease in the West. Bahrain is a key UK and US ally and hosts the US Navy's Fifth Fleet. UK Foreign Secretary William Hague condemned the violent clashes, calling on Bahrain's government to "exercise restraint". Britain has also said it will review its licences for arms exports to Bahrain. The UK has sold tear gas and riot control equipment to Bahrain, but the Foreign Offices says these licences will be revoked if it is found those arms were used to facilitate internal repression.

Since independence from the UK in 1971, tensions between the Sunni elite and the less affluent Shia have frequently caused civil unrest. Shia groups say they are marginalised, subject to unfair laws, and repressed. The conflict lessened in 1999 when Sheikh Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa became emir. He began a cautious process of democratic reform. In 2002, he proclaimed himself king and landmark elections were held. But the opposition boycotted the polls because the appointed upper chamber of parliament was given equal powers to the elected lower chamber.

The BBC's Kim Ghattas's thoughts on Hillary Clinton's comments: "On a visit to the kingdom in December, Mrs Clinton had said she was impressed by the commitment the government had shown to walking on the democratic path. She has not retracted that statement in the wake of the violence but said Bahrain needed real and meaningful reforms."

Associated Press reported: Bahrain official: Crackdown was 'regrettable'. Foreign Minister Khalid Al Khalifa said the violence was "regrettable." While the protests began as a cry for the country's Sunni monarchy to loosen its grip, the uprising's demands have steadily grown bolder. Many protesters called for the government to provide more jobs and better housing, free all political detainees and abolish the system that offers Bahraini citizenship to Sunnis from around the Middle East. Increasingly, protesters also chanted slogans to wipe away the entire ruling dynasty that has led Bahrain for more than 200 years and is firmly backed by the Sunni sheiks and monarchs across the Gulf.

The stability of Bahrain's government is seen as crucial by its other allies in the Gulf, who - though they rarely say it in public - see Bahrain's Shiite majority as the weak link in their unity against Iranian influence. Hard-liners in Iran have often expressed kinship and support for Bahrain's Shiites. But in Bahrain, the community staunchly denies being a tool of Tehran, saying their complaints are rooted in their country's unbalanced system. Although Bahrain is sandwiched between OPEC heavyweights Saudi Arabia and Qatar, it has limited oil resources and depends heavily on its role as a regional financial hub and playground for Saudis, who can drive over a causeway to enjoy Bahrain's Western-style bars, hotels and beaches. The unrest could threaten the opening next month of Formula One racing, one of the centerpieces of Bahrain's claims for international prestige. The GP2 Asia Series race, due to start Friday on the same circuit used by Formula One, was called off at the request of the Bahrain Motorsport Federation "due to force majeure," race organizers announced Thursday.

Social networking websites had been abuzz Wednesday with calls to press ahead with the protests. They were matched by insults from presumed government backers who called the demonstrators traitors and agents of Iran. The protest movement's next move is unclear. Before the attack on the square, protesters had called for major rallies after Friday prayers. The reported deaths, however, could become a fresh rallying point. Thousands of mourners had turned out for the funeral processions of two other people killed in the protests earlier in the week. After prayers Wednesday evening, a Shiite imam in the square had urged Bahrain's youth not to back down. "This square is a trust in your hands and so will you whittle away this trust or keep fast?" the imam said. "So be careful and be concerned for your country and remember that the regime will try to rip this country from your hand but if we must leave it in coffins then so be it!"

Across the city, government supporters in a caravan of cars waved national flags and displayed portraits of the king. "Come join us!" they yelled into markets and along busy streets. "Show your loyalty." Thousands of mourners turned out Wednesday for the funeral procession of 31-year-old Fadhel al-Matrook, one of two people killed Monday in the protests. Later, in Pearl Square, his father Salman pleaded with protesters not to give up. "He is not only my son. He is the son of Bahrain, the son of this nation," he yelled. "His blood shouldn't be wasted."

Also in the evening. Egypt arrests former interior minister Habib El-Adly for alleged corruption, according officials. The arrest of Mr Adly makes three ministers now under arrest - former tourism minister Zuheir Garana and former housing minister Ahmed al-Maghrabi were held earlier on suspicion of diverting public funds.

Associated Press reports about severe ochlarhy: Security remains shaky in Egypt after revolt. Families in quiet Cairo suburbs are investing heavily in locks and steel doors. Fake checkpoints set up by hardened criminals who escaped prisons terrorize travelers on highways. Thousands of looted firearms have flooded the black market. Egypt's political upheaval has been followed by an unprecedented breakdown of security, with few police on the streets and the army unable to fill the vacuum. Some Egyptians who have just seen their longtime authoritarian ruler Hosni Mubarak overthrown by a popular uprising are already nostalgic for his police state.

Egypt's security forces, including police, number at least 500,000, slightly more than the armed forces. Though hated by Egyptians for their heavy handedness and rampant corruption, they had kept the country relatively safe. That was the case before they mysteriously disappeared from the streets Jan. 28 following deadly clashes with protesters whose massive anti-government demonstrations forced Mubarak to step down. The cabinet member in charge of the police at the time, former Interior Minister Habib el-Adly, was arrested Thursday pending the completion of an investigation into corruption allegations leveled against him. El-Adly, whose job gave him control over the security forces, has been widely blamed for the deadly brutality used by riot police against demonstrators.

About 50 percent of the police force nationwide is now back on the streets and security officials speak of at least another two months before the force could be back in its full strength. Another problem, they say, is that the police have been demoralized by the tidal wave of resentment they now face over their brutality in confronting the protesters. In the early days of the uprising, neighborhood protection committees were set up across the nation in response to the lawlessness. Youths armed themselves with knifes, baseball bats, golf clubs and hunting rifles and manned checkpoints to protect property. But the committees have mostly vanished now and the police are back on the streets, though below their normal numbers.

The security situation has dramatically improved since those days in late January and early February when looting, arson and armed robberies swept the country. But conditions are far from normal. So, for now, many Egyptians find themselves in a situation where they have to fend for themselves. Egypt has not experienced such a total collapse of law and order since 1986, when police conscripts went on a rampage for several days, looting and setting property ablaze before the army quelled their revolt. For days after the initial outbreak of looting and arson, families in remote suburbs stayed home, stacked up furniture behind doors and hurriedly commissioned steel doors and windows. Many go to sleep with a large kitchen knife or a gun on their bedside tables. Others take turns sleeping so at least one family member is awake to sound the alarm if intruders come into the house.

Stores sold out of locks and bolts within days and the price of firearms in licensed stores skyrocketed in the face of increased demand. In a neighborhood in Giza, a province that partially belongs to Cairo, residents worried about their property and personal safety were handed firearms by the local police station if they left their identity cards as insurance. In parts of the country, the security vacuum was taken advantage of by groups with a grudge against the police or the local officials of the hated state security agency.

The Bedouins of northern Sinai are a case in point. The area is home to Bedouin tribes who resist government control, and officials there say tribesmen have joined forces with islamic militants, some of whom escaped from prisons during the uprising. Armed groups have bombed the state security building in Rafah on the border with the Palestinian Gaza Strip, and set fire to police stations. Security and hospital officials say about 35 people have been killed in clashes between the two sides, about two-thirds of them police, since Jan. 25 when the anti-Mubarak protests began.

Mohammed Hassan, a 23-year-old dental student, got his Beretta pistol out of his safe when he heard rumors about the looting in his upscale Cairo neighborhood. He gave it to his 25-year-old sister when he stepped out to see what was going on in his neighborhood. "I gave it to her because there were no police around," he said. "I was just worried, and my sister lives with me, and she was alone. I told her 'Just in case anything happens,' and showed her where the safety was, and how to take it off." Residents in a new compound east of Cairo bought firearms and guard dogs immediately after they learned that escaped inmates found refuge in some of the unfinished homes. The owners of a large and glitzy shopping mall on the western outskirts of Cairo have sealed off the entrances of the glass-and-steel facility with cement walls and hired Security guards with sniffing dogs.

On Sunday, a gang of heavily armed men stormed a prison in a suburb east of Cairo and freed nearly 600 inmates, according to the security officials, who said the attackers were hired by drug dealers who wanted to free associates serving long jail terms. A similar attempt was made Tuesday in the province of Minyah south of Cairo but was foiled by the guards, said the officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because they not authorized to brief the media. In Both cases, said the officials, the attacks were timed with rioting inside the prisons by inmates who set mattresses and blankets ablaze to distract the guards from the attacking gunmen.

Of the estimated 23,000 inmates who broke out of six jails so far, 10,000, mostly hardened criminals who were serving long jail terms, remain at large. Security officials say some of the escapees don police uniforms and set up fake checkpoints at isolated parts of highways and even on a main road linking the southern and eastern parts of the Egyptian capital that is known as the "autostrad." The wave of crime has been exacerbated by the influx of thousands of firearms into the black market following the storming of the jails and looting of the rifles and guns used by the guards.

Additionally, 99 police stations across the country, 36 of them in Cairo, have been stormed and looted by criminal gangs since security collapsed Jan. 28 when police mysteriously pulled back from the streets and the army stepped in to fill the vacuum and restore law and order. Initially, an automatic rifle that normally sells for about $4,000 was sold for $200 and a handgun fetched about $100, or less than 10 percent of its actual price. Later, when it became known that firearms were in much demand, the prices went up dramatically. The lawlessness also has crept into real estate. Low-income apartments built by the Housing Ministry or local governments have been seized by criminal gangs and poor families looking to move from shanty towns. Owners of farmland in rural areas hurriedly built homes on their land in violation of building restrictions.

"The present severe ochlarchy in Egypt is dangerous both because it is an evil in itself and because it falsely legitimates 'strong man' rule and a police state, and it should be stopped as soon as possible compatible with real democracy! Arrest the ochlarchists NOW!!" said a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section to AIIS, and added: "There are many reports about political prisoners, non-ochlarchical protesters, still detained in Egypt. Release all political prisoners, NOW!!! Severe criminals at large and innocent political prisoners in jail, as in Egypt now, that is a police state as far as we know... Do away with the police state in Egypt NOW!!!!"  

18.02.2011. With lots of innocent protesters held as hostages in jail by the Egyptian police state of the military junta, thousands are celebrating the fall of Hosni Mubarak in a "Friday of Victory and Continuation" at Tahrir Square. In Bahrain mourners call for toppling of monarchy.

Egyptians by the thousands gathered for prayers Friday at Tahrir Square, and to mark the fall of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak a week ago. The groups that sparked the 18-day revolt that led to Mubarak's downfall are calling this the "Friday of Victory and Continuation," a name reflecting both their pride in forcing a change in national leadership and their worries about the future. People streamed into the square, even though a main access road was blocked by an army jeep and a barricade, and those entering on foot had to present identification to soldiers.

The atmosphere was festive, in keeping with the aim of the event, which was to maintain the upbeat spirit of the earlier protests. Families brought their children and some flag-draped Egyptians clapped or played musical instruments as they waited for prayers to begin. Organizers planned a lineup of bands in the afternoon, while an ad agency was looking to shoot footage to promote Egypt's tourism industry, which has been hard hit by the nation's political tumult. Among those waiting in line was a group of about 30 activists from the "Visit Egypt" campaign. They wore matching T-shirts with the slogan "Support Freedom, Visit Egypt" printed on the front.

Despite Friday's festivities, the situation in Egypt remains unsettled amid worries the military council running the country won't implement promised reforms. Banks and the stock market have been shuttered, and the military has twice warned Egyptians not to strike, so far in vain. Even so, as mentioned, at least 1,500 employees of the Suez Canal Authority protested for better pay, housing and benefits Thursday in three cities - just one example of workers nationwide using this opportunity to voice long-held grievances. Industrial actions against the economic plutarchy will probably continue.

In Bahrain mourners call for toppling of monarchy. Thousands of mourners called for the downfall of Bahrain's ruling monarchy as burials began Friday after a deadly assault on pro-reform protesters that has brought army tanks into the streets of one of the most strategic Western allies in the Gulf. The cries against Bahrain's king and his inner circle reflect an escalation of the demands from a political uprising that began just with calls to weaken the Sunni monarchy's hold on top government posts and address claims of discrimination against the Shiite majority in the tiny island nation.

The mood appears to have turned toward defiance of the entire ruling system after the brutal attack Thursday on a protest encampment in Bahrain's capital, Manama, which left at least five dead according to updated figures, more than 230 injured and put the nation under emergency-style footing with military forces in key areas and checkpoints on main roadways. Outside a village mosque, several thousand mourners gathered to bury three men killed in the crackdown. The first body, covered in black velvet, was passed hand to hand toward a grave as it was being dug.

Egypt a bit later: Tens of thousands of flag-waving Egyptians packed into Tahrir Square for a day of prayer and celebration to mark the fall of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak a week ago and to maintain pressure on the new military rulers to steer the country toward democratic reforms. According to the Associated Press, influential Egyptian cleric Sheik Youssef el-Qaradawi led Friday prayers at the square, hailing the uprising and saying "the illegitimate can never defeat the truth." "I congratulate the youth," he said. "They knew that the revolution will win in the end." "The revolution is not over, until we have a new Egypt," he added.

The atmosphere was festive, as organizers hoped it would be, maintaining the upbeat spirit of the earlier protests. A military-style brass band marched through the crowd, while a few vendors sold vuvuzelas, the buzzing horns that became the soundtrack to the World Cup in South Africa last summer. "We came here because we are excited about Egypt and the revolution," said 48-year-old Ashraf Abdel-Azim, who made his way to the square with his wife, Nadwa, and their 9-year-old son, Ahmed. "We want freedom and change, so we are happy to see it coming."

His wife had prepared a handwritten cardboard sign. "The people want to cleanse the country of corruption," it read. The three young children of Nizar Mohammad and his wife, Rasha, were caught up in the patriotic fervor of the moment with Egypt's red, white and black flag painted on their faces. They carried small flags, too. "We want our kids to see where all of this happened," Rasha Mohammad said. In one area of the vast plaza, a monument to those killed in the uprising - the Health Ministry has said at least 365 civilians died - had been erected. Many stopped before the monument, laying flowers on the ground or taking pictures of the pictures of those killed.

"Despite Friday's festivities, the situation in Egypt remains unsettled amid labor unrest and worries the military council running the country won't implement promised reforms," Associated Press reported, as usual anxious and worrying about the position and interests of the economical putarchists/capitalists... Typical for USA, remember Noam Chomsky's "Manufacturing Consent" and the "red lines" of American media, and to some extent all of the Anglophone World. AIIS of course reports in an opposite way, analyzing from the people's perspective in an objective, scientific, way.

Associated Press continued: Defense Minister Hussein Tantawi, head of the ruling council, hasn't even appeared in public since Mubarak stepped down under enormous pressure from the crowds that began protesting Jan. 25, and would not stop despite being attacked by pro-Mubarak forces. Supporters of the ousted president set up a Facebook page calling for a competing "rally in gratitude for President Hosni Mubarak."

Wael Hassan, a 32-year-old dentist who participated in the Cairo protests and witnessed major clashes on Jan. 28, went to Tahrir Square on Friday and captured the anxiety many Egyptians have about the future. "For me, it's not a celebration. It's a message to the army and the government that we're still here and we will still protest, that we won't stop until we see a civilian government, not a government appointed by Mubarak himself," he said, a reference to the former president's confidants in the transition government.

"The protests must continue until Egypt achieves real democracy!" said a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section to AIIS.

In the afteroon CNN reported that hundreds of thousands of people participated in the rally in Cairo, and also about major protests all over Egypt...

Meanwhile ad Libya BBC reported: Witnesses in the Libyan city of Benghazi say thousands of people have gathered for an anti-government protest outside the city's courthouse. There are also reports that some prisoners escaped from a city jail but that 100 were later arrested. Benghazi has been the scene of protests in recent days, with reports that at least 15 people were killed in clashes with security forces on Thursday. Large protests are rare in Libya, where dissent is seldom allowed. A leading pro-government newspaper, Al-Zahf Al-Akhdar, called for tough action against the protesters. "Any risk from these miniscule groups [protesters] - this people and the noble revolutionary power will violently and thunderously respond," the paper said. "The people's power [i.e. power over the people], the Jamahiriya [system of rule], the revolution, and Colonel Gaddafi are all red lines and those who try to cross or come near these lines are suicidal and playing with fire."

Pro-democracy protests have recently swept through several Arab nations, with the presidents of Tunisia and Egypt forced from power amid growing unrest. The US-based Human Rights Watch said at least 24 people had been killed across Libya in unrest on Wednesday and Thursday. Many others were wounded in the clashes between security forces and protesters, the campaign group said. Witnesses told the BBC there were no police at the protest at the courthouse, though security forces have been widely deployed around the city. The protesters said they planned to march to the hospital later to take 23 bodies to the cemetery. Other witness reports spoke of three deaths in clashes in another part of the city, and of more people killed elsewhere in Benghazi and al-Bayda.

In Bahrain security forces fire tear gas and heavy weapons at crowds of protesters, hours after those killed earlier are buried. Violence flared again in the center of Bahrain's capital Friday evening, as a confrontation between security forces and protesters resulted in several deaths and dozens of injuries. The government's actions prompted a denunciation from the White House. "I am deeply concerned by reports of violence," President Barack Obama said, mentioning Yemen and Libya as well as Bahrain. "The United States condemns the use of violence by governments against peaceful protesters in those countries and wherever else it may occur." At least four people were killed and others were wounded in the Bahrain clash, an ambulance worker told CNN. Medical sources at a hospital said at least 50 people were treated for injuries after clashes in Manama on Friday, and five of them were in critical condition, including one with a bullet wound to the head.

Some news now from Kuwait: Dozens of protesters are said to have been arrested in a big demonstration by stateless people demanding citizenship, Reuters reported.

Yemen. Medics tell the AFP news agency that there has been a third fatality in the southern Yemeni city of Aden. Witnesses say police opened fire when trying to disperse a protest demanding the resignation of President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

19.02.2011. Embryo-revolution now in Egypt. Veteran activist sees revolution as ongoing, the symbolic glimpse of anarchy 11.02.2011 removing Mubarak was just the start...

In the General resolution no 1 about the situation in Egypt, updated 11.02.2011 during the revolutionary glimps of anarchy, the Egyptian anarchists, The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section, declared: "Wild cheers after President Hosni Mubarak has stepped down. There is no real change of the system itself so far, but it may now change. Our work for a revolutionary change i.e. a revolution, of the Egyptian economic-political system in libertarian direction has now really started."

And 16.02.2011 The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section declared: "Except for the glimpse of anarchy - real democracy when Mubarak left, i.e. just a revolutionary moment or a symbolic revolution, see the report of 13.02.2011, there are no significant changes in the Egyptian system's coordinates on the economic-political map so far, and thus in reality just a revolt, and no real revolution, i.e. with substance, yet!"

Today The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section declared: "The revolution is by no means over, we have seen a glimpse of anarchy, a symbolic revolution, and no real revolution, i.e. with substance, yet. Our work for a revolutionary change i.e. a revolution, of the Egyptian economic-political system in libertarian direction continues. A real revolution means significant changes in the Egyptian system's coordinates on the economic-political map in libertarian direction. All in all the present situation of continued revolt is just an embryo-revolution, it may result in a) an abortion, an aborted revolution, or b) a real revolution, i.e. with substance. The revolution may in a way be seen as ongoing, but it is just an embryo-revolution - and no real revolution yet!"

The veteran Egyptian activist Hossam el-Hamalawy organized his first demonstration while still a student in 1998, then got arrested and tortured by Egyptian police two years later at age 23. Now he has seen the fall of the president he spent his adult life struggling against. For 33-year-old el-Hamalawy, though, Egypt's three-week youth revolution is by no means over - there remains a repressive state to be dismantled and workers who need to get their rights. "The job is unfinished, we got rid of (Hosni) Mubarak but we didn't get rid of his dictatorship, we didn't get rid of the state security police," he told the Associated Press while sipping strong Arabic coffee in a traditional downtown cafe that weeks before had been the scene of street battles.

The activism career of el-Hamalawy typifies the long, and highly improbable, trajectory of the mass revolt that ousted Mubarak, Egypt's long-entrenched leader. Once a dreamer organizing more or less on his own, el-Hamalawy's dreams suddenly hardened into reality. The next step, he says, is the Egyptian people must press their advantage. "This is phase two of the revolution," said el-Hamalawy, who works as a journalist for an English-language online Egyptian paper and runs the Arabawy blog, a clearing house for information on the country's fledgling independent labor movement - a campaign that has become increasingly assertive since the fall of the old government.

For years, activists in Egypt planted seeds - sometimes separately, sometimes in coordination - building networks and pushing campaigns on specific causes. They fought lonely fights: anti-war protests here, labor strikes there, an effort to raise awareness about police abuse, another to organize "Keep Our City Clean" trash collection. Then one day in late January, it all came together for them. They were part of a movement, hundreds of thousands strong. For three weeks, el-Hamalawy fought regime supporters and manned the barricades in Tahrir Square, but unlike the youth leaders who have come to prominence in the aftermath of the uprising, he refuses to talk to the generals now ruling Egypt and fears the uprising's momentum is being lost as everyone waits for the military to transition the country to a new government.

"Activists can take some rest from the protest and go back to their well-paying jobs for six months, waiting for the military to give us salvation, but the worker can't go back to his factory and still get paid 250 pounds," he said, referring to the wave of labor unrest sweeping the country as workers protest their abysmal wages. "The strikes now will continue, that's our only hope at the moment, the mission is not accomplished," el-Hamalawy said, sardonically echoing the triumphant tweet of one youth leader when Mubarak stepped down. Only a few years ago, activists could hardly dream that their actions might bring down the president and they rarely dared say it out loud. Those that did, like el-Hamalawy, were mocked as crazy dreamers.

When he went to interview for his first job after graduate school, about a decade ago at a local English-language magazine, he told the editor this was just a side show to his main goal of overthrowing the regime. The editor laughed but hired him anyway, often ridiculing his idealism and notions of popular revolution in the newsroom. Now, however, el-Hamalawy's vision of a vibrant labor movement shaking the country seems to be coming to pass - at least temporarily. Despite increasingly severe warnings from the generals running the show, factory workers and government employees across the country are hitting the streets.

Egypt's long-suppressed labor movement found a voice in December 2006, when the 26,000 workers at Mahalla Spinning and Weaving, north of Cairo, went on strike. The government acquiesced to their demands, but soon flurries of copy cat strikes were erupting across the country at other public and private sector factories. El-Hamalawy was first covering the disturbances as a journalist, then helping to mobilize them as an activist, working with veteran shop floor leaders at the factories to help organize the laborers and, most importantly, get their message out to the rest of the world. In the ensuing years, workers took up the mantle of challenging the status quo, after the crushing security presence in the big cities had largely suffocated the street protests that were once active in the first half of the decade.

"Because of my involvement in the labor movement I was playing the role of their international spokesperson in cases," he said, speaking the fluent English he gained from an education at the elite American University in Cairo. "The tax collectors were joking that I was their strike's foreign minister." Raised in the middle class suburb of Nasr City by an academic father and an artist mother, el-Hamalawy is a long way from working class, but he says labor organizers have welcomed his advice and help in their struggles. El-Hamalawy maintains that it was the eruption of strikes in the final days of the Tahrir Square uprising that prompted the generals to finally push out Mubarak after the protest seemed to have degenerated into a waiting game.

Those strikes are certainly a long way from his modest first protest, which was groundbreaking in its own way. El-Hamalawy convinced a few hundred AUC students to protest the 1998 US bombing of Iraq by marching off campus, something students hadn't done in decades. They were greeted by baton-wielding riot police. It was hard to say who was more surprised - the police that the elite students would leave the safety of their campus or the students themselves when security forces had the temerity to hit them. In those early days, protests could only be about foreign policy issues, and denouncing Mubarak was still a long way off. Over the next 10 years there was a gradual shift to from foreign to domestic issues.

"I still remember I would be chanting against Mubarak and there would be people silencing me, (saying) 'Don't get us in trouble,'" el-Hamalawy recalled. His activism finally brought him to the attention of the country's dreaded State Security, and one night in 2000 while was driving with his girlfriend, el-Hamalawy was cut off by two cars and snatched. Agents blindfolded him with his own Palestinian protest scarf, tied his hands behind his back and took him to their downtown headquarters where he remained for four days. He refused to answer their questions, and like so many activists before him, he was tortured and threatened with rape, electric shocks and deprived of sleep. "I would say I'm not going to speak and they would keep on beating me. Then they stripped off my clothes completely and they said I'm going to bring a gay soldier to rape you now," he recalled.

El-Hamalawy said he never did talk and was eventually released. He was taken twice more in the ensuing years, including in 2003 while walking with two American journalists in the aftermath of the anti-war protests. "The whole thing just damages you," he said. "I couldn't go to bed from three to five in the morning for years," because that's when the police raids would come. Rather than discourage him, though, the beatings solidified his resolve that the regime had to be brought down, and over the years even as he drifted from job to job, the late night blogging and labor organizing continued. His gaunt frame shows the effects of a sustained diet of coffee, cigarettes and no sleep. He looks much older than his years with gray shooting through his close-cropped curly hair and dark circles under his eyes.

His handsome face, however, still splits into a brilliant smile, energized by what's at least a partial victory against a regime that had seemed unbeatable. "It's easy to talk about (the beatings) now because I feel I partially took my revenge against those police officers," he said. "Since the police withdrew on that Friday, my mother has been saying, 'Now I have revenge for my son.'" El-Hamalawy's zeal has mellowed little over the years, and just like when he was talking about overthrowing the regime 10 years before it happened, his demands today seem a bit unrealistic - like investigating the now-ruling generals for their own links to corruption in the Mubarak era. But then a decade ago, no one would have thought Egypt's quiescent workers and civil servants would be taking to the streets.

"There is a revolutionary mood in the country and you need to push for those strikes," he said. "If you hold them back now we are actually screwed - those who carry out half a revolution dig their own graves." El-Hamalawy was quoting Louis Antoine Saint Just of the French Revolution, a choice that carries an historical warning of its own. Together with Robespierre, Saint Juste was executed in 1794 in the conservative backlash against the revolutionary reign of terror they initiated.

The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section declared: "The present situation of continued revolt in Egypt is just an embryo-revolution, it may result in a) an abortion, an aborted revolution, or b) a real revolution, i.e. with substance. The revolution may in a way be seen as ongoing, but it is just an embryo-revolution - and no real revolution yet. We call for an end of the present totalitarian right fascist regime of the military junta, and a steady and orderly movement of the Egyptian system towards real democracy, i.e. anarchy - a real revolution and continued increased libertarian degree, see System theory - Chapter V. B.!"

Libya, Yemen crack down; Bahrain pulls back tanks, Associated Press reports: Security forces fired on pro-democracy demonstrators Saturday in Libya and Yemen as the two hard-line regimes regimes struck back against the wave of protests that has already toppled autocrats in Egypt and Tunisia. At least 15 died when police shot into crowds of mourners in Libya's second largest city, a hospital official said. Bahrain's royal family bowed to international pressure, however, and pulled tanks off the street to allow protesters to camp once again in a central square. Libyans returned to the street for a fifth straight day of protest against Gadhafi's 42-year grip on power despite estimates by human rights groups of 84 deaths in the North African country - with 35 on Friday alone. But snipers fired on thousands of mourners in Benghazi, a focal point of unrest, as they attended the funerals of other protesters, a hospital official said. He spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisal.

Before dawn, special forces had attacked hundreds of demonstrators, including lawyers and judges, who were camped out in front of a courthouse in Benghazi, Libya's second-largest city. "They fired tear gas on protesters in tents and cleared the areas after many fled carrying the dead and the injured," one demonstrator said by phone. Authorities cut off the Internet across Libya, further isolating the country. Just after 2 a.m. local time in Libya, the US-based Arbor Networks security company detected a total cessation of online traffic. Protesters confirmed they could not get online.

Information is tightly controlled in Libya, where journalists cannot work freely, and activists this week have posted videos on the Internet that have been an important source of images of the revolt. Other information about the protests has come from opposition activists in exile. Gadhafi is facing the biggest popular uprising of his autocratic reign, with much of the action in the country's impoverished east. He's responded forcefully. A female protester in Tripoli, the capital city to the west, said it was much harder to demonstrate there. Police were out in force and Gadhafi was greeted rapturously when he drove through town in a motorcade on Thursday.

In Yemen's capital of Sanaa, riot police opened fire on thousands of protesters, killing one anti-government demonstrator and injuring five others on a 10th day of revolt against President Ali Abdullah Saleh, a key US ally who has been in power for three decades. As on other days earlier this week, protesters marching from Sanaa's university were met by police and government supporters with clubs and knives who engaged in a stone-throwing battle with the demonstrators. At one point, police fired in the air to disperse the march. A medical official said one man was shot in the neck and killed. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press. The death was the seventh this week in Yemen.

In a meeting with civic leaders, Saleh said Yemenis have the right to express themselves peacefully and that the perpetrators of the unrest were trying to seize power by fomenting instability. "The homeland is facing a foreign plot that threatens its future," Saleh said, without elaborating. Saleh, a key US ally in fighting al-Qaeda terrorists, has tried to blunt discontent by promising not to seek re-election when his term ends in 2013. But he is facing a restless population, with threats from al-Qaeda militants who want to oust him, a southern secessionist movement and a sporadic armed rebellion in the north. To try to quell new outbursts of dissent, Saleh pledged to meet some of the protesters' demands and has reached out to tribal chiefs, who are a major base of support for him.

In the tiny island nation of Bahrain, thousands of joyful protesters streamed back into the capital's central Pearl Square after the armed forces withdrew from the streets following two straight days of a bloody crackdown by security forces. The royal family, which was quick to use force earlier this week against demonstrators in the landmark square that has been the heart of the anti-government demonstrations, appeared to back away from further confrontation following international pressure. President Barack Obama discussed the situation with King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, asking him to hold those responsible for the violence accountable. He said in a statement that Bahrain must respect the "universal rights" of its people and embrace "meaningful reform."

British Foreign Secretary William Hague also expressed his concern about "clearly unacceptable and horrifying" violence against demonstrators in Bahrain. He urged Bahraini authorities to hold accountable those responsible for the deaths in protests there and to halt the intimidation of journalists. The demonstrators had emulated successful uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt in attempting to bring political change to Bahrain, home to the US Navy's 5th Fleet - the centerpiece of Washington's efforts to confront Iranian military influence in the region.

Crown Prince Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa, deputy supreme commander of the armed forces, appealed for calm and political dialogue in a brief address on state TV. As night fell, though, defiant protesters in Pearl Square erected barriers, wired a sound system, set up a makeshift medical tent and deployed lookouts to warn of approaching security forces. Protesters took over the square earlier in the week, setting up a camp with tents and placards, but they were driven out by riot police in a deadly assault Thursday that killed five people and injured more than 200. The government then clamped down on Manama by sending the tanks and other armored vehicles into the streets around the square, putting up barbed wire and establishing checkpoints to deter gatherings.

On Friday, army units shot at marchers streaming toward the square. More than 50 people were injured in the second consecutive day of clashes. Some of the protesters were wary of Bahrain's leaders, despite the military withdrawal. "Of course we don't trust them," said Ahmed al-Shaik, a 23-year-old civil servant. "They will probably attack more and more, but we have no fear now." The cries against the king and his inner circle - at a main Shiite mosque and at burials for those killed when security forces attacked a protest camp in Pearl Square - reflected a sharp escalation of the political uprising, which began with calls to weaken the Sunni monarchy's power and address claims of discrimination against the Shiite majority. The mood, however, has turned toward defiance of the entire ruling system after the crackdown, which put the nation under emergency-style footing with military forces in key areas and checkpoints on main roads.

Algerian police, meanwhile, thwarted a rally by thousands of pro-democracy supporters, breaking up the crowd into isolated groups to keep them from marching. Police brandishing clubs, but no firearms, weaved their way through the crowd in central Algiers, banging their shields, tackling some protesters and keeping traffic flowing through the planned march route. A demonstrating lawmaker was hospitalized after suffering a head wound when he fell after police kicked and hit him, colleagues said. The gathering, organized by the Coordination for Democratic Change in Algeria, comes a week after a similar protest, which organizers said brought an estimated 10,000 people and up to 26,000 riot police onto the streets of Algiers. Algeria has also been hit by numerous strikes over the past month.

President Abdelaziz Bouteflika has [as mentioned] promised to lift the state of emergency, which has been in place since early 1992 to combat a budding insurgency by islamist extremists. The insurgency, which continues sporadically, has killed an estimated 200,000 people. Bouteflika has warned, however, that a long-standing ban on protests in Algiers would remain in place, even once the state of emergency is lifted. Foreign Minister Mourad Medelci, on a visit to Madrid, said in a French radio interview earlier this week that the protesters were only a minority. "Algeria is not Tunisia. Algeria is not Egypt," he said in an interview with France's Europe 1 radio.

Algeria does have many of the ingredients for a popular revolt. It is riddled with corruption and has never successfully grappled with its soaring jobless rate among youth - estimated by some to be up to 42 percent - despite its oil and gas wealth. "The people are for change, but peacefully," said sociologist Nasser Djebbi. "We have paid a high price."

"Ad the embryo-revolution in Egypt. NRK reports that most of the international newsmedia have left Egypt. We call on these media to continue to report from Egypt, and thus contribute so the present embryo-revolution can be a real revolution soon!" The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section, declared in a joint statement, published by AIIS and a.o.t. distributed to all the main international newsmedia Saturday evening.

Egypt officially recognizes moderate islamic party, Associated Press reported: A moderate islamic party outlawed for 15 years was granted official recognition Saturday by an Egyptian court in a sign of increasing political openness after the fall of autocratic President Hosni Mubarak. Al-Wasat Al-Jadid, or the New Center, was founded in 1996 by activists who split off from the conservative [totalitarian, extremist and supporters of Hamas type sharia-rule] Muslim Brotherhood and sought to create a political movement promoting a tolerant version of islam with liberal tendencies. Its attempts to register as an official party were rejected four times since then, most recently in 2009. In 2007, Human Rights Watch accused Mubarak and his ruling National Democratic Party of using the law that governs the formation of political parties to maintain a virtual monopoly over political power in Egypt by denying opponents the right to form parties.

The founder of the newly recognized party, Abu al-Ila Madi, said Saturday's ruling by the Supreme Administrative Court was "a positive fruit of the Jan. 25 revolution of the freedom generation." Eighteen days of protests in the heart of Cairo and across the country forced the country's president of 29 years to step down. Madi said his party would immediately get to work organizing its membership and opening branches to freely participate in Egypt's political life. Mubarak's party had dominated Egyptian politics and the national parliament. The military rulers who took control of the country after his ouster dissolved the legislature - one of the protesters' key demands - as a step toward democratic reforms [read: revolution, as reforms just mean changes within the present autocratic system] and eventually returning the country to civilian control. November's parliamentary elections were widely criticized as fraudulent.

Several opposition parties had been authorized under Mubarak's rule, but their representation in parliament was small and they had little influence. Egypt's largest and most popular opposition movement, the Muslim Brotherhood, was also outlawed under Mubarak but ran candidates in parliamentary elections as independents. There is some concern in Washington and other world capitals that the Brotherhood, which calls for the formation of an islamic state in Egypt, could now dramatically increase its influence in Egyptian politics. [See the report of 16.02.2011.] Seeking to prove Al-Wasat Al-Jadid has a more moderate position, Madi said two Coptic Christians and three women were among the party's 24 top members. "We will cooperate with all political powers, secular or democratic, to develop the democratic process," Madi said.

Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie sought in a statement Saturday to calm fears about his movement's intentions in post-Mubarak Egypt, saying the Brotherhood is part of Egyptian society but does not seek to control it. He repeated that the group would not put up a candidate for the presidential election later this year. [That is a part of MB's very likely strategy to achieve a totalitarian islamic state in Egypt, see the report of 16.02.2011.] The group's members "are an inseparable part of the fabric of the nation and one of its essential components," he wrote. "They have no ambition for the presidency or a majority or any extra positions. This is not a new position today but a fixed position of the Muslim Brotherhood." Badie also addressed Egypt's military rulers, calling on them to assure workers that the economy will improve.

Workers calling for better wages have held labor strikes throughout the country, and the army has expressed impatience, saying it will no longer allow "illegal" demonstrations that stop production and will take action against them. Badie advised the army to "promise them that the situation will improve gradually with the improvement of the national economic situation." He also called on the army to "carry out productive dialogue" with representatives of different groups. "This will calm spirits and move people to work and production, and all will come together in an environment of trust and love" he said.

Libertarians repel the Egyptian military junta's talk that they "will no longer allow [so called] 'illegal' demonstrations that stop production", and call for continued industrial actions.

The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section, responding to the ruling right fascist military junta's talk that they "will no longer allow [so called] 'illegal' demonstrations that stop production and will take action against them", declared in a joint statement:

"We call for continued industrial actions in Egypt. The industrial actions against the economic plutarchy in Egypt are legitimate and not illegal. There is capacity for GDP/capita per day = 6 200/365 = 17 $ per day equal pay, up from 2 $ for the poor now, and less for the economical plutarchists/capitalists - NOW! The fight for a revolutionary change, i.e. a revolution -- in libertarian, real democratic direction -- and mainly compatible with anarchist policy, continues, but the non-progressive Ex-Mubarak military junta autocracy is still powerful. There are significant direct actions, i.e. strikes, sit-ins and rallies etc., against the top heavy Egyptian economic pyramid, i.e. economical plutarchy.

For more information about economical plutarchy/capitalism, i.e. top heavy income pyramid, economic hierarchy, and the fight against it in general and in Egypt, see the introduction at the AI's official links-site, Anarchy is optimal order - in the preamble to IAT-APT, System theory and economic-political map (search for plutarchy in this file) and the Resolutions of the World Economic Council (WEC) with links. Industrial actions, direct actions, against the economic plutarchy are going on in Egypt and increasing. The themes of democracy, justice and empowerment remain intact as the protest wave in Egypt increases and gets broader...

There is capacity/ability for GDP/capita per day = 6 200/365 = 17 $ per day PPP equal pay, up from 2 $ for the poor, and less for the economical plutarchists/capitalists - NOW! Thus there is capacity/ability for (17/2)100 %, i.e. 850 % pay hike for the poor up to equal pay, with 100% flat pay-distribution, i.e. about 100% horizontal economical organization, but then of course much less pay for the present top of the economic pyramid and hierarchy, the economical plutarchists/capitalists. Thus there is capacity/ability for significant realistic pay hikes, say, 100 % to 200 % perhaps more, for the poor - the bottom line workers, in general the people seen as a societal class - NOW!! And more pay hikes later!!!

The anarchists again warn the right fascist autocratic ruling generals, the military junta, about mutiny by the bottom line military and police if these fair demands are not met. As mentioned a development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, including industrial actions, and via organization, dialog and elections. GDP/capita = 6 200 $ is 2010 estimate US $ PPP, purchasing power parity, for Egypt, according to the CIA Factbook."

20.02.2011. Apropos religious parties and groups in Egypt and the other Arab countries, Iran and world wide, and life, esprit de corps, and death, today's speech by Anarchon is relevant. It is published in IJA online and distributed as a newsletter, quoting:

Sunday's speech by Anarchon - the real pope in Rome - 20.02.2011 - Spirituality defined and explained scientifically - For libertarian spirituality - Anarchist protest against the pope - And more.

Introduction about A. Spirituality defined and explained scientifically, and B. The catholic pope and similar vs Anarchon - the real pope in Rome

A. Spirituality defined and explained scientifically

The concept 'spirituality' is sometimes connected to religion, hierarchy, or so called supernatural forces and similar, but this is not the way most libertarians define it. By spirituality libertarians at large just mean, 'the state, quality, manner, or fact of being spiritual', including 'preoccupation with what concerns human inner nature (especially ethical or basic values and principles of systems, i.e. economic & political/administrative; for libertarians mainly anarchist principles and human ethics, etc.). Spiritual is defined as 'of, relating to, consisting of, or affecting the spirit'.

Spirit is defined in the following way: a) temper or disposition of mind or outlook especially when vigorous, as say, 'in high spirits'; b) the intelligent or sentient part of a persons mind; c) the activating or essential principle influencing a person, as say in 'acted in a spirit of helpfulness'; d)  the feeling, quality, or disposition characterizing something, as say, 'undertaken in a spirit of fun'; and e) the regard entertained by the members of a [libertarian] group for the honor and interests of the group as a whole, as say in 'spirit of the corps' (French: Esprit de corps).

The spirit is thus a part of the mind, located to the material brain, and not connected to an 'eternal soul', a non-material substance, or similar. Thus the spirit of a person is practically certain forever gone, when a person dies, with the present and near future technology. In a very distant future it will perhaps a) be possible to scan the brain and store a picture of it including the spirit, and also perhaps transfer it to a new, cloned body, and thus achieve b) an almost eternal life with mind, soul and spirit, within a pure materialist framework, but c) so far this is only science fiction. There may perhaps be god-like beings, with 'seven men's strength' and living almost eternally, etc, somewhere in the Universe, but they are practically certain not here on planet Gaia and have never been, and have practically certain no influence here.

The origin of religion is practically certain not divine, but is, a.o.t. according to modern brain-research and the psychology and psychiatry of religion, located to some parts of the brain. Like the ability to speak, the ability to religion, or more general spirituality, was developed genetically via the "missing links" from apeman to human, according to survival of the fittest, also including mutual aid. As for the parts in the brain developed for speech, which may be used for different languages (including Orwellian "1984" newspeak - and the opposite at www.anarchy.no), the parts for spirituality in the brain may be used for different religions as well as non-religious spirituality.

These parts of the brain may be especially activated during meditation, extreme stress, mental illness, epilepsy, by some drugs/narcotics or other artificial stimulation, say, strong magnetic fields, electric stimulation, etc. When activated it may give -- an of course false -- feeling of "something (which may be wrongly interpreted as extramental or supernatural) being near" and sometimes, more rare, (mainly religious) hallucinations of taste, smell, touch, sound and/or vision. This genetic primitive instinct towards religion, rooted back to apemen and "missing links", that modern men and women may have more or less, is today mainly useless, like the too strong instinct and taste for sugar.

And the spiritual instinct is sometimes directly harmful, say, related to jihad terrorism and charismatic rule with sectarianism and extremism in general. These parts of the brain, the instinct of ability towards spirituality, may however be used positively to develope a libertarian spirituality, mainly atheistic with a touch of agnosticism, humanistic, and an anarchist 'esprit de corps'.

B. The catholic pope and similar vs Anarchon - the real pope in Rome

(We have not quoted 5 points of criticism of the catholic pope, for more information see (click on:) For libertarian spirituality - Anarchist protest against the pope - IJA 1 (40) )

6. This resolution of the Anarchist International [IJA 1 (40)] also includes the libertarian comments of Anarchon, also known as 'the real pope in Rome', as opposed to the catholic beast-pope Benedict XVI. Anarchon is the elected spokesperson of AI in religious affairs, human ethics, spirituality and so on. Anarchon speaks for a) a movement toward heaven on earth, toward 100 percent anarchy and 0 percent authoritarian degree, and b) against hell on planet GAIA, i.e. economic-political systems with equal to or more than 666 per thousand authoritarian degree. That is why many call him 'the real pope in Rome'.

Anarchon is an atheist with a small dash of agnosticism, and promotes anarchist spirituality and human ethics, a scientific naturalistic point of view, as opposed to religion and similar, i.e. escapistic pseudo-sciences as astrology, reincarnation, supernaturalism, mysticism, so called 'miracles', kabbalah, anthroposophy (Rudolf Steiner) and new-age ideology in general. If you have questions or need advice in such matters, including the 'meaning of life', 'where do we come from', 'where do we go', 'life and death' and so on, feel free to contact Anarchon - Click here! For a libertarian spirituality!

The AIIS ( www.anarchy.no ) mainly avoids capital letters when writing about religion, as usual in the Nordic countries, except in names of organizations and as the first letter in a sentence. This is also a part of the 'Nordlish' brand of English of AIIS, a negation of Orwellian '1984' newspeak, and it is a part of a campaign to avoid negative effects of the primitive religious instinct, somewhat similar to a campaign for less sugar in the food we eat.

Say, AIIS usually writes 'islam', a name practically certain falsely assumed given by a so called allah (god) to this religion (quran 5:4). Islam is an Arabic word which literally means submission, obedience and peace = sometimes aggresive, violent jihad, i.e. holy war, remember Orwell's "1984" Big Brother newspeak: war = peace. Islam is derived from the Arabic root "salema" that means peace, purity, submission and obedience. Islam-followers are called muslims. Of course this 'submission' is made up by some cleric(s) manipulating on the spiritual instinct, and have no divine origin, as is the case with all religions, and anarchists are in general against total submission to authorities and for organization on equal footing, significant. AIIS also writes catholic, the word catholic (from Latin catholicus ) meaning "universal", and this is of course a lie that does not deserve a capital letter, because catholicism is not universal, but a special christian sect, etc., etc....

(The rest of For libertarian spirituality - Anarchist protest against the pope - IJA 1 (40) is matter of fact and strong criticism of the catholic pope, and comments and speeches of Anarchon in this connection.)

Meanwhile Sunday: BBC reports about a new spirit among the Arab people, calling for freedom and democracy. Egypt state media: Mubarak has no assets abroad (probably a lie). Dozens of former ministers, businessmen and senior leaders of Mubarak's ruling party are under investigation for alleged corruption. Egyptian tourism struggles to revive. Lots of industrial actions continue, but banks, which closed last week as their workers staged protests demanding better pay and an end to corruption, reopened for business on Sunday.

Egypt banks and pyramids open as some protest in Cairo, Reuters reported Sunday: ... There were some pockets of protest in Cairo. Attempting to placate pro-democracy reformers who want swift change, the military said at the weekend constitutional changes paving the way for elections in six months should be ready soon and the hated emergency law would be lifted before the polls. "A new constitution is a long-term goal. Let's first get the flaws out of the system to bring the process along," one expert on a key constitutional change committee said. "The say of the people is the most important factor in this process."

At pains to distance itself from Mubarak's old guard, the government plans to reshuffle the cabinet, probably on Monday. The new military rulers were also facing their first foreign policy test on Sunday with two Iranian naval vessels about to sail through the Suez Canal, causing grave concern in Israel. In a difficult decision, the military approved the Iranian ships' passage. Cairo is an ally of Washington, was the first Arab nation to sign a peace treaty with Israel and its relations with Iran have been strained for more than three decades.

Egyptians generally respect the 470,000-strong military, which played a key role in the downfall of Mubarak by not intervening, but some mistrust its intentions in reshaping a corrupt and oppressive system which it supported for decades. "I don't think the military is the best incubator of democracy anywhere," one Western diplomat said, adding: "You have to create an open political space now, so parties can be formed with freedom of association, assembly, peaceful activities, freedom of expression without interference from police sources. That should start right away."...

Any sign the army is reneging on its promises of democracy and civilian rule could reignite mass protests on the street and newly-empowered political voices are urging the army to proceed quickly with democracy and to free political prisoners. In another move to reach out to reformists, Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq said 222 political prisoners would soon be freed. The government said that 365 died in the bloodshed that accompanied the revolution, with about 5,000 people injured. Not everyone in the Egyptian capital heeded the army's warning that "the Supreme Council for the Armed forces will not allow the continuation of these illegal practices." About 70 employees were demonstrating in front of the head office of the Omar Effendi department store chain in central Cairo, demanding that the company be renationalized.

According to AFP, France24 and AIIS: Workers at Egypt's largest factory Misr Spinning and Weaving, ended a strike and went back to work on Sunday. Faisal Naousha, one of the main activists of the walkout, said the factory was running again after the strikers' main demands were met. "We ended the strike, the factory is working. Our demands were met," including a 25-percent increase in wages and the dismissal of a manager involved in corruption, Naousha said. Misr Spinning and Weaving is the largest plant in the Egyptian textile industry, which employs 48 percent of the nation's total workforce, according to the Centre for Trade Union and Workers' Services. Around 15,000 workers from the plant -- which employs 24,000 people in the Nile Delta city of Al-Mahalla al-Kubra, 100 kilometres (60 miles) north of Cairo -- went on strike last week. Both the public and private sectors, all over the country, have seen lots of industrial action since longtime president Hosni Mubarak stood down on February 11.

ElBaradei warns against early Egypt election. All the gains of Egypt's revolution will be lost if elections are held too soon because supporters of ousted president Hosni Mubarak will get back in power, opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei warned on Sunday. "If we go too fast, if we organize elections in four or five months, it will be all over for the revolution, the old regime will perpetuate itself in another guise," the Nobel Peace Prize laureate told the Turkish daily Milliyet. "Mubarak's party will make a comeback under a new banner. These people already have everything, money, the media.... Move too fast towards elections will mean allowing the old regime to get back into power with a new face," he said. ElBaradei envisaged the creation of a presidential council, also mentioned by the libertarians, composed of two civilians and one military member to manage a transition phase, which would include: 1. forming a constituent assembly, 2. a referendum on a new constitution and 3. the strengthening of political parties before elections. He said polls should not be held until at least a year from now. IIFOR commented to AIIS: "One year to elections may be a dangerous postponing, due to other contra-revolutionary factors... The opposition and the people in general should speed up at point 3. at once!"

In other Arab countries, Iran and USA Sunday: Tunisia: Several thousand protesters swarm the governmental palace to demand the ouster of the provisional government. Thousands march in Morocco to seek reform. Yemen's president offers to oversee a dialogue between the ruling party and the opposition, in a bid to diffuse 11 days of protests across the country calling for his ouster. Opposition groups refuse all dialogue with President Ali Abdullah Saleh, a key US ally, as long as security forces suppress demonstrations.

Jordan's King Abdullah II calls for "quick and real" reforms to give the public a greater role in governing and to eliminate corruption following anti-government protests over the last seven weeks. Activists are demanding a stronger role in politics and greater political freedoms. Kuwait: Descendants of desert nomads demonstrate for a third day to demand Kuwaiti citizenship and its lavish benefits. The stateless Arabs hold no citizenship but have been settled in the oil-rich Gulf nation for generations. Security forces fired tear gas to disperse them on Saturday. Kuwait's parliament speaker appeals for an end to the protests.

Gunmen torch Iraqi TV station that showed protest. Gulf shares drop on Mideast unrest. Bahrain opposition plots strategy before talks. Israeli PM: Iran exploiting regional instability, Iran briefly detains daughter of former president. Turkey plays growing political role in Middle East. Libyan forces fire on mourners at funeral again - AP estimates the death toll to at least 204 since Wednesday. US condemns crackdowns on Mideast protests.

21.02.2011. Egypt's activists skeptical about army intentions. The popular revolt in Libya: "We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!" - ITUC-resolutions - And more.

Egypt's activists skeptical about army intentions, Associated Press reported: Some of the young activists who launched the Egyptian uprising that toppled President Hosni Mubarak say they are skeptical about the military's pledges to hand over power to a democratically elected government [i.e. central administration, hopefully not x-archy, where x can be anything but not 'an']. They also warned Western diplomats in Cairo Monday that the remnants of Mubarak's regime that still hold positions of power could overturn the uprising's gains. The seven activists - representatives of a broad coalition of youth groups - also called on the international community to support Egypt's transition toward democracy, and asked for help in tracking down Mubarak's assets - rumored to be in the billions of dollars. The activists spoke as senior US and European officials, including British Prime minister David Cameron, were to arrive in Cairo for talks with the country's military leaders.

Later AP reported: Egypt's activists ask West to guarantee reform. In a meeting with Western diplomats in Cairo, the activists appealed to the US and Europe to change their policies toward governments in the Middle East. Many activists in the 18-days of mass protests that toppled Mubarak on Feb. 11 complain that Western governments have long supported dictators who back their interests at the expense of local democracy. "It is time that United States and Europe to revise and correct their policies in the region," said Bahey al-Din Hussein, director of the human rights institute that hosted the meeting. "This has always been our message, and we hope it won't fall on a deaf ears."

The seven activists, representatives of a broad coalition of youth groups, warned the diplomats that remnants of Mubarak's regime that still hold power could overturn the uprising's accomplishments. While the Egyptian army seized power when Mubarak stepped down, it has allowed a cabinet he appointed to remain in place as a caretaker government until elections can be held. The activists also asked for help in tracking down assets belonging to Mubarak and his associates that were acquired illegally - rumored to be in the billions of dollars. "When Egypt gets back that money, it won't need the foreign aid, and you will be relieved of that burden," said Islam Lutfi, who represent the Muslim Brotherhood on the activist coalition.

The meeting took place as senior US and European officials arrived in Egypt to meet with the country's military leaders. US Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs William Burns arrived Monday for three-day visit. And British Prime Minister David Cameron came to meet Egypt's Defense Minister Hussein Tantawi, Prime Minister Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq and members of the country's opposition groups. He told reporters on the plane to Cairo that he would to "talk to those currently running Egypt to make sure this really is a genuine transition from military rule to civilian rule." He lauded what he considered the secular, democratic goals of the protesters.

"This is not an islamist revolt, this is not extremists on the streets. This is people who want to have the sort of basic freedoms that we take for granted in the UK," he said. Cameron said he would not meet with representatives of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's [probably] largest and best organized opposition group, which was banned but tolerated under Mubarak. Cameron will not visit Libya or Bahrain - whose government's have both violently repressed recent protests calling for democratic reform [i.e. revolution, as reform is just changes within the present system] - on his four-day Middle East tour. But addressing recent anti-government protests around the region, Cameron called on Middle Eastern governments to respond with "reform not repression."

Recent anti-government demonstrations have led to the ouster of presidents in Tunisia and Egypt, while governments have violently tried to suppress similar protests in other countries including Yemen, Bahrain and Libya. Libya's response has been particularly brutal, with human rights groups and Libyan medical sources reporting more than 200 people killed by security forces in seven days of protests. Cameron called Libya's treatment of protesters "completely appalling and unacceptable."

ITUC Urges Gaddafi to End Massacre of Civilians in Libya. Horrified by the ferocity of the repression seen over the last five days in Libya, where at least 300 protestors have been killed and the number of injured has reached startling proportions, the ITUC has called on its affiliated organisations to mobilise without delay to urge their governments to put pressure on the 42-year old tyranny of Colonel Gaddafi and ensure an immediate end to the atrocities. "The unprecedented violence with which the authorities have responded to demonstrations by civilians legitimately demanding respect for their fundamental rights, freedom of expression and assembly, is dragging the country into a dreadful bloodbath," said ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow.

"Colonel Gaddafi must bring this ferocious repression to an immediate halt; the ITUC is pressing the international community to take urgent action in this direction. These massacres must not go unpunished," she added. As workers at the Nafoora oilfield down tools this morning in solidarity with the protestors and solidarity demonstrations are held in Cairo and Tunisia, the ITUC expresses its total solidarity with the civilian populations in Libya, firmly condemning the violence being used against them. Having received reports on the arrival at the Ras-Jdir border post of hundreds of Tunisian workers fleeing the violence in Libya, the ITUC also called for the protection of the many migrant workers in the country. The ITUC represents 176 million workers in 151 countries and territories and has 301 national affiliates.

The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, mainly agree to the trade union international ITUC's resolution above, but are adding: "We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!" Also EU ministers urge Libya to end attacks on protests, according to AP... Later on Monday ITUC sent the following resolution to the AI and IWW secretariate:

Middle East/Maghreb: "End the repression. Social and political responses are needed!" insists ITUC. Triggered by the Tunisian revolution, then given impetus by that of Egypt, the wave of protests spreading throughout the Middle East and the Maghreb is growing by the day. The response to it has become increasingly violent, culminating in recent days with the atrocious massacres committed in Libya by the brutal dictatorship of Colonel Gaddafi, regarding which the ITUC has just launched an urgent appeal [see the ITUC-resolution above].

"Unemployment, poverty, inequalities, corruption, the repression of fundamental human rights... over and above the features specific to each country, the causes of the revolt are the same everywhere, and lie at the root of the vast and brave mobilisation of so many young people deprived of a future and freedoms. At this truly historic moment, the international trade union movement expresses its support for the legitimate aspirations of the region's people for greater democracy and social justice. Those in power must stop responding with repression and listen, once and for all, to their peoples' demands," said ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow.

In Libya alone, hundreds of civilians have been savagely massacred in less than a week. Following the terrible loss of lives in Tunisia and Egypt, repression has also claimed all too many victims in Bahrain, Djibouti, Iraq, the autonomous Kurdistan region, and Yemen. Demonstrations have also been suppressed in Algeria. The ITUC is calling on the international community to ensure that those responsible for these repressive criminal acts are brought to justice.

As revolt also brews in Mauritania, national trade union centres affiliated to the ITUC (CGTM, CLTM, CNTM) held demonstrations last week to press for the opening of a social dialogue to tackle the "explosive situation in the country". On 17 February, Sharan Burrow sent a message to the G20 stressing the urgent need to respond to the problems of unemployment and inequalities that are driving the wave of protest, by implementing global policies supporting growth in employment and incomes. "Jobs and rights, that is what young people in the Arab world are rightly demanding," said Sharan Burrow.

From the very outset, the ITUC, together with its Tunisian affiliate the UGTT, which played a key role in the overthrow of Ben Ali's dictatorial regime, expressed its full support for the thousands of trade unionists involved in the vast movement for change. "The ITUC, which strengthened its presence in the Arab region at its last Congress in Vancouver in June, is continuing to work closely with the UGTT to meet the future challenges in Tunisia. As two million Egyptians demonstrated their determination, on Friday, to secure a regime change, the ITUC is also continuing to support the new independent trade union movement, a key player in the transition underway. Likewise, in Bahrain, we are standing by our affiliate (GFBTU), which we have joined in condemning the repression and calling for national dialogue," said Sharan Burrow.

"The days ahead are extremely critical. The international community must take action commensurate with the magnitude of the challenges raised by these popular movements, to ensure an end to repression, and the emergence of political, social and economic solutions including employment and social protection as well as bringing the long-awaited freedoms and development to everyone in the region. The building of free and independent trade unionism in the region is essential to the construction of a better future. Trade union freedoms and social dialogue go hand in hand with democracy and development."

As journalists are killed, injured and prevented on a massive scale from performing their key task of informing the public, the ITUC also calls for respect for freedom of the press and the exercise of that right. Responding to the sentencing of a 15-year-old Syrian blogger to five years in prison, the ITUC is calling for an immediate end to obstacles to the use of Internet and other means of communication imposed by all too many rulers in the region. In Kuwait, hundreds of migrant workers from a range of countries have been demonstrating over recent days for equal civil rights. In Libya, thousands of migrant workers are trying to flee the violence. The ITUC recalls that the fight for human and trade union rights in the region goes hand in hand with the global fight for migrant workers' rights, especially in the Persian Gulf, where they represent a huge share of the labour force facing widespread exploitation and discrimination.

In modern usage the Maghreb comprises the political units of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Mauritania. The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, mainly agree to the trade union international ITUC's resolution above, but are repeating: "We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!"

In Libya protests have spread from the eastern region and the cities Benghazi and Bayda to the capital, Tripoli and more... One of Colonel Gaddafi's sons, Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, falsely declared the protests are being stirred up by people outside Libya. In a long address on Libyan TV (also published by BBC), which the libertarian think-tank IIFOR described as "rambling" to AIIS, Gaddafi said the deaths reported from anti-government protests were "imaginary". He also warned people not to get "carried away" - saying his father's supporters would fight "to the last bullet."

But IIFOR and many others say the regime's days probably are very much numbered. Syed Wasif, Professor of International Law in Washington says Colonel Gaddafi has lost all legitimacy - and some of his military support. Speaking to PressTV, Professor Wasif said Colonel Gaddafi has lost the support of part of the military - and has to go; echoing the call from The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections for "Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!" i.e. if not today, within a few days or weeks.

In the evening CNN sends the following short note to the AI/IFA and IWW secretariate: "Situation in Libya appears to worsen with reports that helicopters fired on protesters. CNN working to confirm." This may be difficult, as communications to the capital appeared to have been cut, and residents could not be reached by phone from outside the country, according to AP. State TV quoted Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam [a.k.a. Saif al-Islam Gaddafi], as saying the military conducted airstrikes on remote areas, away from residential neighborhoods, on munitions warehouses, denying reports that warplanes attacked Tripoli and Benghazi. Jordanians who fled Libya gave horrific accounts of a "bloodbath" in Tripoli, saying they saw people shot, scores of burned cars and shops, and what appeared to be armed mercenaries who looked as if they were from other African countries.

Libya at night: Deep cracks opened in Moammar Gadhafi's [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] regime Monday, with Libyan government officials at home and abroad resigning, air force pilots defecting and a major government building ablaze after clashes in the capital of Tripoli. Gadhafi appeared to have lost the support of at least one major tribe, several military units and some of his own diplomats, including the delegation to the United Nations. Deputy UN Ambassador Ibrahim Dabbashi accused Gadhafi of committing genocide against his own people in the current crisis. One resident who lived near Green Square in the capital described a "very, very violent" situation. "We know that the regime is reaching its end and Libyans are not retreating," the resident said. "People have a strange determination after all that happened." Protesters called for another night of defiance against the Arab world's longest-serving leader despite a crackdown, according to AP.

22.02.2011. Social-individualist anarchist tendency in the Egyptian revolt. The anarchist black flag with a white fist, a symbol of peaceful non-ochlarchical libertarian resistance is carried by many protesters. The situation in Libya.

The anarchist black flag with a white fist, a symbol of peaceful and non-ochlarchical libertarian resistance, was carried by many through the streets of Cairo a.o.t. during the symbolic revolution that ousted president Hosni Mubarak. This is a symbol used by peaceful non-ochlarchical anarchists in different mixes at least since the 1970s. Black stands for anarchism, the fist for resistance or protest, and white for peace and the non-ochlarchical. This time it was probably imported via the Canvas (Center for Applied Nonviolent Action and Strategies, Serbia and international), rooted back to Otpor (Resistance), that some paranoid marxist leftists think is run by the CIA. It is however likely that organizations and individuals in USA, also some with links to CIA, may have given some money to Canvas, as many others world wide have. Canvas in general exaggerates its influence.

But Canvas' program and ideas stand on its own feet, i.e. a somewhat Tolstoy-inspired but secular, non-violent, form of social-individualist anarchism and resistance. Canvas' strategy and Tolstoy-inspired strategies in general have however its limitations, and may be manipulated in contra-revolutionary direction. But it is useful as a part of a more general strategy: As mentioned a development towards real democracy in Egypt must be done by the people's actions, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, including industrial actions, and via organization, dialog and elections. The main strategy of The Anarchist International - AI/IFA is basically neither pacifism nor terrorism, and for as little as possible violence. The limitations of a pacifist strategy are clear in Libya, and the policy in Egypt was not 100% pacifist. For more information about the main anarchist strategy, see Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) and The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31).

Anyway Canvas' influence in Egypt was and is limited, although in 2009, in Belgrade, Canvas gave Egyptian youthgroup April 6 lessons in peaceful protest. The Egyptians however did not adopt some of Otpor's more whimsical tactics. The influence of The Anarchist International - AI/IFA, and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section, is most likely more important in this connection. A somewhat anarchist, and mainly social-individualist anarchist tendency, with an Egyptian local touch, was and is significant in the still mostly informal people's movement in the country. The anarchist black flag with a white fist, a symbol of peacful non-ochlarchical libertarian resistance is carried by many protesters in Egypt.

Social-individualism, a libertarian tendency, is a centrist and progressive moderate form of anarchism, also called the third alternative, located between advanced social-democratic marxism and advanced social-liberalism on the economic-political map. Many social-individualists don't label themselves as anarchists for different reasons, but they are practically certain all de facto mainly moderate libertarians, i.e. for freedom and real democracy.


The anarchist black flag with a white fist, a symbol of peaceful non-ochlarchical libertarian resistance is carried by many during protests in Egypt.

By the way, the ultra-authoritarian, totalitarian, Muslim Brotherhood is sometimes sailing unders false anarchist black flag, documented by BBC 04.02.2011, and the International Anarchist Tribunal - IAT-APT handed out a Brown Card to the islamist movement for this serious break of the Oslo Convention.

Social-individualism, i.e. moderate libertarianism, including freedom and real democracy, is today an important tendency, especially regarding the middle to long term aim, also in Tunisia and in many other oppositions in North Africa and the Middle East. The earlier dominant islamist oppositions are less important today because the oppositions are broader people's movements, but islamism represents a contra-revolutionary strategic danger.

New interim cabinet, still mostly made up of the old guard Mubarak-gang. Key portfolios of defense interior, foreign, finance and justice were unchanged in a cabinet reshuffle, state television confirmed on Tuesday when it broadcast the swearing in ceremony for the new ministers. The list of new ministers included changing the veteran oil minister, as well as introducing politicians who had formally been opposed to the rule of Hosni Mubarak, who stepped down from office on February 11. Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, a.k.a. 'Mubarak's Poodle', who leads the ruling military council and has been defense minister for about 20 years, took the new ministers' oaths of office.

The latest reshuffle brought into the cabinet a few so called opposition figures including Yehia el-Gamal, deputy prime minister, the Wafd party's Mounir Abdel Nour as tourism minister and Tagammu party's Gowdat Abdel-Khaleq as minister of social solidarity and social justice. Both Wafd and Tagammu had often been close to Mubarak's government.

The Center for Trade Unions and Workers Services (CTUWS) said the government's appointment of Ismail Ibrahim Fahmy as new labor minister showed it continued to "co-opt formal labor unions and the labor ministry," it said in a statement. Fahmy was the treasurer of the so called general union for workers syndicates, one of the Mubarak-regime's organizations, in Egypt. "We warn of the dire consequences of defying the will of the workers and their legitimate right to enjoy union rights," CTUWS said.

The ultra-authoritarian, totalitarian, islamist Muslim Brotherhood, strongly related to Hamas, and perhaps the country's biggest opposition group, said the new cabinet showed that Mubarak's "cronies" still controlled the country's politics. "This new cabinet is an illusion," Brotherhood senior member Essam el-Erian said. "It pretends it includes real opposition but in reality this new government puts Egypt under the tutelage of the West," he added. "The main defense, justice, interior and foreign ministries remain unchanged, signaling Egypt's politics remain in the hands of Mubarak and his cronies," Erian said.

Both the Brotherhood and secular youth protesters had demanded that all Mubarak's ministers must be changed in the new government sworn in ahead of parliamentary and presidential elections. Egyptian online democracy activists called for demonstrations to demand the removal of the country's interim government, saying it contains too many old faces. "The call for the million-man march on Friday would show people's anger and frustration," Erian said.

Libya: Gadhafi vows to die a martyr, calls on supporters to fight protesters in the street, Asscoiated Press reported: Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi vowed to fight on to his "last drop of blood" and roared at his supporters to take to the streets against protesters in a furious, fist-pounding speech Tuesday after two nights of bloodshed in the capital as his forces tried to crush the uprising that has fragmented his regime. Gadhafi's call portended a new round of mayhem in the capital of 2 million people. The night before, residents described a rampage by pro-regime militiamen, who shot on sight anyone found in the streets and opened fire from speeding vehicles at people watching from windows of their homes. Tuesday morning, bodies still lay strewn in some streets. Gunshots in celebration were heard after Gadhafi's speech, aired on state TV and on a screen to several hundred supporters in Tripoli's central Green Square, witnesses said.

Swathed in brown robes and a turban, the country's leader for nearly 42 years spoke from behind a podium in the entrance of his bombed-out Tripoli residence hit by US airstrikes in the 1980s and left unrepaired as a symbol of defiance. At times the camera panned back to show the outside of the building and its towering monument of a gold-colored fist crushing an American fighter jet. But the view also gave a surreal image of Gadhafi, shouting and waving his arms wildly all alone in a broken-down lobby with no audience, surrounded by torn tiles dangling from the ceiling, shattered concrete pillars and bare plumbing pipes. "Libya wants glory, Libya wants to be at the pinnacle, at the pinnacle of the world," he proclaimed, pounding his fist on the podium. "I am a fighter, a revolutionary from tents ... I will die as a martyr at the end," he said, vowing to fight "to my last drop of blood."

Gadhafi [falsely] depicted the protesters as misguided youths, who had been given drugs and money by a "small, sick group" to attack police and government buildings. He said the uprising was fomented by "bearded men" - a reference to islamic fundamentalists - and Libyans living abroad. He called on supporters to take to the streets to attack protesters. "You men and women who love Gadhafi ... get out of your homes and fill the streets," he said. "Leave your homes and attack them in their lairs." "The police cordons will be lifted, go out and fight them," he said, urging youth to form local committees across the country "for the defense of the revolution and the defense of Gadhafi." "Forward, forward, forward!" he barked at the speech's conclusion, pumping both fists in the air as he stormed away from the podium. He was kissed by about a dozen supporters, some in security force uniforms. Then he climbed into a golf cart-like vehicle and puttered away.

The turmoil in the capital escalates a week of protests and bloody clashes in Libya's eastern cities that have shattered Gadhafi's grip on the nation. Many cities in the east appeared to be under the control of protesters after units of Gadhafi's army defected. Protesters in the east claimed to hold several oil fields and facilities and said they were protecting them against damage or vandalism. The regime has been hit by a string of defections by ambassadors abroad, including its UN delegation, and a few officials at home. In response, Gadhafi's security forces have unleashed the bloodiest crackdown of any Arab country against the wave of protests sweeping the region, which toppled leaders of Egypt and Tunisia. At least 62 people were killed in violence in Tripoli since Sunday, according to the New York-based Human Rights Watch, but it cautioned that that figure came from only two hospitals. That comes on top of at least 233 people killed across the so far in the uprising, counted by the group from hospitals around the country.

The head of the UN human rights agency, Navi Pillay, called for an investigation, saying widespread and systematic attacks against civilians "may amount to crimes against humanity." The UN Security Council was holding an emergency session Tuesday, and Western diplomats were pushing for it to demand an end to the retaliation against protesters. Libya's deputy UN ambassador Ibrahim Dabbashi called Monday for the world body to enforce a no-fly zone over cities to prevent mercenaries and military equipment from reaching the regime. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said it was up to the council whether to discuss the proposal.

The first major protests to hit an OPEC country - and major supplier to Europe - sent oil prices soaring to more than $93 a barrel Tuesday. A string of international oil companies have begun evacuating their expatriate workers or their families, and the Spanish oil company Repsol-YPF said it suspended production in Libya on Tuesday. It accounted for about 3.8 percent of Libya's total production of 1.6 million barrels a day. World leaders also have expressed outrage. US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called on Gadhafi to "stop this unacceptable bloodshed" and said the world was watching the events "with alarm."

Tripoli streets were largely empty during the day Tuesday, except for people venturing out for food, wary of militia attacks. One man in his 50s said residents of his neighborhood were piling up roadblocks of concrete, bricks and wood to try to slow militiamen. He said he had seen several streets with funeral tents mourning the dead. He described spending the night before barricaded in his home, blankets over the windows, as militiamen rampaged in the streets until dawn. Buses unloaded militia fighters - Libyans and foreigners - in several neighborhoods. Others sped in vehicles with guns mounted on the top, opening fire, including at people watching from windows, he said. "I know of two different families, one family had a 4-year-old who was shot and killed on a balcony in the eastern part of the city, and another lady on the balcony was shot in the head," he said. He, like other residents, contacted by the Associated Press, spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.

One of the heaviest battlegrounds was the impoverished, densely populated district of Fashloum. There, militiamen shot any "moving human being" with live ammunition, including ambulances, so wounded were left in the streets to die, one resident said. He said that as he fled the neighborhood Monday night, he ran across a group of militiamen, including foreign fighters. "The Libyans (among them) warned me to leave and showed me bodies of the dead and told me: `We were given orders to shoot anybody who moves in the place,'" said the resident. Militias - which many witnesses say include foreign fighters who appear to be from sub-Saharan Africa - have taken the forefront in the crackdown in Tripoli. That is in part because Gadhafi has traditionally kept his military and other armed forces weakened to prevent any challenge.

The week of upheaval in Libya has weakened - if not broken for now - the control of Gadhafi's regime in parts of the east. Protesters claim to control a string of cities across just under half of Libya's 1,600-kilometer-long (1,000 mile) Mediterranean coast, from the Egyptian border in the east to the city of Ajdabiya, an important site in the oil fields of central Libya, said Tawfiq al-Shahbi, a protest organizer in the eastern city of Tobruk. He said had visited the crossing station into Egypt and that border guards had fled. In Tobruk and Benghazi, the country's second largest city, protesters were raising the pre-Gadhafi flag of Libya's monarchy on public buildings, he and other protesters said. Protesters and local tribesmen were protecting several oil fields and facilities around Ajdabiya, said Ahmed al-Zawi, a resident there. They had also organized watch groups to guard streets and entrances to the city, he said.

Residents are also guarding one of Libya's main oil export ports, Zuweita, and the pipelines feeding into it, he said. The pipelines are off and several tankers in the part left empty, said al-Zawi, who said he visited Zuweita on Tuesday morning. In Benghazi, protesters over the weekend overran police stations and security headquarters, taking control of the streets with the help of army units that broke away and sided with them. Benghazi residents, however, remained in fear of a regime backlash. One doctor in the city said Tuesday many spent the night outside their homes, hearing rumors that airstrikes and artillery assaults were imminent. "We know that although we are in control of the city, Gadhafi loyalists are still here hiding and they can do anything anytime," he said.

Gadhafi, the longest serving Arab leader, appeared briefly on TV early Tuesday to dispel rumors that he had fled. Sitting in a car in front of what appeared to be his residence and holding an umbrella out of the passenger side door, he told an interviewer that he had wanted to go to the capital's Green Square to talk to his supporters gathered there, but the rain stopped him. "I am here to show that I am in Tripoli and not in Venezuela. Don't believe those misleading dog stations," Gadhafi said, referring to the media reports that he had left the country. The video clip and comments lasted less than a minute. But Tuesday evening's speech lasted well over a half hour. During it, Gadhafi recounting his days as a young revolutionary leader who "liberated" Libya - a reference to the 1969 military coup that brought him to power - and his defiance against US airstrikes.

He insisted that since he has no official title, he cannot resign - Gadhafi is referred to as the "brother leader," but is not president. He [falsely] said he had not ordered police to use any force force used against protesters [i.e. the people] - that his supporters had come out voluntarily to defend him. "I haven't ordered a single bullet fired," he [falsely] said, warning that if he does, "everything will burn." He said that if protests didn't end, he would stage a "holy march" with millions of supporters to cleanse Libya. He demanded protesters in Benghazi hand over weapons taken from captured police stations and military bases, warning of separatism and civil war. "No one allows his country to be a joke or let a mad man separate a part of it," he declared.

Later Tuesday the UN Security Council condemned the use of violence in Libya and called for those responsible for attacks on civilians to be held to account. The call came in a statement agreed by the 15-nation council after a day of debate on the clashes in the North African country.

The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared: "We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days or weeks!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!!"

23.02.2011. The concepts of revolution and reform defined and analyzed - News and comments about Egypt & Tunisia and the other Arab countries Wednesday:

The concepts of revolution and reform defined and analyzed - At the moment there are ongoing revolts plus embryo-revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, but still no delivery and birth of real revolutions. In other Arab countries there are only revolts. IIFOR reports to AIIS:

If the system works significantly more from the bottom, grassroots - the people, and upwards, than from the top downwards, to the bottom, it is anarchism and anarchy. The grassroots - the people - is here defined as a class as opposed to the superiors economical and/or political/administrative, i.e. in income/remuneration and/or political/administrative rank. Anarchy and anarchism may happen just 1. a brief moment - a glimpse of anarchy, 2. in the short term, 3. medium term and 4. in the long term.

The fundamental parameters of a system, the coordinates on the economic-political map, are usually estimated as average, say, as moving averages, rather long term structural estimates, including the libertarian degree (= 100% - the authoritarian degree). Around the long term average structural estimates, there may be medium or short term dips or the opposite, a hike, without changing the fundamental rather long term average parameters.

Just a brief moment - a glimpse of anarchy, will in itself not change the long term structural average coordinates. There may however of course also be shift in the rather long term average structural estimates. A significant change of a system's coordinates on the economic-political map and in reality, is per definition a revolution or a revolutionary change, i.e. a real revolution. Nothing else is a societal, i.e. economic and/or political/administrative, real revolution, i.e. with substance, in short revolution. A revolution may be short lived or a lasting change of a system's coordinates on the economic-political map.

State/archy, seen as a societal concept, may be a form of marxism, populism/fascism or liberalism, see the economic-political map, click on: System theory, with the four main quadrants and the 16 sectors for different subsystems. Capitalism is economical plutarchy. A revolution may be in libertarian direction, in direction towards anarchy, but still the system may be a form of marxism, populism/fascism or liberalism. Via a series of revolutions in libertarian direction, the system may reach the anarchist quadrant of the economic-political map. This may take years, a long time, see System theory - Chapter V. B.! Revolutions increasing the authoritarian degree or the distance of a system vis-a-vis the anarchist quadrant of the map, are contra-revolutions.

Reform is per definition changes within a given system, i.e. without a significant change of a system's coordinates on the economic-political map and in reality, and this means status quo and/or at best insignificant change of a system's coordinates. Usually a waste of time and fooling the people. However a series of incremental reforms, each with insignificant change of a system's coordinates, may add up to a revolutionary change over time, a significant change of a system's coordinates on the economic-political map and in reality, and thus in reality be a revolution. But this is not reform, but revolution, revolutionary policy, revolution in reforms' disguise.

In addition to 1. real revolution, in short revolution, 2. revolution as a glimpse, i.e. a symbolic revolution, and 3. embryo-revolution, that may result in a) an aborted revolution or b) delivery and birth of a real revolution, are relevant concepts. Point 2 and 3 and 3.a) are pseudo-revolutions, not real revolutions. Ad 2. and 3. (except a) and b)) the term half-revolution may perhaps be relevant. To explain this further we may look on the following examples.

When the dictators left, the Tunisians and Egyptians experienced a glimpse of real democracy i.e. anarchy and anarchism. But the dictators were replaced with autocratic interim governments mainly from the 'old guard' and there are no significant changes in these systems' coordinates on the economic-political map so far, and thus so far no real revolutions have happened.

After the revolutionary glimpses, a glimpse of anarchy, i.e. symbolic revolutions, the systems in Tunisia and Egypt have had -- and still have -- embryo-revolutions. The Tunisian Jasmine revolution and the Egypthian Tahrir Square revolution are still ongoing, but they are only embryo-revolutions, not real revolutions, in short revolution. The present situation of continued revolt in Tunisia respectively Egypt is just embryo-revolution, it may result in a) an abortion, an aborted revolution, or b) a real revolution, i.e. with substance -- a significant change of a system's coordinates -- in short revolution. Delivery and birth of a real revolution, hopefully in libertarian direction, may still take some time, perhaps long time. And then there is the fight for keeping the revolution alive, and develope further.

In other Arab countries there are only revolts so far, no revolutions of any kind, but there may be some later.

Ad Tunisia respectively Egypt: The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared: "The present situation of continued revolt is just an embryo-revolution, it may result in a) an abortion, an aborted revolution, or b) a real revolution, i.e. with substance. The revolution may in a way be seen as ongoing, but it is just an embryo-revolution - and no real revolution yet.

We call for an end of the present totalitarian right fascist regime, and a steady and orderly movement of the system towards real democracy, i.e. anarchy - a real revolution and continued increased libertarian degree, see System theory - Chapter V. B.! A development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, including industrial actions, and via organization, dialog and elections!"

Also in Egypt: Egyptian authorities impose a travel ban on former Prime Minister Atef Obeid and long-serving Culture Minister Farouq Hosni. The restrictions also cover the head of state TV and radio, as well as nine businessmen. Such measures are normally a prelude to a criminal investigation and possible trial.

Libya Wednesday. New videos posted by Libya's opposition show anti-government protesters raising the pre-Moammar Gaddafi flag on a building outside Tripoli and lining up cement blocks to defend themselves on a square inside the capital. The videos were posted on Facebook Wednesday, a day after Gaddafi as mentioned vowed to fight to his "last drop of blood" in a televised speech that signaled an escalation of a bloody crackdown on dissent by his supporters. The footage couldn't be independently confirmed.

The violence which has accompanied Libya's bloody revolt against the totalitarian fascist Gaddafi regime regime has left 300 dead, including over 100 soldiers, according to the Libyan authorities. But as families buried their dead at a cemetery in Tripoli, residents believing their own eyes put the toll far higher. Human Rights Watch and opposition groups say more than twice that number have died. Italy's Foreign Minister Franco Frattini told lawmakers it's "likely" more than 1,000 people have been killed in the violence, according to Italian media reports citing witnesses and hospital sources.

In towns where Gaddafi's grip has been challenged, locals have been tearing down symbols of the regime. But overnight, in the town of Sabratah, large numbers of the Libyan army are said to have been deployed following the destruction of government buildings. In the east of the country, earlier fierce battles that accounted for many of the dead were caught on mobile phone cameras. But now Benghazi and Tobruk are reported calm and under the control of the protesters while Libya's interior minister became the latest senior official to defect.

Anti-Gaddafi rebels are in control of the eastern city of Tobruk. Soldiers said they no longer backed the Libyan leader and that the eastern region was out of his control. They have been operating checkpoints and denouncing Gaddafi. One general said he decided to switch sides after hearing the authorities had given orders to fire on civilians. Tobruk lies close to the Egyptian border. Thousands have been fleeing across the frontier to make it home to Egypt and escape the violence. In eastern Libya the military are now said to be mobilizing to defend people against possible attack from Gaddafi's forces. Accounts say his supporters have been shooting people and a munitions store in Tobruk was bombed. However in Tripoli many Gaddafi supporters are in the streets, shouting euphorically "Gaddafi, Gaddafi", waving his green flags.

The scope of the totalitarian fascist Colonel Gaddafi's rule in Libya was whittled away Wednesday as major cities and towns closer to the capital fell into the hands of protesters demanding his ouster. In Libya's east, now all but broken away, the opposition vowed to liberate Tripoli, where the Libyan ruler is holed up with a force of militiamen roaming the streets. In a further sign of Gaddafi's faltering hold, two air force pilots - one from the leader's own tribe - parachuted out of their warplane and let it crash into the deserts of eastern Libya, rather than follow orders to bomb a opposition-held city. In Tripoli, Gaddafi's stronghold, protest organizers were calling for new rallies Thursday and Friday, raising the potential for a new bloody confrontation. However in many neighborhoods, residents set up watch groups to keep militiamen out, barricading their streets with concrete blocks, metal and rocks and searching those trying to enter, said a Tripoli activist.

International momentum was building for action to punish Gaddafi's regime for the bloody crackdown it has unleashed against the week-old uprising against his rule. At midnight CNN reports: US sending officials to Europe to coordinate effort to stop "outrageous" violence in Libya, President Obama says.

The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, repeated: "We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days or weeks!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!!"

Bahrain. In contrast to Libya, yesterday the centre of the Bahraini capital Manama was filled with thousands of demonstrators calling for the government's downfall – and to remember the victims of the past week's violence. Many majority Shi'ite Muslims claim they are the victims of long-term discrimination by the ruling Sunni elite. Joining the protest was a group of army and police officers, conscious that the military firing on protesters had contributed to the death toll of seven. "We decided that our job is to protect people and not to beat them up," said policeman Abu Noah. "The weapons that have been used against the people are weapons of shame, these weapons should be used to protect the people, and not be used against them. That's why we've decided to be with the people."

A key test will be the impact of the return from exile of a leading opposition figure, Hassan Mushaimaa of the Haq movement, one of a group of 25 on trial over an alleged coup plot. "These peaceful Muslim people are coming today to raise the flag of the homeland," said Sheikh Hussein Al-Deehi, deputy head of another opposition group, the Shi'ite Al-Wefaq Society. "We've been asking for freedom for decades and we've been denied it. We've lost blood but we'll keep struggling, God willing." The royal family has offered concessions – announcing the release of some convicted prisoners for example – but it is not clear whether such moves will be enough to get opposition groups to agree to talks. They have repeated demands for a constitutional monarchy to replace Bahrain's ruling dynasty.

Wednesday thousands of anti-government protesters flood Manama's Pearl Square following the release of at least 100 political prisoners - including 25 Shiite activists on trial since last year for allegedly plotting against the state. The move underlines how much the absolute rulers of the Gulf kingdom want to get reform talks with protest leaders under way. The release of the activists was one of the major demands of the emboldened political movement seeking constitutional reform. Amid concerns that the island nation's uprising could spread to Saudi Arabia, where the monarchy permits few political freedoms, King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa holds talks on the unrest with the Saudi king in Riyadh.

Jordan Wednesday. Jordan's cabinet approves laws making it easier to organize protests and will revive a government body that works to ensure basic commodities remain affordable to the poor.

Saudi Arabia Wednesday. Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah nearly doubles a development fund that helps citizens buy homes, get married and start businesses, and sets up unemployment assistance for the first time. The move pumps 40 billion riyals ($10.7 billion) into the fund, in a step that appears aimed at shoring up popular support and fending off unrest that has spread to neighboring Bahrain. The measures were ordered by the king even before he returned Wednesday to Saudi Arabia. The 86-year-old monarch was abroad for medical treatment in the United States and recuperation in Morocco. Other measures include a 15 percent cost of living adjustment for government workers, a year of unemployment assistance for youth and nearly doubling to 15 individuals the size of families that are eligible for state aid.

Yemen. Thousands stream into a square in the capital of Sanaa, trying to bolster anti-government protesters after club-wielding backers of President Ali Abdullah Saleh tried to drive them out. Amnesty International says two people are killed in Sanaa. Protesters also rally in the Red Sea city of Hodeida, the southern port of Aden and the eastern port city of al-Mukalla. The demonstrators are calling for the ouster of Saleh, who has ruled for 32 years. Saleh's promises not to run for re-election in 2013 or to set up his son as an heir have failed to quell the anger. Also, seven lawmakers who belong to Saleh's ruling Congress Party resign from the group because of the situation in the country and say they will form their own independent bloc. The resignations raise to nine the number of legislators who left the party since protests began nearly a month ago.

24.02.2011. News, comments and anarchist actions related to Egypt, Tunisia & Libya and other Arab countries Thursday:

Egypt: 'Fridays are the main direct action days, but continued protests at Tahrir Square are also a tourist attraction,' was the anarchists' main resolution 12.02.2010. The Anarchist International - AI/IFA, and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section now call for mass demonstrations for freedom and democracy and against the totalitarian right fascist autocratic rule of Tantawi - Mubarak's Poodle, in Cairo -Tahrir Square, and all over Egypt tomorrow Friday 25.02.2011.

The present situation of continued revolt in Egypt is just an embryo-revolution, it may result in a) an abortion, an aborted revolution, or b) a real revolution, i.e. with substance. The revolution may in a way be seen as ongoing, but it is just an embryo-revolution - and no real revolution yet.

We call for an end of the present totalitarian right fascist autocratic regime, and a steady and orderly movement of the Egyptian social, i.e. economic and political/administrative - system towards real democracy, i.e. anarchy - a real revolution and continued increased libertarian degree, see System theory - Chapter V. B.! A development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions - more and more, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, including mass actions & industrial actions, and via organization, dialog and elections!

Anarchists and UN hail Egyptian, Tunisian moves to restore tourism. The UN World Tourism Organisation welcomed Thursday moves by Egypt and Tunisia to restore normality to their key tourism sectors after the popular uprisings that toppled the leaders of both countries. Both nations are favored destinations for Europeans seeking Mediterranean sun and ancient ruins but tourists fled the two countries in droves after the protests erupted last month, first in Tunisia, then in Egypt. The upheaval of recent weeks and media coverage of days of violent clashes have combined to scare off visitors although Western capitals like London and Paris have eased their travel warnings to both nations as the dust settles.

The Madrid-based UN World Tourism Organisation said it "welcomes efforts by the national authorities of Egypt and Tunisia to restore confidence among tourists and by foreign governments to update travel advisories accordingly." "Tourism is a central component of both countries' economies and, as tourists begin to return, can play an important role in overall economic recovery," it added in a statement. The head of the UN tourism body, Jordan's Taleb Rifai, said he was "pleased to see that travel advisories have been kept accurate, confined to the affected areas and regularly updated."

Egypt, ruled by the military since the ouster on February 11 of President Hosni Mubarak, reopened its historic sites, including the great pyramids and the antiquities museum in Cairo, to tourism on Sunday. Both Egypt and Tunisia are mostly calm for now but tourism experts say the fear of a backslide into chaos is likely to deter many visitors in the short term. Egypt reported 12 million international tourist arrivals in 2009 and preliminary results for 2010 are 14 million arrivals, who generated 12.5 billion dollars (9.1 billion euros) in tourism receipts that year, according to the World Travel Organisation. Tunisia received seven million international visitors in 2009, the last year for which figures are available, who generated 3.0 billion dollars in tourism receipts. The anarchists mostly agree with the UN World Tourism Organisation.

Regime forces attack rebelling Libyans near capital, 12 dead; Gadhafi blames bin Laden, Associated Press reported: Army units and militiamen loyal to Moammar Gadhafi [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] struck back against rebellious Libyans who have risen up in cities close to the capital Thursday, attacking a mosque where many were holding an anti-government sit-in and battling with others who had seized control of an airport. A doctor at the mosque said 10 people were killed. Gadhafi accused al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden of being behind the uprising in Libya, in a rambling phone call to state TV. The Libyan leader said the more than week-long revolt has been carried out by young men hopped up on hallucinogenic pills given to them "in their coffee with milk, like Nescafe."

"Shame on you, people of Zawiya, control your children," he said, addressing residents of the city outside Tripoli where the mosque attack took place. "They are loyal to bin Laden," he said of those involved in the uprising. What do you have to do with bin Laden, people of Zawiya? They are exploiting young people ... I insist it is bin Laden." The attacks Thursday aimed to push back a revolt that has moved closer to Gadhafi's bastion in the capital, Tripoli. Most of the eastern half of Libya has already broken away, and parts of Gadhafi's regime have frayed.

In the latest blow to the Libyan leader, a cousin who is one of his closest aides, Ahmed Gadhaf al-Dam, announced that he has defected to Egypt in protest against the regime's bloody crackdown against the uprising, denouncing what he called "grave violations to human rights and human and international laws." In Zawiya, 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, an army unit attacked the city' Souq Mosque, where regime opponents had been camped for days in a protest calling for Gadhafi's ouster, a witness said.The soldiers opened fire with automatic weapons and hit the mosque's minaret with fire from an anti-aircraft gun, he said.

Some of the young men among the protesters, who were inside the mosque and in a nearby lot, had hunting rifles for protection. A doctor at a field clinic set up at the mosque said he saw the bodies of 10 dead, shot in the head and chest, as well as arond 150 wounded. The witness said that a day earlier an envoy from Gadhafi had come to the city and warned protesters, "Either leave or you will see a massacre." Zawiya is a key city near an oil port and refineries. After Thursday's assault, thousands massed in Zawiya's main Martyrs Square by the mosque, shouting "leave, leave," in reference to Gadhafi, the witness said. "People came to send a clear message: We are not afraid of death or your bullets," he said.

The other attack came at a small airport outside Misrata, Libya's third largest city, where rebel residents claimed control Wednesday. Militiamen with rocket-propelled grenades and mortars barraged a line of them who were guarding the airport, some armed with automatic rifles and hunting rifles, said one of the rebels who was involved in the battle. During the fighting, the airport's defenders seized an anti-aircraft gun used by the militias and turned it against them, he said. A medical official at a military air base by the airport said two people were killed in the fighting - one from each side - and five were wounded. He said personnel at the base had sided with the Misrata uprising and had disabled fighter jets there to prevent them being used against rebellious populaces.

"Now Misrata is totally under control of the people, but we are worried because we squeezed between Sirte and Tripoli, which are strongholds of Gadhafi," he said. Sirte, a center for Gadhafi's tribes, lies to the southeast of Misrata. The militias pulled back in the late morning. In Misrata, the local radio - controlled by the opposition like the rest of the city - called on residents to march to the airport to reinforce it, said a woman who lives in downtown Misrata. In the afternoon, it appeared fighting erupted again, she said, reporting heavy booms from the direction of the airport on the edge of the city, located about 120 miles (200 kilometers) east of Tripoli. The witnesses around Libya spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals.

Gadhafi's crackdown has so far helped him maintain control of Tripoli, a city that holds about a third of Libya's 6 million population. But the uprising has divided the country and threatened to push it toward civil war: In cities across the east, residents rose up and overwhelmed government buildings and army bases, joined in many cases by local army units that defected. In those cities, tribal leaders, residents and military officers have formed local administrations, passing out weapons looted from the security forces' arsenals. The leader's cousin, Gadhaf al-Dam, is one of the most high level defections to hit the regime so far, after many ambassadors around the world, the justice minister and the interior minister all sided with the protesters. Gadhaf al-Dam belonged to Gadhafi's inner circle, officially his liaison with Egypt, but he also served as Gadhafi's envoy to other world leaders and frequently appeared by his side. In a statement issued in Cairo on Thursday, Gadhaf al-Dam said he had left Libya for Egypt "in protest and to show disagreement" with the crackdown.

Gadhafi's control now has been reduced to the northwest corner around Tripoli, the southwest deserts and parts of the center. The uprisings in Misrata, Zawiya and several small towns between the capital and Tunisian border have further whittled away at that bastion. The Zawiya resident said that until Thursday's attack, Gadhafi opponents held total sway in the city after police fled days earlier. Residents had organized local watchgroups to protect government buildings and homes. The capital, Tripoli, saw an outbreak of major protests against Gadhafi's rule earlier this week, met with attacks by militiamen that reportedly left dozens dead.

Pro-Gadhafi militiamen - a mix of Libyans and foreign mercenaries - have clamped down on the city since the Libyan leader went on state TV Tuesday night and called on his supporters to take back the streets. Residents say militiamen roam Tripoli's main avenues, firing the air, while neighborhood watch groups have barricaded side streets trying to keep the fighters out and protesters lay low. At the same time, regular security forces have launched raids on homes around the city. A resident in the Ben Ashour neighborhood said a number of SUVs full of armed men swept into his district Wednesday night, broke into his neighbor's home and dragged out a family friend as women in the house screamed.

He said other similar raids had taken place on Thursday in other districts. "Now is the time of secret terror and secret arrests. They are going to go home to home and liquidate opponents that way, and impose his (Gadhafi's) control on Tripoli," said the witness. Another Tripoli resident said armed militiamen had entered a hospital, searching for protesters among the injured. He said a friend's relative being treated there escaped only because doctors hid him. International momentum has been building for action to punish Gadhafi's regime for the bloodshed...

Earlier Thursday, Libyan TV showed Egyptian passports, CDs and cell phones purportedly belonging to detainees who had allegedly confessed to plotting "terrorist" operations against the Libyan people. Other footage showed a dozen men lying on the ground, with their faces down, blindfolded and handcuffed. Rifles and guns were laid out next to them.

The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, repeated: "We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days or weeks!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!!"

Algeria lifts state of emergency after 19 years: official. Algeria on Thursday lifted its state of emergency, 19 years after it was imposed, according to a decree published in the official gazette. President Abdelaziz Bouteflika has "ordered the cancellation of the extension of the emergency measure put in place by presidential decree on February 9, 1992," said a statement published on the state newspaper. His cabinet on Tuesday said the move was imminent after it adopted a draft order repealing the emergency measures, which the government adopted when islamists waged a protracted guerrilla war following the cancellation of local election results in 1991.

Those results would have given a majority to the now-dissolved Islamic Salvation Front. Bouteflika pledged three weeks ago to lift the state of emergency as demanded by the opposition following unprecedented protests last month that left five people dead and more than 800 injured. The state of emergency gave free rein to security forces that effectively served to repress political freedom. The 1990s war turned into a bloodbath, killing up to 200,000 people, according to official figures.

Ending the emergency powers was one of the key demands of the opposition. Algeria - like other countries in the region - has recently witnessed demonstrations for greater freedoms. There have also been riots over rising food prices. The move is seen as a concession to opposition parties and human rights activists, who have been staging marches calling for democracy and greater freedoms. President Bouteflika said protests in the capital Algiers would still be banned. Inspired by popular revolts across the Arab world, the opposition says its supporters will rally every Saturday in the capital until there has been a change in the regime. 

25.02.2011. News and comments related to Egypt Friday. Introduction: The heads of the present right fascist hydra must be cleaved off. Call for action today! Later: mass action! Also news from Libya and other Arab countries.

Introduction: The demission of Mubarak does not mean the end of the right fascist regime in Egypt. Nevertheless, it represents the cleaving off of its main head (there are several heads of this fascist hydra). It is expected that the regime will work on a recycled version of itself, maintaining the maximum of the old policy it can afford. That is why the  regime, lots of news-media and some other forces try to de-politicize the popular demands  and to focus on the narrow circle around Mubarak being responsible for all the evil. Nevertheless, any new economic-political system in Egypt in the future will have to take the Egyptian people more seriously than Mubarak did.

The victory of the Egyptians is a victory of libertarians all over the world. A battle has been won, but the final victory is still ahead - the total removal of the right fascist system. To prevent a set-back, it is indispensible to raise the demand to take over the "transition period" from the hands of the government set by Mubarak and maintained by the army. The new constitution must be drafted by a new constituent assembly set together by the representative activists of the uprising. A serious democratic and economical change in favor of the people is only possible by the removal of the present regime. Issues of freedom, social justice, etc., can not be separated from the question of democratization. All the heads of this right fascist hydra must be cleaved off.

The Anarchist International - AI/IFA, and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section call for mass demonstrations for freedom and democracy and against the totalitarian right fascist autocratic rule of Tantawi - Mubarak's Poodle, in Cairo -Tahrir Square, and all over Egypt - today Friday 25.02.2011.

The present situation of continued revolt in Egypt is just an embryo-revolution, it may result in a) an abortion, an aborted revolution, or b) a real revolution, i.e. with substance. The revolution may in a way be seen as ongoing, but it is just an embryo-revolution - and no real revolution yet.

We call for an end of the present totalitarian right fascist autocratic regime, and a steady and orderly movement of the Egyptian social, i.e. economic and political/administrative - system towards real democracy, i.e. anarchy - a real revolution and continued increased libertarian degree, see System theory - Chapter V. B.! A development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions - more and more, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, including mass actions & industrial actions, and via organization, dialog and elections!

Later... Large mass demonstration at Tahrir Square. Thousands gather in Tahrir Square to protest against the present cabinet and government in general, the totalitarian right fascist autocratic regime. The people also celebrate two weeks since the downfall of Mubarak. Egypt's new military rulers, promising to guard against "counter-revolution", faced political pressure on Friday a.o.t. to purge the cabinet of ministers appointed by Hosni Mubarak as thousands of protesters gathered in Cairo. On the eve of the rally that will also celebrate two weeks since Mubarak's removal, the military, which has promised elections within six months, assured Egyptians there would be "no return to the past" of the Mubarak era.

In a gathering at Tahrir Square, which will also remind the military of the people's determination and strength that ended Mubarak's 30-year iron rule, the protesting people are urging the military to overhaul the newly appointed cabinet and install a fresh team representative for the people. Here we mean the people seen as a class as opposed to the superiors economically and/or political/administrative, i.e. the bureaucracy broadly defined, including the economical plutarchists/capitalists. "Friday is another day of protest to bring together Egyptians who bravely ousted Mubarak but still struggle as remnants of the old regime try to hang on and ruin the revolution," activist protester Sameha Metwali told Reuters.

In the fragmented political arena of the so far only embryo-revolutionary Egypt, those with wealth, whatever its source - and the bureaucracy in general, i.e. the upper classes as opposed to the people, may still be able to hold on to their power and influence, and win in the coming elections. For decades past, voting in Egypt has been determined by thuggery, bribery and manipulation. The activists of the uprising and also the Muslim Brotherhood are particularly concerned about the key portfolios of defense, interior, justice and foreign affairs and want a clean break from Mubarak's old guard.

The military, facing mass protests and strikes over pay and working conditions as well as turmoil in its western neighbor Libya, treads a fine line between granting people their new freedoms and restoring "normal life". If "normal life" means a system continuing to be a signifcant echo of the old Mubarak-regime, as it is today, i.e. still a totalitarian right fascist autocratic regime, "restoring normal life" is not acceptable by the people. Strikes, sometimes even general strike, and other industrial actions, are a part of normal life, at least in non-totalitarian countries, although perhaps not so often in the union-busting economical plutarchist USA. Having dissolved parliament and while preparing a referendum to amend the constitution to dismantle the apparatus that kept Mubarak in power, the military-junta has banned strikes and urged the nation to get back to work. Banning strikes are clearly totalitarian, contra-revolutionary.

The military-junta told the Arab world's most populous nation on Thursday night to guard against "attempts to create strife". "The military council emphasises that it will take all steps to fulfil its promises, so that there is no return to the past and the sublime goal is to achieve the hopes and aspirations of this great nation," the military said on its Facebook page. Thus they are promoting a nationalist policy, not a policy for people. Nationalism most likely means continued totalitarian right fascist autocratic regime in Egypt.

Jubilant crowds started to gather for the protest early on Friday. Men, women and children, carrying different banners and flags -- anarchist, other and many even the Egyptian national flag -- streamed towards Tahrir Square, the epicentre of the protests that toppled Mubarak. The atmosphere was festive. Mothers pushed little children in strollers. Street vendors stood at rickety sidewalk tables, hawking t-shirts, buttons, flags and stickers of all kinds, from "I love Egypt" to "January 25, 2011" -- the day Egypt's so far only embryo-revolution began -- and with other, including libertarian, slogans.

Egypt's "new" interim cabinet met for the first time on Wednesday with security high on its agenda and under attack activists of the people who want it purged of ministers appointed by ousted president Hosni Mubarak, a demand underlined by today's mass demonstrations. The interim cabinet discussed security issues in the post-Mubarak era and the provision of basic foods and subsidies. The Egyptian stock market, which closed two days after the uprising started, has announced that it will stay shut until next week.

A former diplomat, Abdallah Alashaal, was quoted by MENA news agency on Wednesday as saying he was setting up a new political party "Egypt the Free" to participate in the polls. "The establishment of the party comes within the framework and desire to make a real representation of the youth of January 25 revolution during the coming period," Alashaal said. "This "new" party of Abdallah Alashaal is very likely an attempt to hijack the embryo-revolution to make and abortion of it, by a representative of the "old guard"!" a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section said to AIIS.

In the afternoon tens of thousands rallied in Cairo's Tahrir Square, trying to keep up pressure on Egypt's military rulers to carry out real change and calling for the dismissal of holdovers from the regime of ousted President Hosni Mubarak. The downtown square had been the center of an 18-day uprising that brought down Mubarak on Feb. 11. The Egyptian military took over from Mubarak, but assigned some government affairs to a caretaker cabinet until elections can be held. Demonstrators said Friday they are worried the army is not moving quickly enough a.o.t. on repealing emergency laws, releasing political prisoners and removing members of Mubarak's regime from power.

Thousands chanted Friday that they won't leave until they see Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq, one of the Mubarak-era holdovers, removed from office. Some waved flags of Libya to show support for the uprising in the North African country next to Egypt. "We made Mubarak step down and we must make Shafiq also step down," said Safwat Hegazy, a protester from the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best-organized opposition group. Demonstrators said they would stage large rallies every Friday until their demands are met, compatible with the anarchists' policy.

Protester Wael Hassan, 32, said he felt much still needs to be done to ensure change. "Mubarak is still free and moving around. His sons and his wife and the members of his regime are still moving freely, except for a few scapegoats," he said by phone from the square, according to Associated Press. He said he is skeptical about the military's resolve to fulfill all the protesters' demands, adding that the military benefited from the old regime. "It's the people who have to force the army to change. If we leave it to the army, we'll be back to dictatorship again," he said. "The regime in Egypt is still totalitarian right fascist and autocratic!" a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section said to AIIS.

Since Mubarak's fall, the military totalitarian right fascist and autocratic rulers have disbanded both houses of parliament and promised constitutional reforms that will allow wider participation in elections, to be held within six months. They have also promised to repeal emergency laws that give security forces largely unchecked powers, though only when conditions permit - a caveat that worries protesters. Authorities have also moved against members of Mubarak's regime, arresting a number of former ministers and prominent businessmen on corruption allegations. Some two dozen ex-ministers and business leaders are under investigation. Protesters have often mentioned corruption, a clearly authoritarian tendency, as a key motive behind their movement.

Some of Friday's crowd also performed Muslim prayers in the square. In a sermon to the worshippers, Sheik Mohammed Jibril called for the dissolution of Mubarak's National Democratic Party, Egypt's official Middle East News Agency said. He falsely declared that 'God' had helped the uprising bring down bad rulers. "This is the natural end of all corruption," he said. "Lies, lies and more lies from the islamists! Remember: the totalitarian, islamist rule of Hamas, the Muslim Brotherhood's brother organization, is very corrupt!!" a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section said to AIIS, and added: "The majority of the people are for a secular administration of Egypt, NOW!!! -- and against islamist rule!!!!"

In the afternoon the Anarchist International AI/IFA commented the coverage of Egypt today by the main international newsmedia: "Reuters reported mostly in favor of economical plutarchists/capitalists and a nationalist perspective, mainly supporting the present totalitarian right fascist autocratic rule of Tantawi - Mubarak's Poodle; Associated Press reported in the same way but somewhat more objective; and the main TV-stations, such as the CNN and BBC, seem mostly to have forgotten Egypt today. As usual only AIIS reports objectively and scientfic from a democratic and the people's perspective. More people should read the IJ@ no 1/11 (41) Qatar, Tunisia, Egypt and other Arab countries on the economic-political map, updated several times every day!"...

The Anarchist International AI/IFA and IWW sent this message a.o.t. to the international newsmedia... Soon after the BBC-TV had a report and video from the mass demonstration in Cairo's Tahrir Square... and later an interview with a guy with a rather social-individualist libertarian point of view. "Not bad at all," said a spokesperson for the Anarchist International AI/IFA to AIIS. Later also CNN's Fionnuala Sweeny had a short report about the mass demonstration in Cairo's Tahrir Square, mentioning the anger against corruption and support for the Libyan people in their struggle against the rule of Moammar Gadhafi and his henchmen.

Libya Friday. Gunfire in Libya capital as protesters march, Associated Press reported: Militias loyal to Moammar Gadhafi [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] fired in the air Friday to disperse marches by regime opponents defying a fierce clampdown to attempt their first major protest in the Libyan capital Tripoli in days. Protesters streamed out of a mosque in central Tripoli after prayers, chanting for Gadhafi's ouster, and they were confronted by a force of troops and militiamen near Green Square, said one witness. The militiamen fired in the air, sending some in the anti-Gadhafi crowd running, he said. "The situation is chaotic in parts of Tripoli now," he said, adding that armed Gadhafi supporters were also speeding through some streets in vehicles. Other residents reported gunfire heard in other districts of the capital.

Later protesters said they came under fire from pro-Gadhafi militias. One man among a crowd of thousands said gunmen on rooftops and in the streets opened fire with automatic weapons and even an anti-aircraft gun. "In the first wave of fire, seven people within 10 meters (yards) of me were killed. Many people were shot in the head," the man, who was marching from Tripoli's eastern Tajoura district, told the Associated Press. "It was really like we are dogs."

The call for regime opponents march from mosques after prayers was the first attempt to hold a major anti-Gadhafi rally in the capital - the Libyan leaders biggest remaining stronghold - since bloody clashes Tuesday night. SMS messages were sent around urging, "Let us make this Friday the Friday of liberation," residents said. Starting Friday morning, Gadhafi militiamen set up heavy security around many mosques in the city, intimidating opposition worshippers. Armed young men with green armbands to show their support of Gadhafi set up checkpoints on many streets, stopping cars and searching them.

Tanks and checkpoints lined the road to Tripoli's airport, witnesses said. Tripoli, home to nearly a third of Libya's 6 million people, is the center of the territory that remains under Gadhafi's control after the uprising that began Feb. 15 swept over nearly the entire eastern half of the country, breaking cities there out of his regime's hold. Even in the pocket of northwestern Libya around Tripoli, several cities have also fallen into the hands of the rebellion. Militiamen and Gadhafi forces on Thursday were repelled in trying to take back territory in the cities of Zawiya and Misrata in fighting that killed at least 30 people. Across cities that have come under control of the rebels, tens of thousands held rallies to support their comrades in Tripoli.

Brown Card to Reuters. In the afternoon BBC reports that Reuters mentions "anarchy" related to the situation in Libya, and they both get Brown Cards (a smaller one to BBC) from the Internationa Anarchist Tribunal, for breaking the Oslo Convention. The typical fascist tactic of creating chaos (ochlarchy = mob rule broadly defined), falsely naming it "anarchy", and support for the "strong man", in this case the Colonel Gaddafi and his totalitarian, extremist, oligarchy, to do away with the "anarchy", is internationally well known. This tactic is just an extension of the very frequent Orwellian "1984" Big Brother type newspeak calling ochlarchy falsely "anarchy" to support archy in general, i.e. x-archy, where x can be anything but not 'an'; in itself an ultra-authoritarian tendency of newsmedia, etc, mentioned in the Oslo Convention. Anarchy is not ochlarchy, but real democracy. That Reuters mentions "anarchy" related to the situation in Libya only confirms their economical plutarchists/capitalists and nationalist, totalitarian, fascist perspective, false reporting seen from a democratic and the people's perspective.

Brown Card to CNN. "Quest means business" at CNN reports that the situation in Libya is not "chaos and anarchy", but also falsely indicating anarchy is lawlessness. Thus CNN also gets a Brown Card for breaking the Oslo Convention, but somewhat smaller than Reuters. The right expression is: Anarchy or Chaos, not Anarchy and Chaos. Anarchy is not lawlessness and chaos, i.e. ochlarchy - the quite opposite of anarchy. "Thus today we handed out a large Brown Card to Reuters, a medium to Richard & Co at CNN, and a very small one to BBC," said a spokesperson of the Internationa Anarchist Tribunal - ITA-APT to AIIS, ... and the we at the International Journal of Anarchism's editorial group have written it all down at IJA 1 (41).

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared: "We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days or weeks!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!! It is about time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, similar to the campaign against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen in the Balkan more or less civil wars. Gaddafi is very likely worse than the Serbian ruler!!!!"

Other Arab countries Friday. Hundreds of thousands poured out of mosques and staged protests across the Arab world Friday, some trying to shake off autocratic rulers and others pressuring embattled leaders to carry out democratic change, not only in Egypt and Libya. In Iraq, troops opened fire in several cities to push back crowds marching on government offices, killing at least 12. Scuffles were reported in Yemen, while marches Bahrain and Jordan were largely peaceful. The large crowds signaled that the push for change in North Africa and the Middle East continues to build momentum. The first anti-government protests erupted several weeks ago, toppling rulers in Tunisia and Egypt and quickly spreading to other countries.

Iraq saw its biggest and most violent anti-government protests since the wave of regional unrest began. Thousands marched on government buildings and clashed with security forces in several cities, an outpouring of anger that left 12 people dead. The protests were fueled by frustration over corruption, chronic unemployment and shoddy public services. "We want a good life like human beings, not like animals," said Khalil Ibrahim, 44, one of about 3,000 protesters in the capital, Baghdad. Demonstrators knocked down blast walls, threw rocks and scuffled with club-wielding troops who chased them down the street. Many Iraqis rail against a government that locks itself in the highly fortified Green Zone, home to the parliament and the US Embassy, and is viewed by most of its citizens as more interested in personal gain than public service. Iraq's deadliest clashes Friday were reported in the northern city of Mosul, where hundreds rallying outside a provincial council building came under fire from guards. Officials said five people were killed. The other deaths were reported in four other cities.

In Bahrain, the first Gulf state to be thrown into turmoil by the Arab world's wave of change, tens of thousands rallying in the central square demanded sweeping political concessions from the ruling monarch. Security forces made no attempt to halt the marchers, an apparent sign that Bahrain's rulers do not want more bloodshed denunciations from their Western allies. In the early stage of the two-week-old rallies, troops had used lethal force. The unrest is highly significant for Washington. Bahrain is as mentioned home to the US Navy's 5th Fleet, which is the Pentagon's main counterweight against Iran's widening military ambitions. Bahrain's Sunni monarchy, meanwhile, is under pressure from Saudi Arabia and other Gulf rulers not to yield to the Shiite-led protesters, fearing it could open footholds for Shiite powerhouse Iran.

In the Arab world's poorest country, Yemen, tens of thousands marching in the capital of Sanaa demanded that their US-backed president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, step down. It was one of the largest crowds since protests erupted earlier this month. A Muslim preacher who led Friday's prayer told protesters it was their religious duty to topple Saleh, describing him as a "devil who has driven us to the stone ages." Shouts from the crowd of "Allahu akbar," or "God is great," accompanied his words. "We are coming to take you from the presidential palace," activist Tawakul Kermal told the gathering, addressing Saleh. Yemen has a weak central government and an active branch of al-Qaeda. Saleh has promised to step down after elections in 2013, but the demonstrators want him out now. Activists have been digging in, setting up encampments in some public areas.

A record crowd turned out Friday in Jordan, where Jordan's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, has warned that citizens' patience is wearing thin with the government's "slow" moves toward reform. Hamza Mansour, a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, called for quicker steps to give Jordanians a bigger say in politics and to have them elect their prime minister - now selected by King Abdullah II. Mansour spoke to 4,000 Jordanian protesters, the largest crowd yet to take to the streets of downtown Amman for the pro-reform cause.

In Tunisia thousands protested against the government Friday. Pride is palpable on the streets of the capital six weeks after the people toppled its dictator and unleashed a wave of revolt in the Arab world. And there's an atmosphere of cautious optimism about how Tunisia's "people's revolution", a.k.a. the Jasmine revolution, so far only and embryo-revolution, is turning out. However Tunisia's caretaker government is still somewhat repressive, but foreign diplomats are flying in to pledge support. Tunisians are even offering food and assistance to displaced people pouring across their border from chaotic Libya. "Like everybody, I'm full of hope for the future, a future that was cloudy until now," said Chawki Hani, a 42-year-old engineer to Associated Press. He's especially proud that Tunisians harnessed Facebook and the Internet "to break the wall of silence that has paralyzed Arabs."

The repressive tendency was clear Friday as police fired warning shots and used tear gas to disperse a protest of thousands in front of the Interior Ministry calling for the fall of Tunisia's interim government, which is led by a longtime ally of ousted president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. As elsewhere in the Middle East, dissent in Tunisia had long been squelched, opponents were jailed or fled into exile, and people were afraid to talk politics with neighbors. The sudden, unexpected rebellion forced former Ben Ali to flee to Saudi Arabia on Jan. 14, ending 23 years of rule. Many uncertainties about the future remain. No date has yet been set for a presidential election, which would be the first free ballot in the history of Tunisia, a French colony until 1956. Fearing the unknown, nearly 6,000 Tunisians have fled on rickety boats to the Italian island of Lampedusa.

Many say change isn't coming fast enough. Protesters have waged sit-ins in the capital, saying the old guard still holds too much power. Though the government has carried out successive purges of politicians with roots in the longtime ruling party, the provisional government is still headed by Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, who was part of Ben Ali's inner circle. Rumors have swirled about Ben Ali's health, amid reports he had a stroke and is in a coma in Saudi Arabia. The new government doesn't seem to know what happened: it says it has asked Saudi Arabia whether he is dead and demanded his extradition if he is still alive. One of Ben Ali's nephews, now living in Paris, said he has had no contact with the ousted president or his wife since they fled. Mohamed Ben Moncef Trabelsi told Le Parisien newspaper that most of his relatives were behind bars now. Trabelsi also said he found online photos of people looting his house back in Tunisia - even ripping the sinks from bathroom walls - in post-revolt looting that targeted the president's family in the days after his ouster. "They left us nothing," Trabelsi said.

'I'm muslim, I'm secular, I'm Tunisian.' The violence and looting have largely subsided, though there have been sporadic incidents. A week ago, a Polish priest was found with his throat slit in the parking lot of a religious school outside the capital. It was the first deadly attack on a member of a religious minority since Ben Ali's ouster. Amid fears that islamic radicals might try to take advantage of the political vacuum in moderate Tunisia, at least 2,000 people staged a peaceful demonstration in Tunis against extremism last weekend, with one sign reading, "I'm muslim, I'm secular, I'm Tunisian." Ben Ali's flight inspired protesters in Egypt, who toppled President Hosni Mubarak. In Libya, Moammar Gadhafi [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] has been waging a bloody crackdown on pro-democracy protesters.

In recent days, thousands of Tunisians fleeing Libya, as well as several hundred Libyans and people of other nationalities, have fled across the border into Tunisia. "The Tunisian population is really expressing solidarity and being very supportive of the people who are crossing in terms of offering assistance," said Jemini Pandya, a spokeswoman for the International Organization for Migration. Tunisian doctors went to the border to care for the injured. And ordinary Tunisians have offered to donate blood and showed up with food, ready to help others going through turbulent times.

26.02.2011. Ad Libya ... about time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen ...

The situation in Libya is now in reality genocide against the people, most likely thousands murdered by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, extremist, oligarchy with severe ochlarchy. The situation in Libya is more and more similar to the more or less civil wars in the Balkan where the Serbian ruler and his henchmen were responsible for genocide. Now Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen in a similar way are responsible for genocide and rule of terror, i.e. terrorism, in Libya, against the Libyan people... The Libyan people legitimate claiming a development towards freedom & democracy and human rights - where Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, extremist, oligarchy with severe ochlarchy, stand in the way...

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, repeated: "We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days or weeks!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!! It is about time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, similar to the campaign against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen in the Balkan more or less civil wars. Gaddafi is very likely worse than the Serbian ruler!!!!"

Also, after a lot of discussion in the past week, the US has announced sanctions against the Libyan government. The United States also closed its embassy in Tripoli on Friday. On Friday night President Barack Obama signed an executive order blocking property and transactions related to the country. Transactions involving assets of Muammar Gaddafi and some close associates were blocked. US banks have been put on alert. But the New York Times reported, from the American perspective: With Colonel Qaddafi [a.k.a. Gaddafi] killing more of his people every day in a desperate bid to remain in power, it was not clear that these actions would do much to mitigate the worsening crisis.

Sanctions, for instance, take time to put in place, and every other option comes with its own set of complications. Colonel Qaddafi, increasingly erratic, has seemed to shrug off outside pressure, becoming even more bizarre — with charges that protesters are on drugs — in the face of the world's scorn. And unlike with Egypt and Bahrain, close American allies that also erupted into crisis, the United States has few contacts deep inside the Libyan government, and little personal sway with its leadership."Libya and the United States resumed full diplomatic relations only in 2008; before that it was regarded as an outlaw state. In fact, even as he was announcing that the Obama administration was cutting off military to military cooperation with the Libyan Army, Mr. Carney noted that such cooperation was "limited" — a stark contrast to the deep ties that the Pentagon has cultivated with other Arab armies.

The tougher American response came nine days into the Libyan crisis and six days after Colonel Qaddafi's security forces first opened fire on protesters at a funeral in Benghazi, plunging Libya into something close to civil war and igniting worldwide condemnation. In the days after, the Obama administration repeatedly called for an end to the violence, but avoided criticizing Colonel Qaddafi by name — a cautious policy that brought criticism from the president's Republican rivals. Countering those criticisms, administration officials said they feared a hostage crisis, which tied President Obama's hands until American citizens, diplomats and their families were evacuated from Libya. A ferry with 167 Americans left Tripoli on Friday afternoon, having been delayed for two days by 15- to 18-foot waves in the Mediterranean, and a charter plane with additional Americans left Friday night. The embassy, Mr. Carney said, "has been shuttered."

European leaders have been more aggressive. President Nicolas Sarkozy of France has called on Colonel Qaddafi to resign, a step that Mr. Obama has yet to take. But American allies and the United Nations also moved to isolate Libya diplomatically. A senior United Nations official said that the world should intervene to stop the bloodshed in Libya, and France and Britain called on the international organization to approve an arms embargo and sanctions. NATO said it was ready to help evacuate refugees. In Geneva, the normally passive United Nations Human Rights Council voted unanimously on Friday to suspend Libya's membership, but not before a junior delegate of the Libyan mission announced that he and his colleagues had resigned after deciding to side with the Libyan people. The gesture drew a standing ovation and a handshake from the United States ambassador, Eileen Donahoe.

Administration officials said that getting the people around Colonel Qaddafi to abandon him is a key part of the American and international strategy to isolate him. Administration officials say they are supporting a British proposal to try to bring before a war crimes tribunal Colonel Qaddafi and those who support or enable his violent crackdown. "It's hard to do, but the point is to encourage the remaining supporters of Qaddafi to peel off," said Robert Malley, the Middle East and North Africa program director at the International Crisis Group. "If you want to accelerate his demise, you send the message that those who do not participate in the violence might not be prosecuted for their association with the regime."

American officials are also discussing a no-flight zone over Libya to prevent Colonel Qaddafi from using military aircraft against demonstrators. But such a move would have to be coordinated with NATO, and would require a Security Council resolution, diplomats said. Arab governments might object on sovereignty grounds. Administration officials have avoided public discussion of additional military options. When asked whether the United States was considering using its military assets in the region — including a marine amphibious ship in the Red Sea — to support the rebellion in Libya, Mr. Carney said, "We are not taking any options off the table in the future." But administration officials said there were no immediate plans to intervene militarily.

The administration's measures appeared to satisfy human-rights groups. Analysts said they wanted more details about the sanctions, but they were encouraged by signs that the United States would support the effort to have Colonel Qaddafi referred to the International Criminal Court on war-crimes charges, as well as by a special NATO meeting. "Even if people aren't explicitly talking about no-fly zones, the fact that NATO met today suggests there is more on people's minds than diplomacy," said Tom Malinowski, the director of the Washington office of Human Rights Watch. "I sense military contingencies are on the table." One complication that could speed up consideration of any military action would be evidence that Colonel Qaddafi was prepared to use his remaining stockpile of mustard gas.

The American sanctions will also include travel bans against Colonel Qaddafi and senior members of his government, and the freezing of assets, including a move to freeze all American-controlled portions of Libya's sovereign wealth fund, administration officials said. Sanctions, once they go into effect, could have an impact on oil-rich Libya. According to an American diplomatic cable obtained by WikiLeaks, a senior Libyan official told American diplomats in January 2010 that the Libyan Investment Authority, which manages the country's oil revenue, had $32 billion in cash, and that several American banks managed up to $500 million in each of those funds. Administration officials said they planned to go after that money as part of the punitive sanctions.

"The government of Libya has claimed that it holds as much as $130 billion in reserves and its sovereign wealth fund reportedly holds more than $70 billion in foreign assets," an Obama administration official said. The official said that "while we are aware of certain assets owned by the Libyan government in the US, there are likely additional funds that we are not aware of." Analysts said that going after the assets of Colonel Qaddafi's aides would probably be more effective than going after those held by the leader himself, given that he is engaged in an all-or-nothing defense of his rule.

A more draconian approach, suggested Danielle Pletka, an expert on sanctions at the American Enterprise Institute, would be to impose a trade embargo on Libya, excepting only food and other humanitarian aid. The United Nations Security Council will discuss a proposal backed by France and Britain for multilateral sanctions, including an arms embargo and financial sanctions. But no definitive move was expected until next week. Italy, which is not in the Security Council and has deep investments in Libya, said Friday that it also backed sanctions.

NB! Lots of sub-Saharan Africans are stranded in Libya, where they say they are being attacked by people accusing them of being mercenaries fighting for Colonel Gaddafi. Also many other foreigners, thousands, are stuck in the country... "It is important to get possible hostages of Gaddafi and his henchmen out of the country soon!" said general H. Mann of the Anarchist International Security Council (AISC), and added: "Take a look at Strategy and tactics, with links... especially the links!" Co-editor G. Johnson of AIIS declared:"Most of the members of The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections are de facto acting generals... all on equal footing - none above!!"

Armed pro-Gadhafi gangs roll in Libyan capital, Associated Press reported: The embattled Libyan regime passed out guns to civilian supporters, set up checkpoints Saturday and sent armed patrols roving the terrorized capital to try to maintain control of Moammar Gadhafi's [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] stronghold and quash dissent as rebels consolidate control elsewhere in the North African nation. Residents of its eastern Tajoura district spread concrete blocks, large rocks and even chopped-down palm trees as makeshift barricades to prevent the SUVs filled with young men wielding automatic weapons from entering their neighborhood - a hotspot of previous protests. With tensions running high in Tripoli, scores of people in the neighborhood turned out at a funeral for a 44-year-old man killed in clashes with pro-regime forces. Anwar Algadi was killed Friday, with the cause of death listed as "a live bullet to the head," according to his brother, Mohammed.

Armed men in green armbands, along with uniformed security forces check those trying to enter the district, where graffiti that says "Gadhafi, you Jew," "Down to the dog," and "Tajoura is free" was scrawled on walls. Outside the capital, rebels held a long swath of about half of Libya's 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) Mediterranean coastline where most of the population lives, and even captured a brigadier general and a soldier Saturday as the Libyan army tried to retake an air base east of Tripoli. The state-run news agency also said the opposition held an air defense commander and several other officers. On Friday, pro-Gadhafi militiamen - including snipers - fired on protesters trying to mount the first significant anti-government marches in days in Tripoli.

Gadhafi, speaking from the ramparts of a historic Tripoli fort, told supporters to prepare to defend the nation as he faced the biggest challenge to his 42-year rule. "At the suitable time, we will open the arms depot so all Libyans and tribes become armed, so that Libya becomes red with fire," Gadhafi said. The international community toughened its response to the bloodshed, while Americans and other foreigners were evacuated from the chaos roiling the North African nation. The UN Security Council began deliberations to consider an arms embargo against the Libyan government and a travel ban and asset freeze against Gadhafi, his relatives and key members of his government. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said some estimates indicate more than 1,000 people have been killed in less than two weeks since the protests broke out in Libya.

President Barack Obama [as mentioned] signed an executive order Friday freezing assets held by Gadhafi and four of his children in the United States. The Treasury Department said the sanctions against Gadhafi, three of his sons and a daughter also apply to the Libyan government. In Tripoli, most residents stayed in their homes Saturday, terrified of bands of armed men at checkpoints and patrolling the city. A 40-year-old business owner said he had seen Gadhafi supporters enter one of the regime's Revolutionary Committee headquarters Saturday and leave with arms. He said the regime is offering a car and money to any supporters bringing three people with them to join the effort. "Someone from the old revolutionary committees will go with them so they'll be four," the witness said when reached by telephone from Cairo. "They'll arm them to drive around the city and terrorize people."

Other residents reported seeing trucks full of civilians with automatic rifles patrolling their neighborhoods. Many were young, even teenagers, and wore green arm bands or cloths on their heads to show their affiliation to the regime, residents said. All spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals. Tripoli, home to about a third of Libya's population of 6 million, is the center of the eroding territory that Gadhafi still controls. Even in the Gadhafi-held pocket of northwestern Libya around Tripoli, several cities have also fallen to the rebellion. Militiamen and pro-Gadhafi troops were repelled when they launched attacks trying to take back opposition-held territory in Zawiya and Misrata in fighting that killed at least 30 people.

Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam, told [lies to] foreign journalists invited by the government to Tripoli that there were no casualties in Tripoli and that the capital was "calm." "Everything is peaceful," he said. "Peace is coming back to our country." He said the regime wants negotiations with the opposition and said there were "two minor problems" in Misrata and Zawiya. There, he said, "we are dealing with terrorist people [NB! he is one of the terrorists]," but he hoped to reach a peaceful settlement with them. Most shops in Tripoli were closed and long lines formed at bakeries as people ventured out for supplies. In the Souq al-Jomaa neighborhood, piles of ashes stood in front of a burned-out police station. Graffiti on the walls read, "Down, down with Gadhafi." Elsewhere, shattered glass and rocks littered the streets.

A law school graduate walking to his house in the Fashloum area said he had seen many people killed by snipers in recent days. "People are panicked, they are terrified. Few leave their houses. When it gets dark, you can't walk in the streets because anybody who walks is subject to be shot to death," he said. He said Gadhafi's use of force against protesters had turned him against the regime. "We Libyans cannot hear that there were other Libyans killed and remain silent," he said. "Now everything he says is a lie."

In Tripoli's Green Square, where state television has shown crowds of Gadhafi supporters in recent days, armed security men in blue uniforms were stationed around the plaza. Pro-Gadhafi billboards and posters were everywhere. A burned restaurant was the only sign of the unrest. Supporters in about 50 cars covered with Gadhafi posters drove slowly around the square, waving green flags from the windows and honking horns. A camera crew filmed the procession. Taxi driver Nasser Mohammed was among those who had a picture of Gadhafi and a green flag on his car. "Have you heard the speech last night?" he asked.

"It was great. Libyans don't want anyone but Gadhafi. He gave us loans." Mohammed, 25, said each family will receive 500 Libyan dinars (about $400) after the start of the protests, plus the equivalent of about $100 credit for phone service. State TV said the distribution will take place starting Sunday. Gadhafi loyalists manned a street barricade, turning away motorists trying to enter. After turning around, the drivers were then stopped at another checkpoint, manned by armed men in uniform, who searched cars and checked IDs of drivers and passengers.

In Misrata, a resident said the opposition was still in control of the city, which was calm Saturday, with many shops open and a local committee running civic affairs. But the opposition only held parts of the sprawling Misrata Air Base after Friday's attack by Gadhafi supporters, he added. The troops used tanks against the rebels at the base and succeeded in retaking part of it in battles with residents and army units who had joined the uprising against Gadhafi, said a doctor and a resident wounded in the battle on the edge of opposition-held Misrata, Libya's third-largest city, about 120 miles (200 kilometers) from the capital. The doctor said 25 people were killed in fighting at the base since Thursday.

The resident said pro-Gadhafi troops captured several members of the opposition Friday and now the two sides are talking about a possible swap since the opposition also captured a soldier and a brigadier general. Libyan state TV confirmed that an army Brig. Gen. Abu Bakr Ali was captured, although it said he was "kidnapped by terrorist gangs." The state-run news agency JANA also said regime opponents held the commander of the air defense's 2nd Division and several other officers.

State-run TV reported that the website of the JANA news agency was hacked. The opposition also held complete control of Sabratha, a town west of Tripoli famed for nearby ancient Roman ruins, with no police or any security forces associated with the Gadhafi regime, said Khalid Ahmed, a resident. He added that tribes were trying to organize a march on Tripoli, although a checkpoint outside the capital would stop anyone from entering. "All of Libya is together," Ahmed said. "We are not far from toppling the regime."

Thousands of evacuees from Libya reached ports Saturday across the Mediterranean, with many more still trying to flee the North African nation by sea, air or land. More than 2,800 Chinese workers landed in Heraklion on the Greek island of Crete aboard a Greek ship Saturday, while another 2,200 Chinese arrived in Valletta, the capital of Malta, on a ship from the eastern Libyan port of Benghazi. Thousands of expatriates streamed out of Libya at the bustling Tunisian border, most of them Egyptians and Tunisians. More than 20,000 have arrived since early this week, said Heinke Veit of the European Union Humanitarian Aid group. Food, water and medical help is available, as are facilities to contact their families.

In the evening Obama called on Gaddafi to step down. Associated press reported: Obama says Gadhafi must leave 'now'. Ratcheting up the pressure, President Barack Obama on Saturday said Moammar Gadhafi [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] has lost his legitimacy to rule and urged the Libyan leader to leave power immediately. It was the first time Obama has called for Gadhafi to step down, coming after days of bloodshed in Libya. Gadhafi has vowed to fight to the end to maintain his four-decade grip on power in the North African country.

"When a leader's only means of staying in power is to use mass violence against his own people, he has lost the legitimacy to rule and needs to do what is right for his country by leaving now," the White House said in a statement, summarizing Obama's telephone conversation with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Until now, US officials have held back from such a pronouncement, insisting it is for the Libyan people to determine who their leader should be. Obama commented a day after the administration [as mentioned above] froze all Libyan assets in the US that belong to Gadhafi, his government and four of his children. The US also closed its embassy in Libya and suspended the limited defense trade between the countries.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced further sanctions Saturday, revoking visas for senior Libyan officials and their immediate family members. She said future applications from those blacklisted for travel to the United States would be rejected. Gadhafi "should go without further bloodshed and violence," Clinton said in a separate statement.

Obama has been holding a series of discussions with world leaders about the unrest in Libya. The administration is hoping that the world speaks with a single voice against Gadhafi's violent crackdown on protesters, and the president is sending Clinton to Geneva on Sunday to coordinate with foreign policy chiefs from several countries. [As mentioned above] the US tone shifted sharply on Friday after Americans in Libya were evacuated from the country by ferry and a chartered airplane. Shortly after, Obama signed an executive order outlining financial penalties designed to pressure Gadhafi's government into halting the violence.

27.02.2011. Ad Libya Sunday... Even more about time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen ... And in Tunisia 'old guard' interim PM resigns ... Oman ...

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared in a joint statement, to AIIS: Many more Libyan people have been killed Saturday and today by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen. The situation in Libya is in reality genocide against the people, most likely thousands murdered by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, extremist, oligarchy with severe ochlarchy.

The situation in Libya is more and more similar to the more or less civil wars in the Balkan where the Serbian ruler and his henchmen were responsible for genocide. Now Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen in a similar way are responsible for genocide and rule of terror, i.e. terrorism, in Libya, against the Libyan people. Quite legitimate the Libyan people are claiming a development towards freedom & democracy and human rights - where Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, extremist, oligarchy with severe violent ochlarchy, stand in the way...

In the Balkan more or less civil wars, the international anarchist movement (i.e. at that time IFA, see The official link-site of AI/IFA) via the AIIS/AIT was among the first to call for NATO airstrikes and bombing of the Serbian ruler and his henchmen, responsible for genocide - to stop this crime against humanity. The Americans and thus NATO waited far too long, but at last took relevant action against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen. This time we expect a more quick action, including direct actions, against the terror rule, i.e. terrorism, and genocide by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, murdering the Libyan people.

As mentioned lots of sub-Saharan Africans are stranded in Libya, where they say they are being attacked by people accusing them of being mercenaries fighting for Colonel Gaddafi. Also many other foreigners, thousands, are stuck in the country... It is important to get possible hostages of Gaddafi and his henchmen out of the country soon! And take a look at Strategy and tactics, with links... especially the links! Remember: most of the members of The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections are de facto acting generals... all on equal footing - none above!! Thus listen to our advice!

We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days rather than weeks!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!! It is about time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, similar to the campaign against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen in the Balkan more or less civil wars. Gaddafi is very likely worse than the Serbian ruler!!!!

About an hour after the above anarchist resolution was published around 00.30 GMT + 1 early Sunday, the UN made a move. CNN reported: UN Security Council comes down on Gadhafi as opposition takes shape. The UN Security Council voted unanimously Saturday night [i.e. early Sunday morning GMT + 1] to punish Moammar Gadhafi's government in Libya for violence against unarmed civilians, hours after the nation's budding opposition picked a former top official as its interim leader [i.e. UNSC Resolution 1970.]

City councils in areas no longer loyal to Gadhafi have chosen former Justice Minister Mustafa Abdul Jalil to head an interim government that would represent all of Libya and ultimately be based in Tripoli, according to Amal Bogagies, a member of the coalition of the February 17 Uprising, and a separate Libyan opposition source. Both are based in Benghazi. Jalil was in Gadhafi's government through February 21, when he quit to protest the "bloody situation" and "use of excessive force" against unarmed protesters, according to Libyan newspaper Quryna. Days later, he told a Swedish newspaper he had evidence that Gadhafi ordered the 1988 bombing of a jet over Lockerbie, Scotland, that killed 270 people.

Ibrahim Dabbashi, Libya's deputy ambassador to the United Nations who earlier voiced opposition to Gadhafi's government along with a host of other diplomats, told CNN that "we support ... in principle" a caretaker government led by Jalil. [There is an 'old guard' power problem here similar to in Tunisia and Egypt, according to IIFOR] Meanwhile, across the Atlantic at United Nations headquarters in New York, the 15-member Security Council agreed to slap new sanctions on Gadhafi's government and referring the strongman to the International Criminal Court for alleged crimes against humanity. Military and security forces loyal to Gadhafi have killed more than 1,000 people, the United Nations estimated [NB! This is an old and too low estimate, according to IIFOR].

Libya's foreign minister earlier Saturday said that talks are underway between Moammar Gadhafi's government and figures in the eastern part of the North African nation. Benghazi-based opposition spokesman Jalal Igallal, however, strongly knocked down reports of any discussions between anti-government figures and officials in Gadhafi's regime. He urged Foreign Minister Musa Kasa to say who is being talked to, if such negotiations are in fact ongoing. Protests began February 15 in the eastern city of Benghazi, Libya's second largest. It and many others are now thought to be under opposition control, according to eyewitnesses. There have been numerous reports of widespread violence, some of it perpetrated by foreign mercenaries and military and security forces loyal to Gadhafi.

Kasa, the foreign minister, told CNN's Nic Robertson that the country was close to a civil war situation. Earlier Saturday, Saif al-Islam Gadhafi -- one of Moammar's sons and a top official in his government -- blamed foreigners and wayward youth for the bloodshed, while telling reporters that "life is normal" in Tripoli and that the unrest had ceased. "The Libyan people, they woke up and now they realize the danger around them," Saif Gadhafi told Channel 4 immediately after a media presentation Saturday. "We are more united, we are more optimistic, and we are much stronger." While CNN does have staff in some cities, the network could not independently confirm reports for many areas in Libya. But CNN has compiled information through telephone interviews with witnesses.

Tripoli itself was noticeably tense but largely quiet overnight Saturday, its streets largely barren except for police, armed men in civilian clothing and young people with sticks at some intersections. One man, who is not named for safety reasons, described an "eerie feeling" around the capital, even as fear of violence drove many people to hunker down in their homes. "You can feel the tension and the anticipation that something big is going to happen," he said. "Everyone is waiting for it."

The situation at the main airport, about 20 miles south of Tripoli, was far more chaotic. Several thousand people camped outside in makeshift tents, waiting for the chance to leave the war-torn country.  More than 200 Arab organizations and a group of 30 prominent intellectuals from across the Middle East and North Africa urged global bodies, including the Security Council, the European Union and the African Union, to take action to limit further death and destruction [i.e. may be echoing the anarchists first call 25.02.2011 "... for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen..."].

"We fear we may be witnessing the calm before the storm," said their statement. "The window of opportunity to prevent further atrocities from occurring is closing fast. The people of Libya need you to act quickly and decisively."  The group urged the international community to devise contingency plans for intervention and impose immediate sanctions on the Libyan regime. "We appeal to you as leaders who have the power to bring an end to this horror," the statement said. "Your failure to do so would be a lasting stain on the responsibilities of world leadership and on humanity itself."

[As earlier reported in this issue of IJA] US President Barack Obama also weighed in Saturday, telling German Chancellor Angela Merkel to "coordinate our urgent efforts to respond to developments and ensure appropriate accountability," according to a White House statement. In some of his strongest wording to date, Obama said, "when a leader's only means of staying in power is to use mass violence against his own people, he has lost the legitimacy to rule and needs to do what is right for his country by leaving now." Later, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton issued a statement urging Gadhafi to step down. "Moammar Gadhafi has lost the confidence of his people and he should go without further bloodshed and violence," Clinton said. "The Libyan people deserve a government that is responsive to their aspirations and that protects their universally recognized human rights."

Tripoli's Green Square, occupied by pro-Gadhafi demonstrators on previous evenings, was empty Saturday night, a witness told CNN. She said her neighborhood near the square was eerily quiet. Another man said men carrying automatic weapons had set up checkpoints at "every major intersection or traffic light," while hospitals are heavily guarded by armed security personnel. Other frightened residents said they stayed indoors, though unable to shut off the sound of gunfire or put aside the words of Gadhafi in a public address the day before in which he vowed to keep unleashing force. "We can destroy any assault with the people's will, with the armed people," he said [by 'people' meaning his own henchmen, not the Libyan people] on state television Friday. "And when it is necessary, the weapons depots will be open to all the Libyan people to be armed." Libya's prime minister, meanwhile, announced [as mentioned above] on state television that every family would receive 500 Libyan dinars ($406) from the government.

The humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders said in a statement Saturday one of its teams was in Benghazi, Libya's second-biggest city. Their arrival, and a promise of future aid, marked one of the first humanitarian inroads into Libya in recent weeks.  Three main hospitals were all "well equipped and have managed to deal with the numbers of wounded people and medical needs," according to the group. But the facilities also face shortages of drugs, bandages and other medical items, which Doctors Without Borders said it will provide. The group plans to send an orthopedic surgeon, anesthesiologist and nurse on Monday.

The advocacy group Human Rights Watch said the situation was appreciably worse in Zawiya -- about 55 kilometers (35 miles) west of Tripoli and the epicenter of violent protests Thursday. "West of Tripoli in Zawiya city, government security forces firing on demonstrators are causing bloodshed and chaos," said Sarah Leah Whitson, the group's Middle East and North Africa director. Operations at several embassies -- including those of Great Britain and the United States -- in Tripoli have been effectively shuttered, for the safety of their personnel. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said he planned to speak with Obama in Washington on Monday.

For now, Libyans themselves are left to wait to see what happens next. "We wait and see what tomorrow will bring," a Tripoli man said early Sunday. "We pray for a quick ending to this nightmare, with minimum bloodshed. No one is naive, however, to believe that Gadhafi is going to go easily." ... A Libyan said: US 'doesn't give a damn' according to a CNN video-title. 

The New York Times later reported: Security Council Calls for War Crimes Inquiry in Libya: The United Nations Security Council voted unanimously on Saturday night to impose sanctions on Libya's leader, Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] and his inner circle of advisers, and called for an international war crimes investigation into "widespread and systemic attacks" against Libyan citizens who have protested against his government over the last two weeks. The vote, thought to be the first time the Security Council has voted unanimously to refer a member state to the International Criminal Court, came on the same day that President Obama [a.k.a. the US-oracle and 'the mouse and not a man'] said that Colonel Qaddafi had lost the legitimacy to rule and should step down.

Mr. Obama's statement, which the White House said was made during a telephone call with Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, was the strongest statement yet from any American official against Colonel Qaddafi. The Security Council resolution also imposes an arms embargo against Libya, an international travel ban on 16 Libyan leaders and freezes the assets of Colonel Qaddafi and members of his family, including seven of his sons and a daughter. Also included in the sanctions were measures against defense and intelligence officials who are believed to have played a role in the violence against civilians in Libya.

Security forces in Libya have opened fire on protesters several times in recent days, drawing international condemnation and leading the United States to close its embassy in Tripoli on Friday and impose unilateral sanctions against Libya. It froze billions of dollars of Libyan government assets and announced that it would do the same with the assets of high-ranking Libyan officials who took part in the violent crackdown. Turkey's prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, warned Saturday that sanctions would do more harm to Libya's people than to Colonel Qaddafi.

Britain and France closed their embassies in Tripoli on Saturday as well, and a pair of British military transport planes swooped into the desert south of Benghazi and picked up more than 150 civilians, the British Defense Ministry said. At the United Nations, Security Council members disagreed during deliberations Saturday whether to approve the resolution, circulated by France, Germany, Britain and the United States, that would refer Colonel Qaddafi and his top aides to the International Criminal Court for prosecution. Libya's own delegation to the United Nations, which renounced Colonel Qaddafi on Monday, sent a letter to the Security Council president, Ambassador Maria Luiza Ribeiro Viotti of Brazil, saying that it backed such a referral.

A White House account of the telephone call Saturday between Mr. Obama and Chancellor Merkel of Germany said that the two leaders reviewed options for dealing with the situation in Libya, and that the president told Mrs. Merkel that "when a leader's only means of staying in power is to use mass violence against his own people, he has lost the legitimacy to rule and needs to do what is right for his country by leaving now." A version of this article appeared in print on February 27, 2011, on page A10 of the New York edition.

Armed Gaddafi opponents hold town west of Tripoli, Reuters report: Armed men opposed to Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi were in control of Zawiyah, about 50 km (30 miles) west of the capital Tripoli, on Sunday and their red, green and black flag flew above the town. "This is our revolution," a crowd of several hundred people chanted in the center of the town where charred buildings stood pockmarked with bullet holes and burned-out vehicles lay abandoned in the streets. One man in the center of Zawiyah, who gave his name as Mustafa, said seven people were killed in the latest clashes with pro-Gaddafi security forces and many more were wounded.

"But Zawiyah is free like Misrata and Benghazi. Gaddafi is crazy. His people shot at us using rocket-propelled grenades," he said, referring to towns in the east of the country freed a week ago by a disparate coalition that combined people power with defecting military units. Another man in Zawiyah, called Chawki, said: "We need justice. People are being killed. Gaddafi's people shot my nephew. "We need help from outside. We will never use force or harm anyone. We just want our civil rights ... He (Gaddafi) has to go. There is no other way."

GOVERNMENT PUSH REPULSED. The scene in Zawiyah was another indication that Gaddafi's grip on power appears to be shrinking by the day. Reuters correspondents have found residents in some neighborhoods of the capital Tripoli proclaiming open defiance after security forces melted away. "Gaddafi is the enemy of God!" a crowd chanted on Saturday in Tajoura, a poor neighborhood of Tripoli, at the funeral of a man they said was shot down by Gaddafi loyalists the day before. Now, residents said, those security forces had disappeared. Locals had erected barricades of rocks and palm trees across rubbish-strewn streets, and graffiti covered many walls. Bullet holes in the walls of the houses bore testimony to the violence. The residents, still unwilling to be identified for fear of reprisals, said troops fired on demonstrators who tried to march from Tajoura to central Green Square overnight, killing at least five people.

The number could not be independently confirmed. Libyan state television again showed a crowd chanting their loyalty to Gaddafi in Green Square on Saturday. But journalists there estimated their number at scarcely 200. From Misrata, a major city 200 km (120 miles) east of Tripoli, residents said by telephone that a thrust by forces loyal to Gaddafi, operating from the local airport, had been rebuffed with bloodshed by the opposition. "There were violent clashes last night and in the early hours of the morning near the airport," one resident, Mohammed, told Reuters. "An extreme state of alert prevails in the city." He said several mercenaries from Chad had been detained by rebels in Misrata. The report could not be verified but was similar to accounts elsewhere of Gaddafi deploying fighters brought in from African states where he has long had allies...

UN SANCTIONS. [As mentioned above] the UN Security Council unanimously imposed travel and asset sanctions on Gaddafi and close aides, ratcheting up pressure on him to quit before any more blood is shed in a popular revolt against his rule. It also adopted an arms embargo and called for the deadly crackdown against anti-Gaddafi protesters to be referred to the International Criminal Court for investigation and possible prosecution of anyone responsible for killing civilians. Western leaders, their rhetoric emboldened by evacuations that have sharply reduced the number of their citizens stranded in the oilfields and cities of the sprawling desert state, spoke out more clearly to say Gaddafi's 41-year rule must now end... The death toll from 10 days of violence in Libya is estimated by diplomats at about 2,000. Talk of possible military action by foreign governments remained [so far] vague, however. It was unclear how long Gaddafi, with some thousands of loyalists -- including his tribesmen and military units commanded by his sons -- might hold out against rebel forces comprised of youthful gunmen and mutinous soldiers.

100,000 have fled Libya, UN refugee agency says, Reuters reported: Nearly 100,000 people have fled violence in Libya in the past week, streaming into Tunisia and Egypt in a growing humanitarian crisis, the UN refugee agency said on Sunday. They include Tunisians, Egyptians, Libyans and third country nationals including Chinese and other Asians, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said in a statement. About half of the 100,000 have gone to Tunisia and half to Egypt. "We call upon the international community to respond quickly and generously to enable these governments to cope with this humanitarian emergency," UN High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres said. The Geneva-based UNHCR began an airlift of shelter and other relief supplies on Saturday night to Djerba, Tunisia, and the aid will be brought to the Libyan border, it said.

"Ad a Libyan saying 'we need help from outside'; in addition to airstrikes and bombing of Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, the international community should supply the struggling Libyan people with arms. However several Libyans have said that they are not interested in regular ground forces from foreign powers. Furthermore, considering that a) about 100,000 have fled Libya, and b) evacuations have sharply reduced the number of citizens from Western countries stranded in Libya, c) the problem with possible hostages is mostly solved, and it is now about time for international armed actions!" said general H. Mann of the Anarchist International Security Council (AISC), and repeated: "Take a look at Strategy and tactics, with links... especially the links!"

Tunisia prime minister resigns after protests, Reuters reported: Tunisian Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi resigned on Sunday to try to smooth the way for elections in the North African state, but analysts said the move could backfire. Shortly after the announcement, security forces fired into the air in the capital Tunis to disperse hundreds of youths who were throwing rocks and smashing shop windows. Critics have accused Ghannouchi of being too close to former President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, toppled on January 14 after a series of protests that sent shockwaves across the Arab world and encouraged a similar uprising in Egypt. "My resignation will provide a better atmosphere for the new era," he said, adding he wanted to prevent more deaths. Three people have been killed since Friday in clashes between security forces and demonstrators at protests against Ghannouchi. "My resignation is in the service of the country," he said during a speech on state TV. "I am not a man of repression."

Ghannouchi restated the government's pledge to hold elections to replace Ben Ali, widely seen by Tunisians as repressive and corrupt, by July 15. Analysts said Ghannouchi's resignation had the potential to ease street tensions, but may also backfire. "The hope is that, with this concession, street protests will calm down and this will allow the government to get to the task of preparing elections," said Kamran Bokhari, regional director of the Middle East and South Asia for political risk consultancy Stratfor. "But the risk is that it will embolden the opposition forces to demand more concessions."

A Reuters witness said Tunisian soldiers had barricaded a commercial district of Tunis where youths were breaking windows and throwing stones. They fired tear gas and rounds in the air to disperse them. There was no sign of any wounded. An official at Tunisia's powerful umbrella union UGTT, which has been demanding labor reforms since Ben Ali's removal, told Reuters that Ghannouchi's resignation was "a step in the right direction." A spokesman for Tunisia's main islamist group, Ennahda, said the move could pave the way to broader participation in the interim government. Ennahda, banned for two decades under Ben Ali's rule, had complained of being shut out of the caretaker government run by Ghannouchi.

Oman police kill two in clashes with protesters, Reuters reported: Omani police fired rubber bullets at stone-throwing protesters demanding political reform on Sunday, killing two people, and demonstrators set government buildings and cars ablaze, witnesses said. The trouble in the town of Sohar, Oman's main industrial center, was a rare sign of discontent in the normally sleepy Gulf Arab sultanate and followed a wave of pro-democracy protests across the Arab world. Witnesses said more than 2,000 protesters had gathered for a second day in a square in Sohar demanding political reforms, more jobs and better pay before police tried to disperse them, first with tear gas and batons and then rubber bullets. "Two people have died after police fired rubber bullets into the crowd," one witness, who declined to be named, told Reuters from Sohar. A third person was reported in critical condition after being shot.

Another witness said the police had used live ammunition, but that could not immediately be confirmed. Troops deployed in the area, but did not intervene, witnesses said. Sultan Qaboos bin Said, trying to ease tensions in US ally Oman, reshuffled his cabinet on Saturday, a week after a small protest in the capital Muscat. He has ruled for four decades, exercising absolute power. Political parties are banned. Oman's state news agency said riots in Sohar had destroyed public and private property but did not mention any deaths. "Police and anti-riot units moved against this subversive group to protect citizens and their property, which led to some injuries," the news agency said.

Smoke billowed over a square that has been the center of protests. A Reuters journalist said a local office of the ministry of manpower was on fire, and witnesses said the main police station and another state building were burning. Oman is a non-OPEC oil exporter with strong military and political ties to Washington. Sultan Qaboos deposed his father in a 1970 palace coup to end the country's isolation and use its oil revenue for modernization. He appoints the cabinet and in 1992 introduced an elected advisory Shura Council with 84 members. Twenty five of them, unhappy with the authorities' handling of the Sohar protests, met with the government to discuss their concerns, one council member said.

POLICE STATION ATTACKED. Protesters in Sohar, after initial clashes, marched to the town's police station with petrol and matches, hoping to storm it to free comrades detained after protests on Saturday. Police tried to halt them, firing in the air and using tear gas. The protesters retreated without freeing any detainees, who were reported to have already been moved to Muscat. "The security forces pushed the protesters out of the police station," said one witness, who gave his name only as Mohammed. "There are no skirmishes now. There is calm at the moment." Helicopters circled over the town, and witnesses said troops had moved in but were not confronting protesters. "The army is neutral. They are in the middle," said Mohammed, adding that at least eight people had been hurt, apart from the two dead.

Security forces set up roadblocks on a main road between Muscat and Sohar, about 200 km (125 miles) up the Gulf of Oman coast from the capital. A spokeswoman for Sohar's port said it was operating normally. Protests also took place in the southern town of Salalah where a small number of demonstrators have camped out since Friday near the office of a provincial governor. Mostly wealthy Gulf Arab countries have stepped up measures to appease their populations following popular unrest that toppled the leaders of Tunisia and Egypt. Last week about 300 Omanis demanded political reforms and better pay in a peaceful protest in Muscat. Protesters in Oman have so far avoided calling for regime change. In mid-February, the sultanate increased the salary for national workers in the private sector by 43 percent to $520 per month. There is no official unemployment rate.

Meanwhile in Libya - Libya rebels form council and reject Gaddafi talks, Reuters reported: Rebels in eastern Libya, who have seized control of the region from Muammar Gaddafi, said on Sunday they had formed a national council to act as the face of the revolution but said it was not an interim government. Hafiz Ghoga, the spokesman for the new National Libyan Council formed after a meeting of Gaddafi opponents in the eastern city of Benghazi, also said he saw no room for talks with the Libyan leader who has lost control of large swathes of the country. "The main aim of the national council is to have a political face ... for the revolution," Ghoga told a news conference after the gathering. "We cannot call it an transition government. It is a national council," he said.

The online edition of the Libya's Quryna newspaper said on Saturday former Justice Minister Mustafa Mohamed Abud Ajleil had led the formation of an interim government based in Benghazi. Libya's envoy to the United States supported Ajleil's move. Ghoga described Ajleil initiative as his "personal view." The spokesman also dismissed talk of negotiating with Gaddafi, saying: "In my view ... there is no room for negotiation." "It is premature to talk about elections. We still have a capital under siege," he said, adding that membership of the national council and workings were still being drawn up. Tripoli is still in Gaddafi's hands. He [Ghoga] insisted that the council was seeking to keep the country united. "There is no such thing as a divided Libya," he said.

Associated Press reported: In the capital Tripoli, where Gadhafi [a.k.a. Gaddafi] is still firmly in control, state banks began handing out the equivalent of $400 per family in a bid to shore up public loyalty. "The Libyan people are fully behind me," Gadhafi defiantly told Serbian TV, even as about half of the country was turning against him and world leaders moved to isolate him. "A small group (of rebels) is surrounded ... and it will be dealt with." A day after President Barack Obama branded Gadhafi an illegitimate ruler who must leave power immediately, US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton kept up pressure for him to step down and "call off the mercenaries" and other troops that remain loyal to him.

"We are just at the beginning of what will follow Gadhafi. ... But we've been reaching out to many different Libyans who are attempting to organize in the east and as the revolution moves westward there as well," Clinton said. "I think it's way too soon to tell how this is going to play out, but we're going to be ready and prepared to offer any kind of assistance that anyone wishes to have from the United States." Two US senators said Washington should recognize and arm a provisional government in rebel-held areas of eastern Libya and impose a no-fly zone over the area - enforced by US warplanes - to stop attacks by the regime. Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam, in an interview with US television, insisted that his father won't relinquish power and that Libya had not used force or airstrikes against its own people [lies]. There were no reports of major violence or clashes on Sunday, although gunfire was heard after nightfall in Tripoli.

The regime, eager to reinforce its view that Libya is calm and under its control, took visiting journalists to Zawiya [a.k.a. Zawiyah], 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of the capital of Tripoli on Sunday. The tour, however, confirmed that anti-government rebels control the center of the city of 200,000 people, with army tanks and anti-aircraft guns mounted on pickup trucks at the ready. Hundreds of people chanted "Gadhafi out!" in central Zawiya, a key city close to an oil port and refineries. It also is the nearest population center to Tripoli to fall into rebel hands. The charred hulks of cars littered the city, many buildings were pockmarked by bullets, and most streets were blocked by felled palm trees or metal barricades. Police stations and government offices have been torched, and anti-Gadhafi graffiti - labeling him a "mass murderer" - was everywhere. In the main square, an effigy of the leader hung from a light pole with the words "Execute Gadhafi" on its chest.

"To us, Gadhafi is the 'Dracula' of Libya," said Wael al-Oraibi, an army officer in Zawiya who decided to join the rebels in large part after Gadhafi used mercenaries from sub-Saharan Africa against residents of the city. The mood in Zawiya was generally upbeat, with chants of "Free, free Libya," although the anticipation of a renewed attempt to retake the city was causing some anxiety among the rebels. "We are all wanted," said one rebel at the square who did not want to give his name for fear of reprisals. "Zawiya in our hands is a direct threat to Tripoli." On Zawiya's outskirts were pro-Gadhafi forces, also backed by tanks and anti-aircraft guns.

About 20 miles (30 kilometers) west of Zawiya, some 3,000 pro-Gadhafi demonstrators gathered on the coastal highway, chanting slogans in support of the Libyan leader. Rebels and defecting army forces largely consolidated control of Zawiya on Thursday, after an army unit loyal to Gadhafi opened fire on a mosque where residents - some armed with hunting rifles - had been holding a sit-in. The square has become the burial site of six of 11 rebels killed by pro-Gadhafi forces who failed to retake the town that day. Residents reported several skirmishes between both sides since then. At least six checkpoints controlled by troops loyal to Gadhafi stood on the road from Tripoli to Zawiya. Each one was reinforced by at least one tank, with troops who concealed their faces with scarves.

28.02.2011. Ad Libya Monday... Send in arms! Airstrikes! Very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, to avoid his probable tactic of using human shields...

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared in a joint statement, to AIIS: Many Libyan people have been killed (estimated to more than 2000 Sunday, and more will probably follow) by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen. The situation in Libya is in reality genocide against the people, thousands murdered by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist, extremist, oligarchy with severe ochlarchy.

The situation in Libya is more and more similar to the more or less civil wars in the Balkan where the Serbian ruler and his henchmen were responsible for genocide. Now Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen in a similar way are responsible for genocide and rule of terror, i.e. terrorism, in Libya, against the Libyan people. Quite legitimate the Libyan people are claiming a development towards freedom & democracy and human rights - where Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist , extremist, oligarchy with severe violent ochlarchy, stand in the way...

In the Balkan more or less civil wars, the international anarchist movement (i.e. at that time IFA, see The official link-site of AI/IFA) via the AIIS/AIT was among the first to call for NATO airstrikes and bombing of the Serbian ruler and his henchmen, responsible for genocide - to stop this crime against humanity. The Americans and thus NATO waited far too long, but at last took relevant action against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen. This time we expect a more quick action, including direct actions, against the terror rule, i.e. terrorism, and genocide by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, murdering the Libyan people.

Send in arms! Ad Libyans saying 'we need help from outside' and similar; in addition to airstrikes and bombing of Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, the international community should supply the struggling Libyan people with arms. However several Libyans have said that they are not interested in regular ground forces from foreign powers... Furthermore, considering that a) about 100,000 have fled Libya, and b) evacuations have sharply reduced the number of citizens from Western countries stranded in Libya, c) a problem with possible hostages taken by Gaddafi and his henchmen is mostly solved, and it is now very soon time for international armed actions!

Airstrikes! It is very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, to avoid his probable tactic of using human shields, mixing with civilians in Tripoli, etc. Although this tactic may backfire somewhat due to too much spreading of his troops...

And take a look at Strategy and tactics, with links... especially the links! Remember: most of the members of The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections are de facto acting generals... all on equal footing - none above!! Thus listen to our advice!

We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days rather than a week!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!! As mentioned, it is very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, similar to the campaign against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen in the Balkan more or less civil wars. Gaddafi is very likely worse than the Serbian ruler!!!!

In the evening in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, afternoon in USA, while yesterday US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said. "I think it's way too soon to tell how this is going to play out, but we're going to be ready and prepared to offer any kind of assistance that anyone wishes to have from the United States...", also military assistance is being discussed by the world's main leaders, mainly in Europe and America. It is now relatively clear that an armed support action most likely will be a joint European and American action, may be with more countries, and not an action by USA alone, according to sources of AIIS. The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections continue to push for international armed assistance as soon as possible!

Colonel Gaddafi out of touch with reality. Libya protests: Gaddafi says 'all my people love me', BBC reported: 'Col Muammar Gaddafi denies there is any fighting on the streets of Tripoli'. Libyan leader Col Muammar Gaddafi has told the BBC he is loved by all his people and has denied there have been any protests in Tripoli. Col Gaddafi said that his people would die to protect him. He laughed at the suggestion he would leave Libya and said he felt betrayed by leaders who had urged him to quit. Earlier world governments [as well as lots of labor confederations, human rights groups, etc., and The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections] condemned attacks on Libyan civilians, with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton saying Col Gaddafi must "go now". The EU on Monday imposed sanctions including an arms embargo, asset freeze and travel ban on Col Gaddafi and his close entourage. Col Gaddafi is facing a massive challenge to his 41-year rule, with protesters in control of towns in the east.

'Mercenaries and thugs'. Col Gaddafi was speaking in an interview with the BBC's Jeremy Bowen in Tripoli. Col Gaddafi accused Western countries of abandoning Libya and said that they had no morals and wanted to colonise the country. When asked whether he would resign, he said he could not step down as he did not have an official position and insistedthat the power was with the people [i.e. power over the Libyan people]. Col Gaddafi challenged those, including UK Prime Minister David Cameron, who have accused him of having money abroad to produce evidence. He said he would "put two fingers in their eye". Col Gaddafi said true Libyans had not demonstrated but those who had come on to the streets were under the influence of drugs supplied by al-Qaeda [lies].

He said those people had seized weapons and that his supporters were under orders not to shoot back [lies]. Foreign ministers who had gathered at a UN human rights conference in Geneva called earlier for Col Gaddafi to go. Mrs Clinton accused Col Gaddafi and his followers of using "mercenaries and thugs" to attack unarmed civilians, and of executing soldiers who refused to turn their guns on fellow citizens. "It is time for Gaddafi to go, now, without further violence or delay," she said. Mrs Clinton also said that although US naval vessels were being repositioned near Libya there was no military action pending. When asked whether the US would back Col Gaddafi going into exile, Mrs Clinton said: "If violence could be ended by his leaving... it might be a good step but we believe accountability must be obtained for what he has done." The US Treasury said it had blocked $30bn (£18.5bn) in Libyan assets - the largest sum it had ever frozen.

'Blood of martyrs'. Although protesters have secured towns in the east, Col Gaddafi shows no signs of giving up in and around Tripoli. In Tajoura, a suburb of the capital, about 400 people protested against him on Monday, chanting: "The blood of martyrs won't go to waste." Gaddafi supporters have reportedly tried to break up the protest by firing into the air. Reporters say there have been long queues at banks in the capital as people tried to collect the 500 dinars ($410) promised to all families by the government in an attempt to quell the unrest. There has been fighting in the coastal town of Misrata, 200km (125 miles) east of Tripoli, with Col Gaddafi's opponents repelling a government counter-attack. Anti-government forces still control Zawiya, 50km west of Tripoli, but pro-Gaddafi forces are surrounding the city. One resident told Reuters: "We are expecting attacks at any moment... They are in large numbers."

The BBC's Jim Muir says volunteers are helping to provide food and drink to those who manage to cross Libya's border with Tunisia Libyan air force planes also reportedly attacked ammunition depots in the eastern towns of Ajdabiya and Rajma. Deputy foreign minister Khaled Kaim said the authorities would attempt to talk to protesters in the east, but added: "If all attempts and efforts for dialogue... are exhausted, a very well guided force will be used in accordance with international rules." About 100,000 people have fled anti-government unrest in Libya over the past week, the UN estimates. The exodus of Egyptian workers from western Libya began on Wednesday, but has since been intensifying, says the BBC's Jim Muir at the Ras Jdir border crossing with Tunisia. About 1,000 people an hour are crossing into Tunisia, he says.

Jeremy Bowen BBC Middle East editor, Tripoli, wrote: The interview with Col Gaddafi took place in a restaurant on the seafront overlooking the port in Tripoli. He came in with his entourage, he had sunglasses on, and some kind of autumnal brown robe. He was relaxed throughout the interview. He laughed quite a bit when asked various questions. He seemed very unconcerned about foreign pressure, saying the Libyan people were behind him, the Libyan people loved him. He departed at the head of his motorcade, which consisted of dozens of vehicles. They left at high speed. To see the interview with Gaddafi at BBC, click on: Video - Libya protests: Gaddafi says 'all my people love me'! By the way: One resident told the BBC the situation in Tripoli is "not good" and he fears for the safety of his children...

 
The strategic situation in Libya 28.02.2011

Anarchist policy, strategy and tactic in North Africa and the Middle East.

IIFOR has ranked most countries in the world according to libertarian degree, based on long term average structural estimates for the coordinates on the economic-political map, see System theory and economic-political map, and also published factual estimates of the libertarian degrees, see Ranking. Both domestic and international factors are considered. Around these long term structural estimates there may be short term dips and hikes in the libertarian degree. 100 % - the libertarian degree = the authoritarian degree. The authoritarian degree is an indicator of  how dangerous, i.e. repressive economical and/or political/administrative, a government - or more general - an economic-political system is, from the people's perspective, see Class analysis. Systems with more than about 67% authoritarian degree, 666 per thousand, i.e. less than about 33,3% libertarian degree, are totalitarian and thus very repressive, dangerous, systems/regimes, see, System theory and economic-political map. As power corrupts, and the more -- the more power, in general totalitarian systems have a lot of and severe ochlarchy.

Norway is the most libertarian/anarchist country (rank no 1 - 54% libertarian/anarchy degree) and Somalia is the most authoritarian (rank no 186 - 20 % libertarian degree), with Libya ranked as no 68 (ca 32,5% libertarian degree) as a long term structural average, based on historical data, and thus both Somalia and Libya are totalitarian, and they have also fascist regimes. NB! With the present genocide and heavy repression against the people in Libya, there is a significant dip in the libertarian degree, very likely down to under 20 %. Thus at the moment Libya has the most dangerous and repressive system in the world, vis-a-vis the people.

The Anarchist International AI/IFA's main policy, a bit simplified, is in general to increase the libertarian degrees of countries, i.e. their economic-political systems, as much as much as possible, in the world in a dynamic perspective. Sometimes this implies a struggle to prevent a decline in the libertarian degree as much as possible, namely when other factors pull in the negative direction. AI/IFA puts some extra weight at a) the 3 anarchies of today, i.e. Norway, The Swiss Confederation and Iceland, and policy towards higher anarchy/libertarian degree in these countries, as they are only anarchies of rather low degree, b) to get more countries to be anarchies, e.g. of them relatively near anarchy today, c) and to improve the situations and hike the libertarian degrees in the most authoritarian - least libertarian countries. NB! Now a.o.t. Libya! In all cases AI/IFA concentrates on situations with significant momentum, e.g. popular revolt and more or less revolutions, in libertarian direction, as now in North Africa and the Middle East. Anarchys is real democracy, documented at Real democracy defined, i.e. including human rights, see Anarchism and human rights.

Fellows! The people, seen as a class in contrast to the superiors economically and/or political administrative, i.e. in income and/or rank. The present and future are in our hands! Contact AI - Click here and join the AI/IFA-network today! Be a networkmember/subscriber to the IJ@/AI/IFA-newsletters - Click here, and use the subscription link at the bottom of the page! Feel free to forward this information to your own network, and/or link up the Websites of AI/IFA at your blog or homepage. Join in the struggle for and towards anarchy and anarchism, i.e. for more socialism and autonomy; against economical plutarchy - that is capitalism; and against statism -- locally, domestic, regionally and world wide... Of course a struggle without ochlarchy (mob rule broadly defined), the opposite of anarchist, anarchy and anarchism!!! A struggle for anarchy and anarchism as opposed to all forms of marxism (state-socialism), liberalism and fascism, including populism. A struggle for a movement of the societal, i.e. economical and political/administrative, systems -- in libertarian direction, less authoritarian degree... AI/IFA and its sections always work and demonstrate with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, mass actions, and via elections. More information is available via Contact AI - Click here!.

Meanwhile the situation is increasingly more tense in Libya, and the international pressure against Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, and their totalitarian, fascist , extremist, system with severe violent ochlarchy, is also increasing.

US, Europe intensify efforts to isolate Gadhafi, Associated Press reported: The United States and European allies intensified efforts to isolate Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] on Monday, redoubling demands for him to step down, questioning his mental state and warning that those who stay loyal to him risk losing their wealth and being prosecuted for human rights abuses. Europe, which buys most of Libya's oil exports, outlined fresh sanctions to force the dictator to stop attacks on civilians and step down after 42 years of iron-fisted rule. The European Union issued travel bans and an asset freeze against senior Libyan officials, and ordered an arms embargo on the country. Germany proposed a 60-day economic embargo to prevent Gadhafi from using oil and other revenues to repress his people.

The EU has much more leverage over Libya than the United States since Europe buys 85 percent of Libyan oil exports and Gadhafi and his family are thought to have significant assets in Britain, Switzerland and Italy. Switzerland and Britain already have frozen Libyan assets. The travel and financial sanctions are aimed at peeling away loyalists from Gadhafi in the hope of further isolating him. "These sanctions and accountability mechanisms should make all members of the Libyan regime think about the choice they have before them: violate human rights and be held accountable or stop the violence and respect the Libyan people's call for change," US Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice told reporters following crisis meetings on Libya at the White House. "There's no escaping that critical choice."

As the Pentagon moved naval and air forces closer to Libya amid active international discussions about imposing a no-fly zone over the country, the US Treasury Department announced it had frozen at least $30 billion in Libyan assets since President Barack Obama imposed financial and travel sanctions on Gadhafi, his family, senior Libyan officials and the government last week. That figure is the largest amount of money ever frozen by a US sanctions order, which also set out travel bans for the Libyan leadership. Administration officials said that as long as the government continues its violent crackdown against opponents who now control most of eastern Libya, all options, including military ones, remain on the table. Speaking in Geneva to the UN Human Rights Council, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said the United States and European nations were exploring the idea of restricting airspace to prevent Gadhafi's government from bombing its citizens.

"Gadhafi has lost the legitimacy to govern, and it is time for him to go without further violence or delay," she said. "No option is off the table. That of course includes a no-fly zone." At the Pentagon, officials said they were moving forces in the region in case they were needed but did not say what they might be used for. "We have planners working various contingency plans and ... as part of that we are repositioning forces in the region to be able to provide options and flexibility," said Marine Col. Dave Lapan, a Defense Department spokesman. The US has a regular military presence in the Mediterranean Sea, two aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf area and a wide range of surveillance equipment available for use in the region. Without specific information about what assets were being moved and where, it was impossible to tell whether the US moves were intended as a military threat or were simply a symbolic show of force.

A flight ban seemed unlikely in the short term. Senior US officials said the issue was not discussed during Clinton's meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, whose country would have to support such a move if the US and its allies wanted authorization from the UN Security Council. Lavrov dismissed the idea in public remarks. Even before the EU announced the new sanctions, France pledged to send two planes with humanitarian aid to Libya's opposition stronghold of Benghazi after days of increasing concern about the hundreds, and potentially thousands, of deaths. After meetings with other nations' foreign policy chiefs in Geneva, Clinton said the US was sending two aid teams to help Libyan refugees. One would go to Egypt and the other to Tunisia to deal with the influx of fleeing Libyans. The US has pledged an initial $10 million to help refugees.

Gadhafi, meanwhile, in an interview with ABC News [also one with BBC, see above], dismissed the idea of leaving, rejected the allegations that he had ordered a crackdown on opponents and repeated his belief that the Libyan people love him, a claim that was met by derision in Washington. "It sounds, just frankly, delusional," Rice said. She said Gadhafi's behavior, including laughing on camera in television interviews amid the chaos, "underscores how unfit he is to lead and how disconnected he is from reality." "He should get out of his tent and see what's really happening in his country," said State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley, with a derisive nod to Gadhafi's favored living quarters.

Crowley said the US ambassador to Libya, Gene Cretz, who has been in Washington since early January for consultations, had been speaking to a broad range of Libyan opposition figures but declined to identify which ones. He also said the Libyan government had notified the administration that it had fired its ambassador to the United States, Ali Aujali, who last week joined the opposition, and had replaced him with a Gadhafi loyalist. The US closed its embassy in Tripoli on Friday after the remaining diplomats were evacuated but has not broken diplomatic relations with Libya. Last Monday, Aujali joined other Libyan diplomats in calling for Gadhafi to step down although he said he would not resign his post as ambassador.

Pro-Gadhafi forces fight rebels in 2 cities. International pressure on Moammar Gadhafi to end a crackdown on opponents escalated Monday as his loyalists fought rebels holding the two cities closest to the capital and his warplanes bombed an ammunition depot in the east. The US moved naval and air forces closer to Libya and said all options were open, including patrols of the North African nation's skies to protect its citizens from their ruler. France said it would fly aid to the opposition-controlled eastern half of the country. The European Union imposed an arms embargo and other sanctions, following the lead of the US and the UN The EU was also considering the creation of a no-fly zone over Libya. And the US and Europe were freezing billions in Libya's foreign assets.

[As mentioned above] "Gadhafi has lost the legitimacy to govern, and it is time for him to go without further violence or delay," US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said. "No option is off the table. That of course includes a no-fly zone," she added. British Prime Minister David Cameron told lawmakers: "We do not in any way rule out the use of military assets" to deal with Gadhafi's regime. Gadhafi, who in the past two weeks has launched the most brutal crackdown of any Arab regime facing a wave of popular uprisings, laughed off a question from ABC News about whether he would step down as the Obama administration demands. "My people love me. They would die for me," he said. ABC reported that Gadhafi invited the United Nations or any other organization to Libya on a fact-finding mission.

[As mentioned above] Gadhafi's remarks were met with derision in Washington. "It sounds, just frankly, delusional," said US Ambassador to the UN Susan Rice. She added that Gadhafi's behavior, including laughing on camera in TV interviews amid the chaos, "underscores how unfit he is to lead and how disconnected he is from reality." The turmoil in the oil-rich nation roiled markets for another day. Libya's oil chief said production had been cut by around 50 percent, denting supplies that go primarily to Europe. The country provides 2 percent of the world's oil, but concerns the unrest will spread to other oil-rich nations has sent oil prices rising worldwide.

The uprising that began Feb. 15 has posed the most serious challenge to Gadhafi in his more than four decades in power. His bloody crackdown has left hundreds, and perhaps thousands, dead. But clashes appear to have eased considerably in the past few days after planeloads of foreign journalists arrived in the capital at the government's invitation. The two sides are entrenched, and the direction the uprising takes next could depend on which can hold out longest. Gadhafi is dug in in Tripoli and nearby cities, backed by his elite security forces and militiamen who are generally better armed than the military. His opponents, holding the east and much of the country's oil infrastructure, also control pockets in western Libya near Tripoli. They are backed by mutinous army units, but those forces [the people more or less armed] appear to have limited supplies of ammunition and weapons.

Gadhafi opponents have moved to consolidate their hold in the east, centered on Benghazi - Libya's second- largest city, where the uprising began. Politicians there on Sunday set up their first leadership council to manage day-to-day affairs, taking a step toward forming what could be an alternative to Gadhafi's regime. The opposition is backed by numerous units of the military in the east that joined the uprising, and they hold several bases and Benghazi's airport. But so far, the units do not appear to have melded into a unified fighting force. Gadhafi long kept the military weak, fearing a challenge to his rule, so many units are plagued by shortages of supplies and ammunition.

On Monday, pro-Gadhafi forces retook control of the western border crossings with Tunisia that had fallen under opposition control and they bombed an ammunition depot in the rebel-held east, residents in the area said. The Libyan Defense Ministry denied the bombing. Regime forces also moved to tighten their ring around two opposition-controlled cities closest to the capital Tripoli - Zawiya and Misrata - where the two sides are locked in standoffs. An Associated Press reporter saw a large, pro-Gadhafi force massed on the western edge of Zawiya, some 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, with about a dozen armored vehicles along with tanks and jeeps mounted with anti-aircraft guns. An officer said they were from the elite Khamis Brigade, named after one of Gadhafi's sons who commands it. US diplomats have said the brigade is the best-equipped force in Libya.

A resident of Zawiya said by telephone that fighting started in the evening and intensified after sundown when troops loyal to Gadhafi attacked the city from the west and east. "We were able to repulse the attack. We damaged a tank with an RPG. The mercenaries fled after that," said the resident, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of government reprisals. He said Gadhafi called Zawiya's influential tribal leader Mohammed al-Maktouf and warned him that if the rebels don't leave the city's main square by early Tuesday, they will be hit by warplanes. "We are expecting a major battle," the resident said, added that the rebels killed eight soldiers and mercenaries Monday. Another resident of Zawiya said he heard gunfire well into the night on the outskirts of town.

In Misrata, Libya's third-largest city 125 miles (200 kilometers) east of Tripoli, pro-Gadhafi troops who control part of an air base on the outskirts tried to advance Monday. But they were repulsed by opposition forces, who included residents with automatic weapons and defected army units allied with them, one of the opposition fighters said. No casualties were reported and the fighter claimed that his side had captured eight soldiers, including a senior officer. The opposition controls most of the air base, and the fighter said dozens of anti-Gadhafi gunmen have arrived from farther east in recent days as reinforcements.

Several residents of the eastern city of Ajdabiya said Gadhafi's air force also bombed an ammunition depot nearby held by rebels. One resident, 17-year-old Abdel-Bari Zwei, reported intermittent explosions and a fire, and another, Faraj al-Maghrabi, said the facility was partially damaged. The site contains bombs, missiles and ammunition - key for the undersupplied opposition military forces. State TV carried a statement by Libya's Defense Ministry denying any attempt to bomb the depot. Ajdabiya is about 450 miles (750 kilometers) east of Tripoli along the Mediterranean coast.

Gadhafi supporters said they were in control of the city of Sabratha, west of Tripoli, which has seemed to go back and forth between the two camps in the past week. Several residents told the AP that protesters set fire to a police station, but then were dispersed. Anti-Gadhafi graffiti - "Down with the enemy of freedom" and "Libya is free, Gadhafi must leave" - were scrawled on some walls, but residents were painting them over. There were signs of economic distress in the country, with prices skyrocketing and long lines forming for bread and gasoline.

Global efforts to halt Gadhafi's crackdown [as mentioned] escalated Monday. In Washington, the Pentagon said it was moving some naval and air forces closer to Libya in case they are needed. The US has a regular military presence in the Mediterranean and farther to the south has two aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf area. The US Treasury Department said that at least $30 billion in Libyan assets have been frozen since President Barack Obama imposed sanctions on Libya last week.

France promised to send two planes with humanitarian aid the eastern opposition stronghold city of Benghazi, hoping to give it the momentum to oust Gadhafi. The aid to included medicine and doctors, would be the first direct Western help for the uprising that has taken control of the entire eastern half of Libya. French Prime Minister Francois Fillon said it was the start of a "massive operation of humanitarian support" for the east and that Paris was studying "all solutions" - including military options.

The EU slapped its own arms embargo, visa ban and other sanctions on Gadhafi's regime, following sanctions imposed by the US and the UN in the past week. And Europe was also considering the imposition of a no-fly zone over Libya to prevent any air attacks by the regime on rebellious citizens. Clinton met in Geneva with foreign ministers from Britain, France Germany and Italy to press for tough sanctions on the Libyan government.

Wolfowitz on Obama slowness. Former deputy secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz said he's been "mystified" at how the White House has handled the bloody crisis in Libya. "We've been just way too slow," Wolfowitz said in an interview airing Sunday 27.02.2011 on CNN's "Fareed Zakaria GPS." "And that slowness, we're going to pay a price for, for a long time." "Al Jazeera, which is no friend to the United States but which has become, with some justification, a hero of these revolutionary movements is taking the [situation] -- showing a picture of the White House or the president, [saying] why is the US being so silent?" he said. "Why is it being as silent as these people? And then it shows pictures of the people who have been killed in the protests. It's a devastating image."

The former Bush administration official, who also served as president of the World Bank, was asked if the US applying pressure to endangered leaders in the region would rattle countries such as Saudi Arabia and spread a message that Washington is angling for regime change. "I don't think that's a legitimate reason to stand by a man who's slaughtering his own people," Wolfowitz said. "And I have a lot of criticisms to make of the Saudis, but I don't believe they're capable of this sort of butchery."We'd be in a much better position to say, look, with all its faults, Saudi Arabia doesn't treat its subjects as trash," he continued. "It doesn't kill them, brutalize them, and threaten to take them back to the Stone Age. So let's put Saudi Arabia in one category. We'd be in a much better position to do that if we were clear about Gadhafi."

Of the Bush administration decision to normalize relations with Libya in return for the country giving up its weapons of mass destruction, Wolfowitz said the White House gave Gadhafi "a lot by, in effect, saying you won't suffer the fate of Saddam Hussein." "Some move was appropriate," he said of the restoration of relations. "I think we went too far. And I think the Obama administration continued that. "Al Jazeera is having great fun showing pictures of Hillary Clinton meeting with Mutassim Gadhafi who is, I don't know which of his sons is the most hideous, but this is the National Security Advisor, he's a pretty bad man," Wolfowitz said...

01.03.2011. Ad Libya Tuesday. RED ALERT - While the grass grows, the cow is dying! While international officials just talk about armed support, Gaddafi bombs and threatens with more bombing today. Armed international actions are urgently needed!! Send in arms! Airstrikes! Very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen!!! Tunisia, Iran, Oman, Yemen...

Ad. 'While international officials just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' 1. The US moved naval and air forces closer to Libya and said all options were open, including patrols of the North African nation's skies to protect its citizens from their ruler. 2. British Prime Minister David Cameron told lawmakers: "We do not in any way rule out the use of military assets". 3. Paris was studying "all solutions" - including military options. 4. Even a flight ban seemed unlikely in the short term. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, whose country would have to support such a move if the US and its allies wanted authorization from the UN Security Council... dismissed the idea in public remarks.

Ad. 'Gaddafi bombs and threatens with more bombing today of the Libyan people...' 1. Gaddafi called Zawiya's influential tribal leader Mohammed al-Maktouf and warned him that if the rebels don't leave the city's main square by early Tuesday, they will be hit by warplanes. 2. Several residents of the eastern city of Ajdabiya said Gaddafi's air force also bombed an ammunition depot nearby held by rebels. 3. On Monday, pro-Gaddafi forces retook control of the western border crossings with Tunisia that had fallen under opposition control and they bombed an ammunition depot in the rebel-held east, residents in the area said. 4. The opposition is backed by numerous units of the military. Gaddafi long kept the military weak, fearing a challenge to his rule, so many units are plagued by shortages of supplies and ammunition.

RED ALERT - The conclusion: Armed international support actions for the Libyan people are urgently needed!! Send in arms! Airstrikes! Very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen!!!

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared in a joint statement, to AIIS: Many Libyan people have been killed -- estimated to more than 2000 Monday, and more will probably follow, say, due to probable bombing/airstrikes today -- by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen. The situation in Libya is in reality genocide against the people, thousands murdered by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist, extremist, oligarchy with severe ochlarchy.

The situation in Libya is more and more similar to the more or less civil wars in the Balkan where the Serbian ruler and his henchmen were responsible for genocide. Now Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen in a similar way are responsible for genocide and rule of terror, i.e. terrorism, in Libya, against the Libyan people. Quite legitimate the Libyan people are claiming a development towards freedom & democracy and human rights - where Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist , extremist, oligarchy with severe violent ochlarchy, stand in the way...

In the Balkan more or less civil wars, the international anarchist movement (i.e. at that time IFA, see The official link-site of AI/IFA) via the AIIS/AIT was among the first to call for NATO airstrikes and bombing of the Serbian ruler and his henchmen, responsible for genocide - to stop this crime against humanity. The Americans and thus NATO waited far too long, but at last took relevant action against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen. This time we expect a more quick action, including direct actions, against the terror rule, i.e. terrorism, and genocide by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, murdering the Libyan people. While the grass grows, the cow is dying! This means RED ALERT and armed international actions very, very soon!!!

Send in arms! Ad Libyans saying 'we need help from outside' and similar; in addition to airstrikes and bombing of Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, the international community should supply the struggling Libyan people with arms. However several Libyans have said that they are not interested in regular ground forces from foreign powers... Furthermore, considering that a) more than 100,000 have fled Libya, and b) evacuations have sharply reduced the number of citizens from Western countries stranded in Libya, c) a problem with possible hostages taken by Gaddafi and his henchmen is practically solved, and it is now very, very soon time for international armed actions!

Airstrikes! It is very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, to avoid his probable tactic of using human shields, mixing with civilians in Tripoli, etc. Although this tactic may backfire somewhat due to too much spreading of his troops...

And take a look at Strategy and tactics, with links... especially the links! Remember: most of the members of The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections are de facto acting generals... all on equal footing - none above!! Thus listen to our advice!

We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days rather than a week!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!! As mentioned, it is very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, similar to the campaign against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen in the Balkan more or less civil wars. Gaddafi is very likely worse than the Serbian ruler!!!!

Libyan rebels celebrate win in battle near Tripoli, Associated Press reported: Residents of the rebel-held city closest to Libya's capital celebrated with a victory march Tuesday after repelling an overnight attack by Moammar Gadhafi's [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] forces. But troops loyal to the longtime leader clamped down on a strategic mountain town as they fought to reclaim areas near Tripoli, residents said. The rebels have been fighting to consolidate their gains as the international community weighs new moves to isolate the longtime Libyan leader, including the possibility of creating a no-fly zone over Libya. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton warned that Libya is at risk of collapsing into a "protracted civil war" amid increasingly violent clashes between the two sides.

Witnesses in Zawiya [a.k.a. Zawiyah] said pro-Gadhafi forces battled rebels for six hours overnight but could not retake control of the city 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli. They said the last of several assaults by the Gadhafi loyalists came at around 3 a.m. local time. "Allahu Akbar (God is Great) for our victory," residents of Zawiya chanted as they paraded through the city's main square. Some carried on their shoulders an air force colonel they said had just defected to the rebels' side. "We were worried about air raids but that did not happen," said one resident, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals.

The Zawiya rebels, who include mutinous army forces, are armed with tanks, machine guns and anti-aircraft guns. They fought back pro-Gadhafi troops, armed with the same weapons, who attacked from six directions. There was no word on casualties. "We will not give up Zawiya at any price," said one witness. "We know it is significant strategically. They will fight to get it, but we will not give up. We managed to defeat them because our spirits are high and their spirits are zero." The witnesses in Zawiya said youths from the city were stationed on the rooftops of high-rise buildings in the city to monitor the movements of the pro-Gadhafi forces and sound the warning if they thought an attack was imminent. They also spoke about generous offers of cash by the regime for the rebels to hand control of the city back to authorities.

Residents passed out sweets and cold drinks to fighters in Zawiya. Pro-Gadhafi forces also were repelled as they tried to retake two other opposition-held cities: Misrata, Libya's third-largest city 125 miles (200 kilometers) east of Tripoli, and Zintan, 75 miles (120 kilometers) south of the Libyan capital. Government loyalists, however, had recaptured the town of Gharyan in the Nafusa mountain range overlooking Tripoli and had set up checkpoints along the road connecting it and Zintan, the resident said, speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals. Protesters had control of the area until Friday, when a battalion appeared in the middle of the night, deploying tanks and troops.

"They were so quiet we were surprised. We thought they had joined the protesters," the witness said, adding that the resistance in the town was unarmed and easily outmaneuvered. The resident said the pro-Gadhafi forces had launched a manhunt with a list of wanted protesters. He said at least four officers had been detained for joining the protesters' side. Gadhafi supporters also have said they were in control of the city of Sabratha, west of Tripoli, which has seemed to go back and forth between the two camps in the past week. Since the revolt against Gadhafi's 41-year-old rule began two weeks ago, his regime has launched the harshest crackdown in the Arab world where authoritarian rulers are facing an unprecedented wave of uprisings. Gadhafi has already lost control of the eastern half of the country. He still holds the capital Tripoli and other nearby cities.

An exact death toll has been difficult to obtain in the chaos, but a medical committee in the eastern city of Benghazi, where the uprising began on Feb. 15, said at least 228 people had been killed, including 30 unidentified bodies, and 1,932 injured. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has cited reports that perhaps 1,000 have died amid the popular uprising and the government's violent crackdown on Gadhafi critics. [Diplomats have estimated the death toll to about 2000 in the last weekend of February.] More than 140,000 people also have fled Libya to Egypt and Tunisia in a growing exodus from the chaos engulfing the country, refugee officials said. UN refugee agency spokeswoman Melissa Fleming said Tuesday "the situation is reaching crisis point" at the Libya-Tunisia border where authorities say up to 75,000 people have fled Libya since Feb. 20. Egyptian authorities say 69,000 people have crossed over from Libya since Feb. 19.

International pressure to end the crackdown has escalated dramatically in the past few days. The US moved naval and air forces closer to Libya on Monday and said all options were open, including patrols of the North African nation's skies to protect its citizens from their ruler. The Obama administration is demanding that Gadhafi relinquish power immediately. "In the years ahead, Libya could become a peaceful democracy, or it could face protracted civil war. The stakes are high," Clinton told Congress in Washington. France said it would fly aid to the opposition-controlled eastern half of the country. The European Union imposed an arms embargo and other sanctions, following the lead of the US and the UN.

The EU and the US have also talked about the possibility of creating a no-fly zone over Libya. However, Russia's top diplomat ruled out the idea as "superfluous" and said world powers must instead focus on fully using the sanctions the UN Security Council approved over the weekend. Others suggested the tactic - used successfully in northern Iraq and Bosnia - to prevent Gadhafi from bombing his own people. But Russia's consent is required as a veto-wielding member of the Security Council. Susan Rice, the US ambassador to the United Nations, on Tuesday urged Gadhafi to consider exile, saying she's worried the African nation could plummet into a "humanitarian disaster." "It's important that he get off the stage," Rice said told CBS on "The Early Show." She said that exile "may be an option that he looks at." But the ambassador added that not even that scenario would inoculate Gadhafi from possible prosecution "for the crimes that he and those closest to him have committed."

In Misrata, pro-Gadhafi troops who control part of an air base on the city's outskirts tried to advance Monday. But they were repulsed by opposition forces, who included residents with automatic weapons and defected army units allied with them, one of the opposition fighters said. In Zintan, residents said an attack by pro-Gadhafi forces Monday night was the second since the city fell in rebel hands late last month. But, they added, Gadhafi's loyalists were bringing in reinforcements, possibly to stage a much bigger attack on the city. They said rebel forces also were in control of a nearby area known as the Arab Mountain Line that includes several towns that includes the small towns of Lanut, Kikla and Kabo.

In Zawiya, an Associated Press reporter saw a large, pro-Gadhafi force massed on the western edge of the city Monday night, with about a dozen armored vehicles along with tanks and jeeps mounted with anti-aircraft guns. An officer said they were from the elite Khamis Brigade, named after one of Gadhafi's sons who commands it. US diplomats have said the brigade is the best-equipped force in Libya. "We were able to repulse the attack. We damaged a tank with an RPG. The mercenaries fled after that," said a resident, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of government reprisals. He said Gadhafi called Zawiya's influential tribal leader Mohammed al-Maktouf and had warned him that if the rebels don't leave the city's main square by early Tuesday, they will be hit by warplanes.

Residents of Tripoli said the city was calm Tuesday but that some residents were anxious over what is seen there as a growing chance of foreign intervention. "People are worried about foreign intervention [probably meaning regular grouna troops]," said one resident who spoke on condition of anonymity because he feared reprisals. "Many Libyans see this as a conspiracy that will lead into dividing Libya to an eastern and western sectors. There will be massacres." On Tuesday, Gadhafi's regime sought to show that it was the country's only legitimate authority and that it continued to feel compassion for areas in the east that fell under the control of its opponents. A total of 18 trucks loaded with rice, wheat-flour, sugar and eggs left Tripoli for Benghazi, the country's second largest city 620 miles (1,000 kilometers) east of the capital. Also in the convoy were two refrigerated cars carrying medical supplies. The convoy was met with a small pro-Gadhafi demonstration as it made its way out of Tripoli. "God, Gadhafi, Libya and that's it," chanted the demonstrators. "The state is very generous with the people," said 22-year-old Ahmed Mahmoud as he watched the convoy.

In Benghazi, the epicenter of the opposition-controlled east, activists said they had no objection to the imposition of a no-fly zone over eastern Libya, but were divided whether to accept relief from the Gadhafi regime. "Gadhafi's air force is a serious threat to us," said lawyer Nasser Bin Nour. "We will welcome a no-fly zone on Gadhafi's warplanes over the whole of Libya. The only thing we object to is foreign troops on Libyan soil." said Bin Nour, who said many in the city would not oppose shelling the positions of pro-Gadhafi forces by foreign warships or planes. Another Benghazi activist, Najlaa al-Manqoush, echoed Bin Nour's comments on foreign aid, but pointed out that to accept the relief supplies sent Tuesday by the regime would help Gadhafi's propaganda machine. "We reject any attempt by the regime to beautify its image in the media," she said. "We are much smarter than that. We accept all the aid they send us from friendly nations, but not from Gadhafi."

UN suspends Libya from rights council. The full membership of the United Nations on Tuesday suspended Libya from the UN Human Rights Council in the latest international effort to isolate Moammar Gadhafi's government for its violent attacks on civilian protesters. The UN General Assembly voted by consensus on the council's own recommendation to suspend Libya's rights of council membership for committing "gross and systematic violations of human rights." The assembly also expressed "deep concern" about the human rights situation in Libya. The vote does not permanently remove Libya from the council, but prevents it from participation until the General Assembly determines whether to restore the country to full status.

The resolution was sponsored by Arab and African states. Venezuelan Ambassador Jorge Valero expressed reservations about the vote. "A decision such as this one could only take place after a genuine investigation," he said. US Ambassador Susan Rice said, "People who turn their guns on their own people have no place on the human rights council." "This is a harsh rebuke, but one that Libya's leaders have brought down upon themselves," she said. "It sends another clear warning to Mr. Gadhafi and those who stand by him: They most stop the killing." Gadhafi "has lost any legitimacy to rule," Rice said. "He must go, and he must go now."

Refugees swamp borders in fleeing Libyan unrest, France24 reported: Tunisian border officials are struggling to process crowds of Libyans and foreign migrant workers who are desperate to escape the unrest in Libya. Soldiers fired into the air on Tuesday in an effort to disperse a wave of would-be entrants. Soldiers fired into the air in an effort to subdue a wave of Egyptian labourers desperate to escape Libya on Tuesday, as the refugee crisis created by the rebellion against Muammar Gaddafi escalated. Aid workers threw bottles of water and loaves of bread over the wall to a sea of men surging forward towards the safety of Tunisian soil, in a futile attempt to calm them. Young Tunisians with branches torn from the trees kept them from clambering over the wall between border posts.

Tunisian officials were processing entrants as fast as they could, as medics plucked fainting men from the heaving mass sweeping over the chest-high steel gate. Panicking migrants passed their bulging suitcases, rugs, and blankets overhead at the gate where soldiers with sticks tried to hold them back. A Tunisian officer with a loud hailer shouted reassurances that they would be let in. Order looked close to collapse at one brief point in the overflowing border compound on the Tunisian side, where throngs of men jostled and long lines of exhausted migrants in torn jackets and headcloths queued for water, food, and toilets. Troops fired warning shots in the air and white-faced officers unholstered their automatic pistols.

Thousands yet to come. Many tens of thousands more are expected to flee west from the violence that has consumed Liby as Gaddafi's regime teeters on the verge of collapse. "We can't see beyond that building on the Libyan side but we think there are many more waiting to come through, " said Ayman Gharaibeh, team leader for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) at Ras Jdir. "The numbers are daunting," he said. The last couple of days had seen an upsurge and refugees were now crossing at a rate of up to 15,000 a day, he said. There was no one to coordinate relief and establish order on the Libyan side and the UNHCR judged it was not safe to go over there. Medecins sans Frontieres and the Red Cross-Red Crescent were trying to liaise with the Libyans to slow the flow. "It looks like it's going to get worse ... They are going to break down the wall in the end," said Gharaibeh grimly. In the mass of people behind the wall on the Libyan side, Bangladeshis held up a sheet with the words: "Help Help Help." In the Tunisian compound, a few hundred Vietnamese squatted stoically, waiting their turn to be bussed out and home.

Planes and ships needed. About 70,000 refugees had entered Tunisia since the uprising began in Libya and only an estimated 20 percent had been repatriated, the UNHCR team-leader said. Tunisia's capacity to feed, shelter and provide sanitation for the destitute workers is being pushed to breaking point. The UN agency built a transit camp of hundreds of white tents overnight about 7 km (4 miles) back from the border, with the capacity to provide temporary relief for up to 20,000. "When are we going to be taken out of here? We cannot accept this," said one Egyptian. "Give me a camel. I will take a camel. I just want to go home." Evacuation flights were picking up refugees from Djerba airport in the plush beach resort area in the north of Tunisia, a world away from the chaos. Ships have taken boatloads away from the port of Zarzis but not nearly fast enough to ease the pressure, said Tunisian army Colonel Mohamed Essoussi.

"We need the most rapid possible evacuation," he said. "The major weaknesses are in transport, air and maritime transport." The emergency shelters and transit camp could handle 5,000 a day, he said. "We are now feeding 17,000 people." International aid agencies at the scene agreed with the assessment. Tunisia's capacity to shelter the flow was at its limit. They said faster evacuation was needed and control on the Libyan side would greatly ease the crisis. However, there appeared to be almost no one with the power and authority to achieve order there, the UNHCR said. Thousands have no money to pay for their passage home, and no employer responsible for their repatriation. Many have been sleeping out in the open for days in cold, wet conditions. As the sun went down and rain clouds approached, campfires flickered under a grove of trees at the border, where hundreds of refugees huddled in shelters built of their baggage, under blankets and plastic sheeting.

US warns of civil war in Libya unless Gaddafi goes, Reuters reported: Libya could descend into civil war unless Muammar Gaddafi quits, the United States said on Tuesday, its demand for his departure intensifying pressure on the longtime leader after news of Western military preparations. Gaddafi remained defiant, dispatching forces to a western border area amid fears that the most violent Arab revolt may grow bloodier and cause a humanitarian crisis. Tunsian border guards fired into the air on Tuesday to try to control a crowd of people clamoring to cross the frontier and escape the violence. About 70,000 people have passed through the Ras Jdir border post in the past two weeks, and many more of the hundreds of thousands of foreign workers in Libya are expected to follow.

Gaddafi's son Saif al-Islam warned the West against launching any military action to topple Gaddafi, and said the veteran ruler would not step down or go into exile. "Using force against Libya is not acceptable. There's no reason, but if they want...we are ready, we are not afraid," he told Sky television, adding: "We live here, we die here." Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told US lawmakers: "Libya could become a peaceful democracy or it could face protracted civil war." She said the Obama administration would look into allegations that Gaddafi personally ordered the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, because of new statements by defecting Libyan officials "making it clear that the order came from the very top." The United States said it was moving ships and planes closer to the oil-producing North African state. The destroyer USS Barry moved through the Suez Canal on Monday and into the Mediterranean. Two amphibious assault ships, the USS Kearsarge, which can carry 2,000 Marines, and the USS Ponce, are in the Red Sea and are expected to go through the canal early on Wednesday.

US RULES NOTHING OUT. The White House said the ships were being redeployed in preparation for possible humanitarian efforts but stressed it "was not taking any options off the table." "We are looking at a lot of options and contingencies. No decisions have been made on any other actions," Defense Secretary Robert Gates said. French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe sounded a note of caution, saying military intervention would not happen without a clear United Nations mandate. British Prime Minister David Cameron said it was unacceptable that "Colonel Gaddafi can be murdering his own people using airplanes and helicopter gunships." General James Mattis, commander of US Central Command, told a Senate hearing that imposing a no-fly zone would be a "challenging" operation that would mean actual attack. "You would have to remove air defense capability in order to establish a no-fly zone, so no illusions here," he said. "It would be a military operation -- it wouldn't be just telling people not to fly airplanes."

Analysts said Western leaders were in no mood to rush into conflict after the troubled, drawn-out involvements in Afghanistan and Iraq. "They will be desperate not to place themselves in that situation, unless not doing so would result in even worse massacres," said Shashank Joshi of London's Royal United Services Institute. Suspicions grew that Gaddafi, a survivor of past coup attempts, did not grasp the scale of the forces against him. [As mentioned] "All my people love me," he told the ABC network and the BBC on Monday, dismissing the significance of a rebellion that has ended his control over much of oil-rich eastern Libya.

REBELS CLAIM STRENGTH GROWING. Rebel fighters claimed the balance of the conflict was swinging their way. "Our strength is growing and we are getting more weapons. We are attacking checkpoints," said Yousef Shagan, a spokesman in Zawiyah, only 50 km (30 miles) from Tripoli. A rebel army officer in the eastern city of Ajdabiyah said rebel units were becoming more organised. "All the military councils of Free Libya are meeting to form a unified military council to plan an attack on Gaddafi security units, militias and mercenaries," Captain Faris Zwei said. He said there were more than 10,000 volunteers in the city, plus defecting soldiers.

Rebels guarding a munitions store said they feared a direct hit by Gaddafi's warplanes could cause destruction for miles around. But Zwei said pilots appeared to be aiming to miss. "We have complete confidence in the Libyan air force not to hit anything that affects their relatives in the east," he said. Despite the widespread collapse of Gaddafi's writ, his forces were fighting back in some regions. A reporter on the Tunisian border saw Libyan troops reassert control at a crossing abandoned on Monday, and residents of Nalut, about 60 km (35 miles) from the border, said they feared pro-Gaddafi forces were planning to recapture the town. Mohamed, a resident of rebel-held Misrata, told Reuters by phone: "Symbols of Gaddafi's regime have been swept away from the city. Only a (pro-Gaddafi) battalion remains at the city's air base but they appear to be willing to negotiate safe exit out of the air base. We are not sure if this is genuine or just a trick to attack the city again." Across the country, tribal leaders, officials, military officers and army units have defected to the rebels. Sanctions will squeeze his access to funds.

BREAD QUEUES. Tripoli is a clear Gaddafi stronghold, but even in the capital, loyalties are divided. Many on the streets on Tuesday expressed loyalty but a man who described himself as a military pilot said: "One hundred percent of Libyans don't like him." There were queues outside bread shops on Tuesday morning. Some residents said many shops were limiting the number of loaves customers could buy.... National Oil Corporation said output had halved because of the departure of foreign workers. Brent crude prices surged above $116 a barrel as supply disruptions and the potential for more unrest in the Middle East and North Africa kept investors on edge.

Meanwhile in Tunisia - Struggling unity govt hit by new resignations, France24 reported: Local development minister Nejib Chebbi, founder of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party, and minister of higher education Ahmed Ibrahim became the latest figures to resign from Tunisia's struggling unity government on Tuesday. Two more ministers left Tunisia's interim government Tuesday following the resignations of the prime minister and two other ministers after weeks of protests about the caretaker authority. Higher education and scientific research minister Ahmed Ibrahim, head of Ettajdid party, told AFP that he had resigned believing he "could better serve the revolution by being outside of the government". "The Ettajdid movement will have full freedom to act to contribute to the democratic transition," he said.

Local development minister Ahmed Nejib Chebbi, from the Progressive Democratic Party, announced his departure at a press conference criticising the "hesitation and fuzziness" of the interim authority. The interim government was appointed after the fall of president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali on January 14, after weeks of demonstrations and a security force crackdown that left about 200 people dead. It included several members of Ben Ali's regime, and protests continued to demand they also leave.

Mohammed Ghannouchi, prime minister in the interim government and for Ben Ali, quit on Sunday after clashes at weekend demonstrations left five [NB! updated figure] people dead. "I am not ready to be the person who takes decisions that would end up causing casualties," Ghannouchi said, announcing his decision to resign after just over six weeks as interim prime minister. He was swiftly replaced as prime minister by 84-year-old Beji Caid Essebsi, a minister under independent Tunisia's founding president Habib Bourguiba. Industry and technology minister Mohamed Afif Chelbi and planification and international cooperation minister Mohamed Nouri Jouini, who were both also in Ben Ali's regime, resigned on Monday.

In Iran police fired tear gas to disperse protesters, see The situation in Iran - IJA 2 (39).

Omani troops fired in the air, wounding one person, when they moved in to disperse protesters at the northern port of Sohar, witnesses said.

Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh chastised Washington for its criticism of Arab leaders' responses to regional unrest.

02.03.2011. Ad Libya Wednesday. STILL RED ALERT! Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying! World leaders still just talk about armed support, while the Libyan people ask for airstrikes, and Gaddafi continues the genocide. Armed international actions are urgently needed!! Send in arms! Airstrikes! Still very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen!!!

Monday 28.01.2011 the strategic picture was the following:

1. Ad. 'While international officials just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' 1. The US moved naval and air forces closer to Libya and said all options were open, including patrols of the North African nation's skies to protect its citizens from their ruler. 2. British Prime Minister David Cameron told lawmakers: "We do not in any way rule out the use of military assets". 3. Paris was studying "all solutions" - including military options. 4. Even a flight ban seemed unlikely in the short term. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, whose country would have to support such a move if the US and its allies wanted authorization from the UN Security Council... dismissed the idea in public remarks.

2. Ad. 'Gaddafi bombs and threatens with more bombing today of the Libyan people...' 1. Gaddafi called Zawiya's influential tribal leader Mohammed al-Maktouf and warned him that if the rebels don't leave the city's main square by early Tuesday, they will be hit by warplanes. 2. Several residents of the eastern city of Ajdabiya said Gaddafi's air force also bombed an ammunition depot nearby held by rebels. 3. On Monday, pro-Gaddafi forces retook control of the western border crossings with Tunisia that had fallen under opposition control and they bombed an ammunition depot in the rebel-held east, residents in the area said. 4. The opposition is backed by numerous units of the military. Gaddafi long kept the military weak, fearing a challenge to his rule, so many units are plagued by shortages of supplies and ammunition.

Tuesday 01.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following. NB! Gaddafi did not bomb any of the Libyan people with airstrikes, as suggested on Monday. But he still probably may do it!

3. Ad. 'World leaders still just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' The EU and the US have talked about the possibility of creating a no-fly zone over Libya. However, Russia's top diplomat ruled out the idea as "superfluous" and said world powers must instead focus on fully using the sanctions the UN Security Council approved over the weekend. [IIFOR's strategical experts said to AIIS that sanctions at best work in the long run, and are in no way sufficient to stop the genocide!] Others suggested the tactic - used successfully in northern Iraq and Bosnia - to prevent Gaddafi from bombing his own people. [IIFOR said to AIIS that this is compatible with the advice of AISC and the AI/IFA.] But Russia's consent is required as a veto-wielding member of the Security Council.

The White House said [war] ships were being redeployed in preparation for possible humanitarian efforts but stressed it "was not taking any options off the table." "We are looking at a lot of options and contingencies. No decisions have been made on any other actions," Defense Secretary Robert Gates said. French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe sounded a note of caution, saying military intervention would not happen without a clear United Nations mandate. British Prime Minister David Cameron said it was unacceptable that "Colonel Gaddafi can be murdering his own people using airplanes and helicopter gunships." General James Mattis, commander of US Central Command, told a Senate hearing that imposing a no-fly zone would be a "challenging" operation that would mean actual attack. "You would have to remove air defense capability in order to establish a no-fly zone, so no illusions here," he said. "It would be a military operation -- it wouldn't be just telling people not to fly airplanes."

Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying!

4. Ad. 'The Libyan people ask for airstrikes...' Several of the Libyan people have agreed on the following: Gaddafi's air force is a serious threat to us. We will welcome a no-fly zone on Gaddafi's warplanes over the whole of Libya. The only thing we object to is foreign troops on Libyan soil. Many would not oppose shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign warships or planes!

Wednesday 02.03.2011 the strategic picture is the following. The need for more arms to the Libyan people is about the same as Monday and Tuesday, i.e. urgent. The Libyan people are not opposed to shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign planes. The Libyan people object to foreign [regular ground] troops on Libyan soil.

Thus: STILL RED ALERT - The conclusion: Armed international support actions for the Libyan people are urgently needed!! Send in arms! Airstrikes! Still very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen!!!

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared in a joint statement, to AIIS: Many Libyan people have been killed -- estimated to more than 2000 Monday, more Tuesday -- and even more will probably follow, say, due to probable bombing/airstrikes -- by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen. The situation in Libya is in reality genocide against the people, thousands murdered by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist, extremist, oligarchy with severe ochlarchy.

The situation in Libya is more and more similar to the more or less civil wars in the Balkan where the Serbian ruler and his henchmen were responsible for genocide. Now Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen in a similar way are responsible for genocide and rule of terror, i.e. terrorism, in Libya, against the Libyan people. Quite legitimate the Libyan people are claiming a development towards freedom & democracy and human rights - where Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist , extremist, oligarchy with severe violent ochlarchy, stand in the way...

In the Balkan more or less civil wars, the international anarchist movement (i.e. at that time IFA, see The official link-site of AI/IFA) via the AIIS/AIT was among the first to call for NATO airstrikes and bombing of the Serbian ruler and his henchmen, responsible for genocide - to stop this crime against humanity. The Americans and thus NATO waited far too long, but at last took relevant action against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen. This time we expect a more quick action, including direct actions, against the terror rule, i.e. terrorism, and genocide by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, murdering the Libyan people. Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying! This means RED ALERT and armed international actions very, very soon!!!

Send in arms! Ad Libyans saying a) 'we are not opposed to shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign planes', and b) 'we need help from outside' and similar; in addition to airstrikes and bombing of Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, the international community should supply the struggling Libyan people with arms. However several Libyans have said that they are not interested in regular ground forces from foreign powers... A problem with possible hostages taken by Gaddafi and his henchmen is practically solved, and it is now very, very soon time for international armed actions!

Airstrikes! It is very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, to avoid his probable tactic of using human shields, mixing with civilians in Tripoli, etc. Although this tactic may backfire somewhat due to too much spreading of his troops...

And take a look at Strategy and tactics, with links... especially the links! Remember: most of the members of The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections are de facto acting generals... all on equal footing - none above!! Thus listen to our advice!

We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days rather than a week!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!! As mentioned, it is very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, similar to the campaign against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen in the Balkan more or less civil wars. Gaddafi is very likely worse than the Serbian ruler!!!!

Rebels fend off attack by Gaddafi forces in east Libya, France 24 reported: Anti-regime forces fended off an attack by troops loyal to Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in the eastern town of Brega after a series of battles on Wednesday. Gaddafi forces launched an attack on the rebels at dawn. Libyan rebels fought intense battles to repel Moamer Kadhafi's forces from the key eastern oil port of Brega Wednesday as the regime's biggest counter-offensive yet left at least 10 people dead. Opposition fighters said they had finally pushed Kadhafi's men out of the town on the Mediterranean coast after a day of chaotic clashes, even as a government fighter jet fired two missiles near their victory celebrations."Brega is liberated. We have forced them to 30 kilometres (22 miles) west," rebel fighter Khalid al-Aqoly told AFP.

Kadhafi's [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] forces, backed by tanks and heavy weaponry, had attacked at dawn and quickly seized the airport, an oil terminal and a university in Brega, the westernmost town held by the poorly armed Libyan opposition. While Kadhafi appeared on television to deny there was any opposition to his 41-year rule, the advantage in Brega went back and forth but by the evening the rebels said they had prevailed. However moments after dozens of men had gathered in a square near the university, flashing victory signs and firing into the air, a fighter jet launched two missiles at them, an AFP reporter witnessed. The attack caused no casualties but gouged out two craters in a street 15 to 20 metres (yards) away.

Rebels chanting "Allahu Akhbar" (God is greatest) ducked for cover and then started firing machine guns at the jet, which streaked low in the sky. Claiming victory several hours earlier, rebel leaders in the main eastern town of Benghazi said at least 10 people were dead."They tried to claim Brega, they ended up with a failure. We kicked them out, the battle is done," said Mustafa Gheriani, the media organiser for the rebels at their headquarters in Benghazi."We heard numbers of 10 to 15 martyrs but we are still surveying."

Another huge blast believed to be from an airstrike had rocked the town earlier as rebels surrounded regime fighters who were in the university area and at the gates of the Sirte oil company. Smoke rose from shell fire and heavy machine gun fire rattled through Brega."Now they're limited to the university and the gates of the oil company. Their ammunition is running out. They're firing randomly. We'll take these positions by nightfall," said one rebel fighter who gave his name as Mohammad. An AFP reporter at one of the two hospitals in Brega, which is 200 kilometres (125 miles) southwest of the rebels' headquarters in Benghazi, saw the bloodied bodies of four young men in a morgue. Rebel volunteer Mashallah Aqub said: "There are four more bodies in another morgue and at another hospital and other bodies we haven't been able to collect yet."

Anti-regime forces have seized most of the east of the country since the uprising began on February 15 and have taken tentative steps towards setting up a parallel government. But the opposition forces, mostly comprising military defectors and volunteers, have been watching warily for a fightback. Oil company official Ahmed Ali said the sound of gunfire had woken him early on Wednesday at his firm's compound. "I saw mercenaries from Chad who had taken up position at the company gates. I left in a car with a colleague. They stopped the car to search us for weapons before letting us go," Ali said.

Meanwhile Kadhafi's forces also launched an airstrike in Ajdabiya, 40 kilometres from Brega, witnesses said. One witness said the airstrikes had targeted a weapons dump that was also hit two days ago, but residents said it had hit a former army base near the town. There were no casualties, they said. Kadhafi has lost most of the east of the oil-rich North African country but remains entrenched in the capital Tripoli in the west... IIFOR said to AIIS that it was most likely pure luck that the airstrikes did not kill some of the people.

According to Euronews, rebel fighters disputed the claims by Gaddafi loyalists that they advanced on Brega without using force. "Around 100 cars carrying mercenaries arrived. They came to kill and they had heavy weapons such as rocket launchers and machine guns" one eyewitness told Euronews. Over the past two weeks, Gaddafi's regime has lost control over swathes of Libya's territory. The rebels have seized large parts of the east, although Gaddafi retains a tight grip on the capital, Tripoli. His forces also hold the Libyan leader's hometown of Sirte, as well as Gharyan and Sabratha in the country's northwest. The rebel National Libyan Council told the Reuters news agency its forces will push westwards if Gaddafi refuses to step down.

In the opposition bastion of Benghazi, the rebel National Libyan Council called for UN-backed air strikes on African mercenaries it said Gaddafi was using against his own people. "We call for specific attacks on strongholds of these mercenaries," said council spokesman Hafiz Ghoga. "The presence of any foreign forces on Libyan soil is strongly opposed. There is a big difference between this and strategic air strikes." In a possible response to Western hints that the opposition needs to unify to facilitate rebel links with outside powers, Ghoga added that a former justice minister, Mustafa Abdel Jalil, would be chairman of the Council which will have 30 members and be based in Benghazi before moving later to Tripoli.

Any sort of foreign military involvement in Arab countries is a sensitive topic for Western nations uncomfortably aware that Iraq suffered years of bloodletting and al Qaeda violence after a 2003 US-led invasion toppled Saddam Hussein. The Libyan leader might do something "desperate" to defend his regime, Italy's industry minister said. IIFOR said to AIIS that there is a danger that Gaddafi may use dirty bombs based on his significant stock of mustard gas, i.e. chemical warfare! A Tripoli resident and Gaddafi opponent, who did not want to be identified, told Reuters afterwards: "Gaddafi will hang on for a while. It's not going to be easy for an unarmed crowd to face highly armed forces eager to shoot their own people." IIFOR said to AIIS that sending in arms from the international community, to the opposition forces, now is more and more urgent.

Death toll now at 6000. NRK in the evening reports that the death toll now stands at 6000 people, based on sources of a Libyan human rights organization. Also according to BBC, the rebel National Libyan Council now supports airstrikes by international forces, compatible with the advice of the AISC and the AI/IFA, but as many other Libyans and the AISC and the AI/IFA, they don't want foreign regular ground troops in the country. They fear a similar situation in Libya as in Iraq and Afghanistan, AIIS reports.

When Muammar Gaddafi launched the failing land and air offensive to retake territory in Libya's east at dawn on Wednesday (sparking a rebel call for foreign air strikes), the veteran ruler twinned the attack with a fiery propaganda broadside against the rebels, playing on both nationalist opinion and Western jitters by saying much blood would be shed in "another Vietnam" if foreign powers intervened in the crisis. "We will enter a bloody war and thousands and thousands of Libyans will die if the United States enters or NATO enters," Gaddafi told Tripoli supporters at a gathering televised live. "We are ready to hand out weapons to a million, or 2 million or 3 million, and another Vietnam will begin. It doesn't matter to us. We no longer care about anything."

IIFOR commented to AIIS that Gaddafi is trying the old trick of Sun Tzu: "Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak." Gaddafi here appears strong, but is weak. But he can still make a lot of deadly chaos, airstrikes directed at the people and perhaps even using mustard gas in dirty bombs against crowds...

On the battlefield, government troops as mentioned briefly captured Brega, an oil export terminal, before being driven back by rebels who have held the town 800 km (500 miles) east of Tripoli for about a week, rebel officers said, adding they were ready to move westwards against Gaddafi's forces if he refused to quit. As mentioned further bombing raids near the oil terminals were carried out in the afternoon. Estimates of the death toll during the day ranged between five and 14. There has been talk among the international community of the possibility of imposing a no-fly zone over Libya, but on Wednesday US Defence Secretary Robert Gates said such a move would first require an attack to cripple Libyan air defences. "One of our biggest concerns is Libya descending into chaos and becoming a giant Somalia," Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told US lawmakers.

Gaddafi, who once said ballot box democracy was for donkeys, told the gathering in Tripoli the world did not understand he had given power to the people long ago. "We put our fingers in the eyes of those who doubt that Libya is ruled by anyone other than its people," he said, referring to his system of "direct democracy" launched at a meeting attended by visiting Cuban leader Fidel Castro in 1977. IIFOR commented to AIIS that this is a lie, there is no direct democracy in Libya, but only direct ruling by the dictator Gaddafi, who falsely most likely assumes that he and the Libyan people are "one".

Referring to an unprecedented two-week-old popular uprising against his rule, Gaddafi also called for the United Nations and NATO to probe what had happened in Libya, and said he saw a conspiracy to colonise Libya and seize its oil. [Sources: Euronews & Reuters and AIIS.]

03.03.2011. Ad Libya Thursday. NB! D-day in the weekend? World leaders talk about armed support on overtime! The Libyan people ask for airstrikes! Gaddafi continues the genocide! Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying! Armed international actions are urgently needed!! Send in arms! Airstrikes! Still very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen!!! STILL RED ALERT! - And Egypt...

Monday 28.01.2011 the strategic picture was the following:

1. Ad. 'While international officials just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' 1. The US moved naval and air forces closer to Libya and said all options were open, including patrols of the North African nation's skies to protect its citizens from their ruler. 2. British Prime Minister David Cameron told lawmakers: "We do not in any way rule out the use of military assets". 3. Paris was studying "all solutions" - including military options. 4. Even a flight ban seemed unlikely in the short term. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, whose country would have to support such a move if the US and its allies wanted authorization from the UN Security Council... dismissed the idea in public remarks.

2. Ad. 'Gaddafi bombs and threatens with more bombing today of the Libyan people...' 1. Gaddafi called Zawiya's influential tribal leader Mohammed al-Maktouf and warned him that if the rebels don't leave the city's main square by early Tuesday, they will be hit by warplanes. 2. Several residents of the eastern city of Ajdabiya said Gaddafi's air force also bombed an ammunition depot nearby held by rebels. 3. On Monday, pro-Gaddafi forces retook control of the western border crossings with Tunisia that had fallen under opposition control and they bombed an ammunition depot in the rebel-held east, residents in the area said. 4. The opposition is backed by numerous units of the military. Gaddafi long kept the military weak, fearing a challenge to his rule, so many units are plagued by shortages of supplies and ammunition.

Tuesday 01.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following. NB! Gaddafi did not bomb any of the Libyan people with airstrikes, as suggested on Monday. But he still probably may do it!

3. Ad. 'World leaders still just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' The EU and the US have talked about the possibility of creating a no-fly zone over Libya. However, Russia's top diplomat ruled out the idea as "superfluous" and said world powers must instead focus on fully using the sanctions the UN Security Council approved over the weekend. [IIFOR's strategical experts said to AIIS that sanctions at best work in the long run, and are in no way sufficient to stop the genocide!] Others suggested the tactic - used successfully in northern Iraq and Bosnia - to prevent Gaddafi from bombing his own people. [IIFOR said to AIIS that this is compatible with the advice of AISC and the AI/IFA.] But Russia's consent is required as a veto-wielding member of the Security Council.

The White House said [war] ships were being redeployed in preparation for possible humanitarian efforts but stressed it "was not taking any options off the table." "We are looking at a lot of options and contingencies. No decisions have been made on any other actions," Defense Secretary Robert Gates said. French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe sounded a note of caution, saying military intervention would not happen without a clear United Nations mandate. British Prime Minister David Cameron said it was unacceptable that "Colonel Gaddafi can be murdering his own people using airplanes and helicopter gunships." General James Mattis, commander of US Central Command, told a Senate hearing that imposing a no-fly zone would be a "challenging" operation that would mean actual attack. "You would have to remove air defense capability in order to establish a no-fly zone, so no illusions here," he said. "It would be a military operation -- it wouldn't be just telling people not to fly airplanes."

Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying!

4. Ad. 'The Libyan people ask for airstrikes...' Several of the Libyan people have agreed on the following: Gaddafi's air force is a serious threat to us. We will welcome a no-fly zone on Gaddafi's warplanes over the whole of Libya. The only thing we object to is foreign troops on Libyan soil. Many would not oppose shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign warships or planes!

5. Wednesday 02.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following. In the morning the need for more arms to the Libyan people is about the same as Monday and Tuesday, i.e. urgent. The Libyan people are not opposed to shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign planes. The Libyan people object to foreign [regular ground] troops on Libyan soil. NB! Gaddafi did bomb the Libyan people with airstrikes, but most likely with no fatalities - so far! There may be more -- and more deadly -- later on, i.e. if his airforce is not bombed by internationals, very, very soon!!

Death toll updated to 6000 people according to NRK! More Libyan people including the rebel National Libyan Council ask for airstrikes by international forces! The National Libyan Council also told its forces will push westwards if Gaddafi refuses to step down. Thus, the need for more arms to the Libyan people is more an more urgent. See also the report of 02.03.2011.

* Thursday 03.03.2011 the strategic picture is the following: About the same as Wednesday. But the battle of Tripoli may happen in the weekend, i.e. D-day! Both the need for more arms and airstrikes by international forces are thus more and more urgent, but regular foreign ground forces are ruled out. World leaders talk about armed support on overtime! In this connection the following words of wisdom of Sun Tzu, and the Art of War, may be mentioned:

1. "One may know how to conquer without being able to do it."
2. "There is no instance of a country having benefited from prolonged warfare."
3. "In war, then, let your great object be victory, not lengthy campaigns."
4. "Invincibility lies in the defence; the possibility of victory in the attack."


And... "If words of advice are not clear and distinct, and if they are not thoroughly understood, then the generals are to blame. But, if words of advice are clear and nothing happens, then it is the fault of the world's main leaders!" said General H. Mann of the
AISC to AIIS.
"The advice from the AISC and the AI/IFA, to the world leaders, seems to be clear enough, and should be thoroughly understood..." IIFOR said to AIIS.

Thus: STILL RED ALERT - The conclusion: Armed international support actions for the Libyan people are urgently needed!! Send in arms! Airstrikes! Still very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen!!!

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared in a joint statement, to AIIS: Many Libyan people have been killed -- estimated to about 6000 Wednesday -- and even more will probably follow, say, due to probable bombing/airstrikes, and even may be use of mustard gas -- by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen. The situation in Libya is in reality genocide against the people, thousands murdered by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist, extremist, oligarchy with severe ochlarchy.

The situation in Libya is more and more similar to the more or less civil wars in the Balkan where the Serbian ruler and his henchmen were responsible for genocide. Now Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen in a similar way are responsible for genocide and rule of terror, i.e. terrorism, in Libya, against the Libyan people. Quite legitimate the Libyan people are claiming a development towards freedom & democracy and human rights - where Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist , extremist, oligarchy with severe violent ochlarchy, stand in the way...

In the Balkan more or less civil wars, the international anarchist movement (i.e. at that time IFA, see The official link-site of AI/IFA) via the AIIS/AIT was among the first to call for NATO airstrikes and bombing of the Serbian ruler and his henchmen, responsible for genocide - to stop this crime against humanity. The Americans and thus NATO waited far too long, but at last took relevant action against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen. This time we expect a more quick action, including direct actions, against the terror rule, i.e. terrorism, and genocide by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, murdering the Libyan people. Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying! World leaders talk about armed support on overtime! This means RED ALERT and armed international actions very, very soon!!!

Send in arms! Ad Libyans saying a) 'we are for shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign planes', and b) 'we need help from outside' and similar; in addition to airstrikes and bombing of Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, the international community should supply the struggling Libyan people with arms. However many Libyans have said that they are not interested in regular ground forces from foreign powers... A problem with possible hostages taken by Gaddafi and his henchmen is practically solved, and it is now very, very soon time for international armed actions!

Airstrikes! It is very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, to avoid his probable tactic of using human shields, mixing with civilians in Tripoli, etc. Although this tactic may backfire somewhat due to too much spreading of his troops...

And take a look at Strategy and tactics, with links... especially the links! Remember: most of the members of The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections are de facto acting generals... all on equal footing - none above!! Thus listen to our advice!

We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within a few days!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!! As mentioned, it is very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, similar to the campaign against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen in the Balkan more or less civil wars. Gaddafi is very likely worse than the Serbian ruler!!!!

Rebels reinforce key Libyan oil port in east, Associated Press reported: Rebels reinforced a key oil port Thursday while facing new regime airstrikes in eastern Libya, and thousands of angry mourners buried victims of a counteroffensive by Moammar Gadhafi's [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] forces, shooting guns in the air, shouting "Down with Gadhafi!" and swearing to take vengeance. Although there have been stirrings of a diplomatic effort to ease the crisis, an opposition spokesman flatly ruled out any negotiations with Gadhafi, saying "his hands are tainted with blood." Signaling he was digging in, Gadhafi's regime apparently has stepped up its recruitment of mercenaries from other African countries, with an official in neighboring Mali saying that 200-300 men have left for Libya in the last week...

Army units that have joined the rebels fanned out in the oil facilities and port at Brega, armed with machine guns and rocket-propelled grenade launchers and dressed in camouflage army uniforms with checkered keffiyehs. They were backed by at least a dozen pickup trucks with mounted machine guns or towing rocket launchers. Government warplanes launched a new airstrike on the town Thursday morning, according to witnesses. It was not clear what they targeted, but it was likely an airstrip of the huge oil complex on the Mediterranean coast. No casualties were reported, and pro-Gadhafi forces withdrew 80 miles (130 kilometers) to the west to another oil port, Ras Lanouf, after their defeat Wednesday by citizen militias from nearby towns and cities.

Despite having little central organization or command, the anti-Gadhafi fighters were able to repel a force of several hundred regime troops that attacked after dawn. "We are in a position to control the area and we are deploying our forces," a rebel officer in Brega told the Associated Press, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the media. At least 14 rebel fighters were killed in Wednesday's battle, including Abdul-Salaam Senoussi, whose father, Mohammed, came to Brega to claim his body. "You know, this is my son," the grieving father said softly after identifying the body. He made a gesture like a pistol and said: "They shot him by plane."

Gadhafi has come under international criticism for firing at his people from warplanes, although his regime denies it. Also among the dead was 7-year-old Hassan Umran, who was killed when he was caught in the crossfire. His body was at the same Brega morgue as Senoussi's son. In the opposition stronghold of Benghazi, 140 miles (220 kilometers) northeast of Brega, thousands of mourners chanted "Down with Gadhafi" and fired weapons into the air as they buried three of the dead. "Our message to Gadhafi is we are coming and we will make Libya free," said one man in the crowd, Sami Mosur. "We will kill him, like he has killed our people here."

The fighting at Brega halted for now the regime's first counteroffensive on the opposition-held eastern half of the country. It also underlined the deadlock that Libya appears to have fallen into. Farj Lashrash, a soldier with the opposition, said the rebels had captured 10 pro-Gadhafi soldiers since Wednesday night. The western gate of the nearby rebel-held town of Ajdabiya, which buried five dead, was reinforced with heavy weaponry - including a tank, four anti-aircraft guns mounted on pickup trucks and four rocket launchers.

Gadhafi's forces seem unable to bring significant strength to dislodge rebels from the territory they hold. But the opposition does not have the capability to go on the offense against Gadhafi's strongholds in the west, including the capital, Tripoli. Its leaders have pleaded for foreign powers to launch airstrikes to help them oust Gadhafi as the United States moves military forces closer to Libyan shores.

A large group of ethnic Tuareg have left from the city of Kidal in northern Mali for Libya in the last week, according to a senior elected official in Mali who spoke on condition of anonymity because he feared government retribution. Kidal, the base of a rebellion by the Tuareg over the years, is about a two days' drive across the desert to southern Libya. The official, who added that even some of his relatives had gone, said the men were lured by money. Another man in Mali who is in touch with people en route to Libya said about 40 cars of prospective fighters have crossed into Algeria. They are hesitating about crossing into Libya, fearing that anti-Gadhafi forces were guarding the frontier, the man said. Both spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisal.

Doubts surround Gaddafi's chemical weapons arsenal, Reuters reported: US intelligence agencies are reporting that forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi have stepped up security around Libya's principal remaining stockpile of agents used in chemical weapons. But US agencies are unsure they know where all of the Libyan chemical stockpiles are located, officials said. By the same token, international experts say that years ago, Libya destroyed most if not all of the weapons systems which would enable troops to fire chemical agents in combat. This means that even if some of the agents were pilfered, it would be hard for those who stole them to use them.

An official familiar with US government analyses said on Wednesday Washington had indications that in recent days security around the main chemicals cache had been "upgraded." Officials declined to say how the US knows security had been improved. International watchdogs said last month that Libya retained 9.5 metric tons of deadly mustard gas but lacked delivery systems. US officials declined to identify where the remaining chemicals are stored or specify the nature of the security improvements that the United States had learned about. But one of the officials said US agencies believe the security upgrade was made by forces loyal to Gaddafi rather than opponents of his embattled government.

International monitors have reported the chemicals are stored far away from Tripoli. A senior Pentagon official told Congress in 2006 that they were stored at a remote desert location about 375 miles from the Libyan capital. Still, another US official warned it was "not entirely clear that the Libyan government is in full control of all the remaining stockpiles." US officials, who asked for anonymity when discussing sensitive information, said Washington lacks complete confidence about the security of all of Libya's chemical caches because it is possible some material could be stored in locations unknown to US intelligence.

Michael Luhan, a spokesman for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), an international watchdog based in the Netherlands, said his agency could not confirm whether the security of Libya's remaining chemicals stockpile had recently been bolstered. "We have seen nothing to indicate that security has changed," Luhan told Reuters, adding that his agency's mandate "is inspection and verification rather than security, which is the responsibility of the government concerned." Last month the OPCW reported that, in 2004, Libya destroyed its inventory of aerial bombs that could be used to deliver chemical agents.

It also said that Gaddafi's government last year had destroyed a large amount of mustard gas -- about 54 percent of its stockpile -- and agreed to destroy the rest by this May. Given the lack of delivery mechanisms, experts question whether the chemicals pose much of a threat. "The gas isn't weaponized and I doubt if it could be within a military significant timeframe," a former Western government official said. "The residual stocks of mustard gas are probably badly degraded and as much of a threat to those holding them as to any potential targets."

IIFOR said to AIIS that there is still a danger that Gaddafi may use dirty bombs based on his significant stock of mustard gas, i.e. chemical warfare. Say, mustard gas may be placed on trucks together with explosives, as IED-dirty bombs (IED is Improvised Explosive Device], and driven into crowds, and then made to explode, one way or the other! Reuters continued...

Analyst View: How serious is the Chavez Libya peace plan? The Arab League head Amr Moussa said on the Thursday the group would consider a proposal by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez to negotiate a peaceful settlement to Libya's intensifying conflict. Energy analysts consulted by Reuters said they saw little chance that any Chavez-backed plan would succeed.

JOEL HIRST, FELLOW, US-BASED COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS. "Gaddafi is an ideological friend and ally who has stood with Chavez in difficult times and now Chavez is reciprocating. It is unclear whether the Arab League or the UN will agree given his clear bias in favor of Gaddafi. If Chavez can spin this that he is a powerful figure astride the world stage who can solve international problems while propping up an ally who he is really worried will be overthrown, it will help Chavez with anti-American countries who like to see America lose. It won't help him domestically."

SAMUEL CISZUK, Middle East Analyst, IHS Energy, London: "I don't think that another relatively extreme leader who is an ally to Gaddafi has a chance to be accepted as a peace-broker. It's very unlikely to work." "It has become likely that Libyan fighting will affect, and potentially destroy, oil infrastructure serving the country's largest, central basin, which is right on the fault line between Gaddafi loyalists and rebels." "The violence and bomb strikes could hit export terminals, and might extend to upstream infrastructure and pipelines. I think that the risk of Libyan oil exports remaining affected for a long period are already being priced into oil."

OLIVIER JAKOB, Swiss-based research firm Petromatrix: "Prices have weakened on the news, or the rumor, that Gaddafi could accept a proposal made by Chavez for mediation. Chavez' credibility does not fly very high; the only value of such a proposal is if it offers some honorable way out for the Gaddafi clan. The only value is if it offers a face-saving way out to exile."

CHRISTOPHE BARRET, analyst, Credit Agricole CIB, London: "Whatever comes of it, the plan looks very vague and I don't think it will be seriously considered. An earlier press report indicated the Arab League 'accepted' the plan, but we now see that isn't the case." "The possibility of very lengthy conflict in Libya has increased. What is most worrisome today is how close to the country's oil installations the violence has come. Exports from Libya could be wiped out."

CARSTEN FRITSCH, Analyst at Commerzbank in Frankfurt: "There is probably no chance that rebels would be willing to sit down at a negotiating table with Gaddafi now. It's highly unlikely a Chavez peace proposal could work." "Government forces are attacking the oil city of Brega, and this city is at the center of the conflict. According to state oil company NOC, Libya's oil infrastructure hasn't been damaged yet. But the risk of damage is increasing, and that could make it harder for Libya to resume oil supplies any time soon."

TIM RIDDELL, head of technical analysis at ANZ in Singapore: "If it's coming out of Chavez, it might not have a great degree of substance. I don't think it has a lot of credence, but it just looks like it's causing some unwinding of the most recent speculative positions. The market was long oil and long gold."

Rebels push west, doubt over Chavez's Libya plan. Libyan rebels pushed west on Thursday, extending their grip on a key coast road as Muammar Gaddafi received a warning he would be held to account at The Hague for suspected crimes by his security forces. Venezuela said the Libyan leader had agreed to its proposal for an international commission to negotiate an end to the turmoil in the world's 12th largest oil exporting nation. But Gaddafi's son Saif al Islam said there was no need for any foreign mediation in the crisis, a leader of the uprising rejected talks with the veteran leader, and the Arab League said cautiously the plan was "under consideration".

In Paris, French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said France and Britain would support the idea of setting up a no-fly zone over Libya if Gaddafi's forces continued to attack civilians. US President Barack Obama said the United States and the international community must be ready to act rapidly to stop violence against civilians or a humanitarian crisis in Libya. CNN reported: President Obama repeats call for Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi to leave, saying he "has lost the legitimacy to lead."

The uprising, the bloodiest yet against a long-serving ruler in the Middle East or North Africa, has torn through the OPEC-member country and knocked out nearly 50 percent of its 1.6 million barrels per day output, the bedrock of its economy. In eastern Libya, witnesses said a warplane bombed Brega the oil terminal town 800 km (500 miles) east of Tripoli, for the second day, part of a struggle for control of a strategically vital coast road and oil industry facilities. Warplanes also launched two raids against the nearby rebel-held town of Ajbadiya, witnesses said.

"CIVILIAN AREAS NOT BOMBED". But Juma Amer, Secretary for African Affairs at the Libyan Foreign Ministry, told journalists: "Media reports that civilian areas were bombed are false. Police had been and are urged to use maximum self restraint." Saif said Brega was bombed to scare off militia fighters and to gain control of oil installations. "First of all the bombs (were) just to frighten them to go away," he told Britain's Sky News. On the ground, rebels leading the unprecedented popular revolt pushed their front line west of Brega. They said they had driven back troops loyal to Gaddafi to Ras Lanuf, site of another major oil terminal and 600 km (375 miles) east of Tripoli. They also said they had captured a group of mercenaries. In an angry scene at al-Uqayla, east of Ras Lanuf, a rebel shouted at a captured young African and alleged mercenary: "You were carrying guns, yes or no? You were with Gaddafi's brigades yes or no?" The silent youth was shoved onto his knees into the dirt. A man held a pistol close to the boy's face before a reporter protested and told the man the rebels were not judges.

In The Hague, International Criminal Court prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo said Gaddafi and members of his inner circle, could be investigated for alleged crimes committed since the uprising broke out in mid-February. "We have identified some individuals in the de facto or former authority who have authority over the security forces who allegedly committed the crimes," Moreno-Ocampo said. "They are Muammar Gaddafi, his inner circle including some of his sons, who had this de facto authority. There are also some people with formal authority who should pay attention to crimes committed by their people."

Libyan government spokesman Musa Ibrahim told BBC radio the news from The Hague was "close to a joke." "No fact-finding mission has been sent to Libya. No diplomats, no ministers, no NGOs or organisations of any type were sent to Libya to check the facts ... No one can be sent to prison based on media reports," he said. Ibrahim Mohammad Ali, a spokesman for the public security department, said Libya had told the United Nations it would allow visits by independent human rights observers. Libya is not a signatory of the ICC treaty, "but we are willing to deal with the ICC and take action against anyone who has acted outside the law," he told a Tripoli news conference.

As mentioned a spokesman for Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, a Gaddafi ally, said the Libyan government had accepted a Venezuelan plan to seek a negotiated solution to the conflict in Libya. Arab League Secretary-General Amr Moussa said the plan was under consideration and he was waiting for details from Caracas.

SKEPTICISM OVER CHAVEZ PLAN. Oil prices fell briefly on news of the plan, but traders said the fall was due to profit-taking and they were skeptical about any Venezuelan mediation. Brent crude fell more than $3 but by 20.00 GMT had recovered to $114.82. Chavez's plan would involve a commission from Latin America, Europe and the Middle East trying to reach a negotiated outcome between the Libyan leader and rebel forces.

An aide to Mustafa Abdel Jalil, head of the rebels' National Libyan Council, told Reuters the rebels were open to talks only on Gaddafi's resignation or exile to avoid more bloodshed. "There is nothing else to negotiate," he said. He also called for foreign air strikes to set up a "no-fly zone" to help the rebels topple Gaddafi.

Save The Children and Medecins Sans Frontieres said they were struggling to get medicine and care to Libya's needy, with gunmen blocking roads and civilians too scared to seek help. The government has tried to persuade people in Tripoli that life continues as normal. But there were queues at banks, and residents said food prices had gone up and the street value of the Libyan dinar had fallen dramatically against the dollar. The official news agency said the Libyan parliament had cut car fuel prices by 25 percent to 0.15 dinars ($0.12) a liter. A fish market near Tripoli's Green Square was mostly empty. "The situation is affecting us," said Ismail, a fisherman. "All the Egyptian workers who run the boats have left."

Just outside rebel-held Zawiyah, west of Tripoli, officials took foreign journalists to a local refinery to show it was controlled by the state. Officials said it was running normally. But in the center of Zawiyah, rebels were fully in control and said they had enough forces to repel any government attack. In the opposition stronghold of Benghazi, men of all ages gathered next to the courthouse engaged in fierce debates, enjoying their new-found freedom of speech.

"We must go to Tripoli and get rid of Gaddafi," shouted one, to murmurs of approval from those around him. "But we have only our shirts to protect us from the cannon," said Ahmed el Sherif, 60, standing on the edge of the group.

The upheaval is causing a humanitarian crisis, especially on the Tunisian border where tens of thousands of foreign workers have fled to safety. But an organized international airlift started to relieve the human flood from Libya as word spread to refugees that planes were taking them home.

Egypt: 'Fridays are the main direct action days, ... continued protests at Tahrir Square ...' was the anarchists' main resolution 12.02.2010. The Anarchist International - AI/IFA, and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section now call for mass demonstrations for freedom and democracy and against the totalitarian right fascist autocratic rule of Tantawi - Mubarak's Poodle, in Cairo -Tahrir Square, and all over Egypt tomorrow Friday 04.03.2011.

The present situation of continued revolt in Egypt is just an embryo-revolution, it may result in a) an abortion, an aborted revolution, or b) a real revolution, i.e. with substance. The revolution may in a way be seen as ongoing, but it is just an embryo-revolution - and no real revolution yet.

We call for an end of the present totalitarian right fascist autocratic regime, and a steady and orderly movement of the Egyptian social, i.e. economic and political/administrative - system towards real democracy, i.e. anarchy - a real revolution and continued increased libertarian degree, see System theory - Chapter V. B.! A development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions - more and more, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, including mass actions & industrial actions, and via organization, dialog and elections!

04.03.2011. Ad Libya Friday. NB! D-day in the weekend? World leaders closer to agreement of armed support to the Libyan people! The Libyan people ask for airstrikes! Gaddafi continues the genocide! Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying! Armed international actions are urgently needed!! Send in arms! Airstrikes! Still very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen!!! STILL RED ALERT! - And Egypt...

Monday 28.01.2011 the strategic picture was the following:

1. Ad. 'While international officials just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' 1. The US moved naval and air forces closer to Libya and said all options were open, including patrols of the North African nation's skies to protect its citizens from their ruler. 2. British Prime Minister David Cameron told lawmakers: "We do not in any way rule out the use of military assets". 3. Paris was studying "all solutions" - including military options. 4. Even a flight ban seemed unlikely in the short term. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, whose country would have to support such a move if the US and its allies wanted authorization from the UN Security Council... dismissed the idea in public remarks.

2. Ad. 'Gaddafi bombs and threatens with more bombing today of the Libyan people...' 1. Gaddafi called Zawiya's influential tribal leader Mohammed al-Maktouf and warned him that if the rebels don't leave the city's main square by early Tuesday, they will be hit by warplanes. 2. Several residents of the eastern city of Ajdabiya said Gaddafi's air force also bombed an ammunition depot nearby held by rebels. 3. On Monday, pro-Gaddafi forces retook control of the western border crossings with Tunisia that had fallen under opposition control and they bombed an ammunition depot in the rebel-held east, residents in the area said. 4. The opposition is backed by numerous units of the military. Gaddafi long kept the military weak, fearing a challenge to his rule, so many units are plagued by shortages of supplies and ammunition.

Tuesday 01.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following. NB! Gaddafi did not bomb any of the Libyan people with airstrikes, as suggested on Monday. But he still probably may do it!

3. Ad. 'World leaders still just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' The EU and the US have talked about the possibility of creating a no-fly zone over Libya. However, Russia's top diplomat ruled out the idea as "superfluous" and said world powers must instead focus on fully using the sanctions the UN Security Council approved over the weekend. [IIFOR's strategical experts said to AIIS that sanctions at best work in the long run, and are in no way sufficient to stop the genocide!] Others suggested the tactic - used successfully in northern Iraq and Bosnia - to prevent Gaddafi from bombing his own people. [IIFOR said to AIIS that this is compatible with the advice of AISC and the AI/IFA.] But Russia's consent is required as a veto-wielding member of the Security Council.

The White House said [war] ships were being redeployed in preparation for possible humanitarian efforts but stressed it "was not taking any options off the table." "We are looking at a lot of options and contingencies. No decisions have been made on any other actions," Defense Secretary Robert Gates said. French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe sounded a note of caution, saying military intervention would not happen without a clear United Nations mandate. British Prime Minister David Cameron said it was unacceptable that "Colonel Gaddafi can be murdering his own people using airplanes and helicopter gunships." General James Mattis, commander of US Central Command, told a Senate hearing that imposing a no-fly zone would be a "challenging" operation that would mean actual attack. "You would have to remove air defense capability in order to establish a no-fly zone, so no illusions here," he said. "It would be a military operation -- it wouldn't be just telling people not to fly airplanes."

Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying!

4. Ad. 'The Libyan people ask for airstrikes...' Several of the Libyan people have agreed on the following: Gaddafi's air force is a serious threat to us. We will welcome a no-fly zone on Gaddafi's warplanes over the whole of Libya. The only thing we object to is foreign troops on Libyan soil. Many would not oppose shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign warships or planes!

5. Wednesday 02.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following. In the morning the need for more arms to the Libyan people is about the same as Monday and Tuesday, i.e. urgent. The Libyan people are not opposed to shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign planes. The Libyan people object to foreign [regular ground] troops on Libyan soil. NB! Gaddafi did bomb the Libyan people with airstrikes, but most likely with no fatalities - so far! There may be more -- and more deadly -- later on, i.e. if his airforce is not bombed by internationals, very, very soon!!

Death toll updated to 6000 people according to NRK! More Libyan people including the rebel National Libyan Council ask for airstrikes by international forces! The National Libyan Council also told its forces will push westwards if Gaddafi refuses to step down. Thus, the need for more arms to the Libyan people is more an more urgent. See also the report of 02.03.2011.

6. Thursday 03.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following: About the same as Wednesday. The battle of Tripoli may happen in the weekend, i.e. D-day! Both the need for more arms and airstrikes by international forces are more and more urgent, but regular foreign ground forces are ruled out. World leaders talked about armed support on overtime - and were closer to agreement of armed support to the Libyan people! In this connection the following words of wisdom of Sun Tzu, and the Art of War, were mentioned:

1. "One may know how to conquer without being able to do it."
2. "There is no instance of a country having benefited from prolonged warfare."
3. "In war, then, let your great object be victory, not lengthy campaigns."
4. "Invincibility lies in the defence; the possibility of victory in the attack."


And... "If words of advice are not clear and distinct, and if they are not thoroughly understood, then the generals are to blame. But, if words of advice are clear and nothing happens, then it is the fault of the world's main leaders!" said General H. Mann of the
AISC to AIIS. "The advice from the AISC and the AI/IFA, to the world leaders, seems to be clear enough, and should be thoroughly understood..." IIFOR said to AIIS.

Libyan rebels pushed west on Thursday, extending their grip on a key coast road as Muammar Gaddafi received a warning he would be held to account at The Hague for suspected crimes by his security forces.

Thursday AIIS heard about a proposal by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez to negotiate a peaceful settlement to Libya's intensifying conflict. An aide to Mustafa Abdel Jalil, head of the rebels' National Libyan Council, told Reuters the rebels were open to talks only on Gaddafi's resignation or exile to avoid more bloodshed. "There is nothing else to negotiate," he said.

He also called for foreign air strikes to set up a "no-fly zone" to help the rebels topple Gaddafi. "We must go to Tripoli and get rid of Gaddafi," shouted one, to murmurs of approval from those around him. "But we have only our shirts to protect us from the cannon," said Ahmed el Sherif, 60, standing on the edge of the group.

In Paris, French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said France and Britain would support the idea of setting up a no-fly zone over Libya if Gaddafi's forces continued to attack civilians. US President Barack Obama said the United States and the international community must be ready to act rapidly to stop violence against civilians or a humanitarian crisis in Libya. CNN reported: President Obama repeats call for Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi to leave, saying he "has lost the legitimacy to lead."

Doubts surrounded Gaddafi's chemical weapons arsenal. IIFOR said to AIIS that there is still a danger that Gaddafi may use dirty bombs based on his significant stock of mustard gas, i.e. chemical warfare. Say, mustard gas may be placed on trucks together with explosives, as IED-dirty bombs (IED is Improvised Explosive Device], and driven into crowds, and then made to explode, one way or the other!

* Friday 04.03.2011 the strategic picture is the following: About the same as Thursday. The battle of Tripoli may happen in the weekend, i.e. D-day! Both the need for more arms and airstrikes by international forces are more and more urgent, but regular foreign ground forces are ruled out. World leaders are most likely closer to an agreement of armed support to the Libyan people! See also the reports of 02.03.2011 and 03.03.2011.

General H. Mann of the AISC said to AIIS: "World leaders should very, very soon come to an agreement of armed support to the Libyan people! They should not wait for a large massacre to happen before giving armed support! While the grass grows, the cow is dying!" In this connection the following words of wisdom of Sun Tzu, and the Art of War, may be mentioned:

5. "All warfare is based on deception. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near."
6. "Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak."
7. "
Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt."

8. "When strong, avoid them. If of high morale, depress them. Seem humble to fill them with conceit. If at ease, exhaust them. If united, separate them. Attack their weaknesses. Emerge to their surprise."
9."If quick, I survive. If not quick, I am lost. This is 'death'."

Thus: STILL RED ALERT - The conclusion: Armed international support actions for the Libyan people are urgently needed!! Send in arms! Airstrikes! Still very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen!!!

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared in a joint statement, to AIIS: Many Libyan people have been killed -- estimated to more than 6000 Thursday -- and even more will probably follow, say, due to probable bombing/airstrikes, and even may be use of mustard gas -- by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen. The situation in Libya is in reality genocide against the people, thousands murdered by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist, extremist, oligarchy with severe ochlarchy.

The situation in Libya is more and more similar to the more or less civil wars in the Balkan where the Serbian ruler and his henchmen were responsible for genocide. Now Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen in a similar way are responsible for genocide and rule of terror, i.e. terrorism, in Libya, against the Libyan people. Quite legitimate the Libyan people are claiming a development towards freedom & democracy and human rights - where Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, i.e. a totalitarian, fascist , extremist, oligarchy with severe violent ochlarchy, stand in the way...

In the Balkan more or less civil wars, the international anarchist movement (i.e. at that time IFA, see The official link-site of AI/IFA) via the AIIS/AIT was among the first to call for NATO airstrikes and bombing of the Serbian ruler and his henchmen, responsible for genocide - to stop this crime against humanity. The Americans and thus NATO waited far too long, but at last took relevant action against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen. This time we expect a more quick action, including direct actions, against the terror rule, i.e. terrorism, and genocide by Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, murdering the Libyan people.

Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying! NB! World leaders however now seem to be closer to an agreement of armed support to the Libyan people! This means RED ALERT and armed international actions very, very soon!!!

Send in arms! Ad Libyans saying a) 'we are for shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign planes', and b) 'we need help from outside' & 'we have only our shirts to protect us from the cannon', and similar; in addition to airstrikes and bombing of Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, the international community should supply the struggling Libyan people with arms - very, very soon! However many Libyans have said that they are not interested in regular ground forces from foreign powers, thus this is ruled out! A problem with possible hostages taken by Gaddafi and his henchmen is practically solved, and it is now very, very soon time for international armed actions!

Airstrikes! It is very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen's positions, also to avoid his probable tactic of using human shields, mixing with civilians in Tripoli, etc. Although this tactic may backfire somewhat due to too much spreading of his troops...

And take a look at Strategy and tactics, with links... especially the links! Remember: most of the members of The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and its sections are de facto acting generals... all on equal footing - none above!! Thus listen to our advice!

We call on Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen to step down - NOW!... i.e. if not today, within very few days!! And we call on the Libyan people: Remember Direct Action and Antimilitarism - an anarchist approach - IJA 2 (38) & The International Conference on Terrorism - IJA 4 (31)!!! As mentioned, it is very, very soon time for NATO (or similar international forces) airstrikes and bombing of Colonel Gaddafi and his henchmen, similar to the campaign against the Serbian ruler and his henchmen in the Balkan more or less civil wars. Gaddafi is very likely worse than the Serbian ruler!!!!

Libya clashes widen, Interpol issues Gaddafi alert, Reuters reported: Muammar Gaddafi's forces battled rebels on several fronts in a worsening of Libya's crisis on Friday and unrest erupted in the capital when gunmen fired to break up crowds shouting "Gaddafi is the enemy of God." Paris-based Interpol delivered a global alert against Gaddafi and 15 members of his inner circle to help police around the world enforce UN sanctions aimed at ending turmoil in the world's 12th largest oil exporter.

Vowing "victory or death," eastern-based rebels pressed home a westwards push toward Gaddafi's Tripoli stronghold with an attack on the oil town of Ras Lanuf, which lies on a strategic coastal road, claiming to have taken its airport. In the west, security forces loyal to Gaddafi launched an offensive to retake Zawiyah, a town near the capital that has for days been defying his rule, and residents said 30 civilians had been killed. Among the dead was the town's rebel commander. The rebellion in Zawiyah -- the closest rebel-held territory to the capital and also the site of an oil refinery -- has been an embarrassment to the authorities who are trying to show they control at least the west of the country. The government had said earlier the week it was not using military force to retake rebel-held cities although one official did not rule it out if all other options were exhausted.

POPULAR REVOLT. Eastern regions of the country, around the city of Benghazi, have already spun out of Gaddafi's control after a popular revolt against his four decades of rule. The rebels' grip on the coastal highway appears to be strengthening. The uprising against Gaddafi, the bloodiest yet against a long-serving ruler in the Arab world, has knocked out nearly 50 percent of the OPEC-member's 1.6 million barrels of oil per day output, the bedrock of its economy. The upheaval is causing a humanitarian crisis, especially on the Tunisian border where tens of thousands of foreign workers have fled to safety. But an organized international airlift started to relieve the human flood from Libya as word spread to refugees that planes were taking them home.

The rebels earlier told Reuters they were open to talks only on Gaddafi's exile or resignation following attacks on civilians that have provoked international condemnation, a raft of arms and economic sanctions and a war crimes probe."Victory or death ... We will not stop until we liberate all this country," Mustafa Abdel Jalil, head of the rebel National Libyan Council told supporters of the two-week-old uprising. Abdullah al-Mahdi, a rebel spokesman, told Al Jazeera opposition fighters would attack the capital once a "no-fly" zone was enforced by international powers to try to shatter Gaddafi's grip on the country of six million people.

Western nations have called for Gaddafi to go and are considering various options including the imposition of a no-fly zone, but are wary about any offensive military involvement. In developments likely to raise concern about dwindling food and medical supplies in rebel-held areas, reports from around the vast country suggested a sharp worsening of a conflict that the West fears could trigger a mass refugee exodus to Europe. In the east, rebels were attacking a military base on the outskirts of Ras Lanuf, an oil port on the Mediterranean, which has a refinery, pipelines and a terminal, and the army responded with artillery fire and helicopters firing machine guns. An oil facility at Zueitina, south of the Libyan rebel-held city of Benghazi, has been damaged and was on fire, Al Jazeera said, showing a video of black smoke rising from an oil plant.

In Zawiyah, about 50 km (30 miles) west of the capital, pro-Gaddafi forces fought for hours with rebels who have been holding the town center, two residents told Reuters."From 11 a.m. until now Gaddafi's mercenaries, mainly from Africa, have been opening fire on people here," said a local man called Ibrahim. "Hundreds of victims are now in the town hospital." "We have no choice but to continue our fight against this dictator."

In Tripoli, shooting rang out across Tajoura district as Gaddafi loyalists broke up a crowd of protesters seeking an end to his long rule and shouting "Gaddafi is the enemy of God!" The demonstrators spilled out of the Murat Adha mosque after Friday prayers, and several hundred of them began chanting for an end to Gaddafi's four decades in power."This is the end for Gaddafi. It's over. Forty years of crimes are over," said Faragha Salim, an engineer at the protest in Tajoura. Up to 100 people in Tripoli had been arrested, accused of helping the rebels, Al Jazeera said.

Earlier on Friday, rebel volunteers said a rocket attack by a government warplane just missed a rebel-held military base which houses an arsenal in the eastern town of Ajdabiyah. US President Barack Obama said he was concerned a bloody stalemate could develop between Gaddafi and rebel forces but gave no sign of a willingness to intervene militarily. "Muammar Gaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead and he must leave," Obama said.

ASSET FREEZE. As international efforts progressed to isolate the Libyan leader, Austria widened an asset freeze list to include a top official at the Libyan Investment Authority, Mustafa Zarti, because of possible ties to Gaddafi's inner circle. Zarti, 40, will be questioned by Austrian authorities on Friday, interior ministry spokesman Rudolf Gollia said. Zarti told Austrian radio he had no clue how much money the Gaddafi clan might have amassed in the Alpine republic. Libya's main sovereign wealth fund, the LIA, controls about $65 billion. It worked to enhance Libya's credibility on the international stage by acquiring stakes in European blue-chip firms including Italian bank UniCredit and British publisher Pearson, owner of the Financial Times.

Gadhafi forces battle rebels as 37 killed in Libya, Associated Press reported later on Friday: Moammar Gadhafi's [a.k.a. Colonel Gaddafi] regime struck back at its opponents with a powerful attack Friday on the closest opposition-held city to Tripoli and a barrage of tear gas and live ammunition to smother new protests in the capital. At least 37 people died in fighting and in an explosion at an ammunitions depot in Libya's rebellious east. The bloodshed signaled an escalation in efforts by both sides to break the deadlock that has gripped Libya's 18-day upheaval, which has lasted longer than the Egyptian revolt that led to the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak and inspired a wave of protests across the region.

So far, Gadhafi has had little success in taking back territory, with several rebel cities repelling assaults and the entire eastern half of the country under rebel control. But the opposition forces have seemed unable to go on the offensive to march on pro-Gadhafi areas. Meanwhile, in Tripoli - Gadhafi's most important bastion - his loyalists have waged a campaign of terror to ensure that protesters do not rise up in significant numbers.

Friday's assault on the rebel city of Zawiya, about 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, appeared to be the strongest yet by Gadhafi's forces after repeated earlier forays against it were beaten back. In the morning, troops from the elite Khamis Brigade - named after the Gadhafi son who commands it - bombarded the city's western edges with mortar shells, heavy machine guns, tanks and anti-aircraft weapons, several residents said. By the evening, another brigade had opened a front on the eastern side. Armed Zawiya citizens backed by allied army units were fighting back. The commander of the rebel forces - Col. Hussein Darbouk - was killed by fire from an anti-aircraft gun, said Alaa al-Zawi, an activist in the city. Darbouk was a colonel in Gadhafi's army who defected along with other troops in Zawiya early in the uprising.

A witness in Zawiya's hospital said at least 18 people were killed and 120 wounded. Libyan state TV reported the attackers had retaken the city. But al-Zawi, the witness and other residents said it remained in rebel hands, with skirmishes continuing after nightfall. A doctor on the scene said pro-Gadhafi fighters would not allow medics to treat the injured, opened fire on ambulances trying to assist and hauled away the bodies of some of the dead in an apparent effort to keep death toll reports low. The gunmen killed a wounded rebel with three shots as a medic tried to pull him to safety, then even threatened to shoot the medic, the doctor said. The doctor and witnesses spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.

The day's other fighting took place at Ras Lanouf, a small oil port 380 miles (620 kilometers) east of Tripoli, just outside the long swath of eastern Libya controlled by the opposition. Rebels attacked Ras Lanouf on Friday afternoon, feeling flush with victory after repelling Gadhafi forces who attacked them days earlier at Brega, a larger oil facility just to the east. Fighters armed with Kalashnikovs and heavy machine guns were seen streaming in pickup trucks and other vehicles from Brega heading in the direction of Ras Lanouf. They battled about 3,000 pro-Gadhafi troops, mainly around the facility's airstrip, said a resident of the town. She reported heavy explosions starting around 4 p.m. As night fell, the explosions eased, she said, but it was not clear who was in control of the complex, which includes a port and storage facilities for crude coming from fields in the deserts to the south.

Ahmed al-Zwei, a member of the post-uprising town committee in nearby Ajdabiya, said the rebels were in control of the Ras Lanouf airstrip and the oil and gas facilities, and the regime forces had returned to their base at Sirte, a Gadhafi stronghold. At least two dead and 16 wounded were taken to the hospital at nearby Ajdabiya, although that did not include the toll from other hospitals in the area. Al-Zwei, however, said the Gadhafi forces had killed 20 guards from the two facilities. The death toll couldn't immediately be confirmed.

To the northeast, hospital officials said at least 17 people were killed in an explosion at an ammunition storage facility at a military base about 20 miles (32 kilometers) from the rebel stronghold of Benghazi. The blast destroyed one warehouse in the base and damaged a second, according to an ambulance driver who said he recovered body parts from the scene. The driver spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the media. "There were so many people killed. I can't describe it," said a resident of Benghazi who gave his name as Abdullah and whose voice was filled with emotion. Dr. Habib al-Obeidi in Benghazi's al-Jalaa hospital says the blast also hit a residential area. Witnesses on the scene, said secondary explosions destrpued two firetrucks. The cause of the blast was unclear. Al-Obeidi says it apparently was triggered when people went into the storage facility to collect weapons, but others blamed pro-Gadhafi saboteurs.

The fall of other parts of the country has made control of Tripoli crucial for Gahdafi. His loyalists have taken fierce action to ensure protesters cannot rise up and overwhelm the city as they have in other places. Last week, Friday marches were met by gunfire from militiamen shooting into crowds, killing a still undetermined number. Since then, pro-Gadhafi forces have carried out a wave of arrests against suspected demonstrators, snatching some from their homes in nighttime raids and terrorizing even the most restive neighborhoods. The fear seemed to have had an impact, and some protests planned Friday in other parts of the capital didn't get off the ground. One resident said he went to prayers at a downtown mosque and found police officers standing outside to ensure no one marched. After prayers, worshippers dispersed without protests.

Some 400 protesters marched out of the Murad Agha mosque after noon prayers in the eastern Tripoli district of Tajoura, chanting, "The people want to bring the regime down!" and waved the red, black and green flag of Libya's pre-Gadhafi monarchy, which has become the banner of the uprising. Pro-Gadhafi forces quickly moved in. They fired volleys of tear gas and - when the marchers continued - opened fire with live ammunition, according to witnesses. It was not clear if they fired at the crowd or into the air, but the protesters scattered, many of them taking refuge back in the mosque, according to an Associated Press reporter at the scene. A doctor said several people were wounded and taken to a hospital.

"All these people are threatened with death," said a 35-year-old among the Tajoura protesters Friday. "We have no education, no economy, no infrastructure. ... We want nothing but the end of the regime. We were born free but he is suppressing us." He said he had recently had kidney surgery, but "look at me, still I went out with the people because we are oppressed people." "I am not afraid," said another man in the march. "We want to show the world that we are not afraid." Thousands of Gadhafi supporters later packed into the capital's central Green Square, waving green flags and pictures of the Libyan leader in a counterdemonstration complete with fireworks. Armed men dressed in blue formed a security cordon around mosques in Tripoli while helicopters buzzed overhead.

Before prayers, some 1,500 worshippers inside the Murad Agha mosque debated what to do. At one point, they decided to hold a sit-in inside the mosque to avoid coming under gunfire by stepping outside. In the mosque's courtyard, they burned a copy of the Green Book, Gadhafi's political manifesto, as well as the green flag of Gadhafi's Libya. At the same time, young men from the neighborhood transformed a nearby square, tearing down posters of the Libyan leader and replacing them with the flags. They spray-painted walls with graffiti reading, "Down with Gadhafi" and "Tajoura will dig your grave." In the end, the 400 worshippers in the mosque decided to march.

Internet services, which have been spotty throughout Libya's upheaval, appeared to be halted completely in Tripoli on Friday before the protests. Renesys Corp., a Manchester, New Hampshire, company that maps the pathways of the Internet, said it wasn't able to reach any of the websites it tried to access inside Libya. Google's transparency report, which shows traffic to the company's sites from various countries, also showed that Internet traffic in Libya had fallen to zero. Libyan authorities briefly barred many foreign journalists from leaving their Tripoli hotel, claiming it was for their protection because they had information "al-Qaeda elements" planned to open fire on police to spark clashes. They later allowed them to go out. Several hours before prayers, security forces began taking up positions. In Tajoura, police set up two checkpoints on the main highway to downtown. They stopped cars to search them, check IDs and question them.

The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & The Anarchist International - AI/IFA and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including the anarchosyndicalist labor confederation International Workers of the World and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa, declared in a joint statement, to AIIS: Ad a) the present stalemate and quagmire in Libya, and b) that opposition fighters would attack the capital Tripoli once a "no-fly" zone is enforced by international powers, c) joint NATO airstrikes in Libya are very, very urgently needed, i.e. similar to the 'Bosnia-case' a.o.t. using Italian NATO bases...

***

Egypt Friday: The Anarchist International - AI/IFA, and all its sections, see The official link-site of AI/IFA, including The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section call for mass demonstrations for freedom and democracy and against the totalitarian right fascist autocratic rule of Tantawi - Mubarak's Poodle, in Cairo -Tahrir Square, and all over Egypt - today Friday 04.03.2011.

The present situation of continued revolt in Egypt is just an embryo-revolution, it may result in a) an abortion, an aborted revolution, or b) a real revolution, i.e. with substance. The revolution may in a way be seen as ongoing, but it is just an embryo-revolution - and no real revolution yet.

We call for an end of the present totalitarian right fascist autocratic regime, and a steady and orderly movement of the Egyptian social, i.e. economic and political/administrative - system towards real democracy, i.e. anarchy - a real revolution and continued increased libertarian degree, see System theory - Chapter V. B.! A development towards real democracy must be done by the people's actions - more and more, i.e. act with dignity, use real matter of fact arguments and add weight behind via direct actions, including mass actions & industrial actions, and via organization, dialog and elections! And we call on the main international newsmedia to report about today's demonstrations in Egypt!

About 10 000 demonstrated at Tahrir Square - Thus much smaller mass protest than last Friday. The smaller protest was probably due to the replacement of "old guard" interim PM Ahmed Shafiq with more popular Essam Sharaf on Thursday, as the main demand of the earlier planned protest Friday 04.03.2011 was 'Shafiq Out!'. As this demand was met already on Thursday, most of the air of the balloon went out, IIFOR reported to AIIS. Most of the main international newsemedia reported about the event.

CNN reported a.o.t. that the protesters wanted a full overhaul of the constitution, i.e. not the marginal changes so far proposed, and about a very strong opposition against the military rule, and later presented a short video of the event. In this connection the following libertarian resolution of 16.02.2011, may be repeated:

"We declare: Marginal constitutional changes to referendum are a mockery of the people. The people want the best of Norway, Switzerland and Iceland's constitutions, and secular with an Egyptian touch now, and should have this option in the referendum now. Stop the Muslim Brotherhood from "taking a Hamas" now. It is perhaps not possible later!" said a spokesperson for The International Workers of the World - Egyptian section and The Anarchist Confederation of Africa - Egyptian section to AIIS

Egypt new PM visits Tahrir Square, seeks legitimacy, Reuters reported: Egypt's new Prime Minister-designate Essam Sharaf told thousands of protesters in Tahrir Square on Friday that he would work to meet their demands and saluted the "martyrs" of the country's revolution. He told the crowd he had come "to draw legitimacy" from them. He was cheered by the crowd and carried away from the podium on the shoulders of protesters and escorted by military police. Sharaf, a former transport minister, was appointed by Egypt's military rulers on Thursday [03.03.2011] to replace Ahmed Shafiq, the former air force officer who had been appointed by Hosni Mubarak before he was toppled from the presidency on Feb. 11.

Thursday Reuters reported: ... ElBaradei, who met with the military council for the first time [Thursday] this week along with the Arab League's Secretary-General Amr Moussa, who is also expected to run for president, said he had recommended Sharaf as a potential prime minister after consulting with youth groups."Sharaf was one person on a list of recommendations I presented to the army council. There is a consensus over him as a person of integrity," ElBaradei said.

Shafiq, an air force commander, has been tipped by one military source as a potential contender for the presidency in a forthcoming election. This would ensure the armed forces would have one of their own members in Egypt's top post."His early resignation from office potentially opens the way for him to run in presidential elections," an official said. Shafiq was appointed by Mubarak in his final days in office before he was ousted on February 11 after an 18-day popular uprising which shook the Middle East. Protests have since demanded that he step down.

Asked if he would run for presidency this year, ElBaradei said: "This is a question I do not have to answer today. I need to complete what I set to do which is to shift Egypt from a dictatorship to a liberated Egypt. We will see as we go along."

Egypt sets March 19 date for referendum. A referendum on amendments to Egypt's constitution will take place on March 19, the Egyptian government said on its Facebook page, quoting the ruling Supreme Council for the Armed Forces. "The process of the referendum on the proposed amendments to the constitution of the Arab Republic of Egypt will take place on March 19, 2011," a statement on the government's Facebook page said.

Egypt's new PM vows to meet protesters' demands, Associated Press reported: Egypt's prime minister-designate vowed Friday before thousands of demonstrators at a central Cairo square to do everything he could to meet their demands for political change and pleaded with them to turn their attention to "rebuilding" the country. Meanwhile, the Supreme Armed Forces Council that took control of the country from ousted President Hosni Mubarak said a referendum on constitutional changes to allow for competitive parliamentary and presidential elections will be held on March 19.

The new prime minister, Essam Sharaf, was picked by Egypt's military rulers on Thursday to replace Ahmed Shafiq. Shafiq was the last premier to be named by Mubarak, and his resignation was among the major opposition demands. A former transport minister, Sharaf endeared himself to the protesters when he joined the demonstrations that forced Mubarak to resign. He made his address Friday at Tahrir Square, the protests' epicenter."I draw will and determination from here," he told the estimated 10,000 demonstrators. "I will do my utmost to realize your demands," he said, pledging to step down if he fails. Sharaf, a US-educated civil engineer, served in the cabinet for 18 months between 2004 and 2005.

His appearance at the square on Friday - he was carried on the shoulders of demonstrators to and from the podium - was the latest evidence of the power retained by the youth groups nearly a month after they ousted Mubarak. Sharaf's government will serve in a caretaker capacity until parliamentary elections are held. However, Sharaf declined to take an oath of office before the demonstrators as they demanded and left the square amid chants of "Swear! Swear!"

The protesters had planned the Friday rally to press for Shafiq's resignation. When he stepped down a day earlier, they said they would go ahead with their gathering to celebrate what they consider the latest victory for the 18-day popular uprising that forced out Mubarak on Feb. 11. Besides Shafiq's resignation, the revolt's leaders [read: main spokerspersons and activists, as the opposition is mainly leaderless] want Mubarak's National Democratic Party dissolved along with the hated State Security Agency blamed for some of the worst human rights violations during Mubarak's rule. Other demands include the prosecution of security officials behind the deaths of protesters and the release of political prisoners.

"I am here because I get my legitimacy from you," Sharaf, in a gray business suit but no tie, told the demonstrators. He called on the protesters to turn their attention to "rebuilding Egypt." "I pray to God that I see an Egypt where free opinions are voiced outside (prison) cells and security agencies are in the service of the nation."

The constitutional changes to be voted on affect 10 articles of the currently suspended charter. They open presidential elections to competition and impose a two-term limit on future presidents - a dramatic shift from a system that allowed Mubarak to rule for three decades. The proposals address a number of the demands of the reform movement. But many say the changes don't go far enough and debate is still under way over which election should come first.

Al-Qaeda No. 2 calls for islamic rule in Egypt. Osama bin Laden's deputy is urging fellow Egyptians to establish islamic rule after the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. In an Internet audio message, Ayman al-Zawahri warns the "honest and free people" of Egypt and Tunisia not to allow America and others steal the fruits of their uprisings by allowing them to install puppet regimes. It's Al-Zawahri's fourth message since the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt. The 28-minute recording was posted on a militant website Friday. He also urged Yemenis to continue their struggle to topple President Ali Abdullah Saleh's regime, which he said turned Yemen into an American spy base. Yemen is home to an al-Qaeda offshoot. Before becoming deputy al-Qaeda leader, the Egyptian al-Zawahri headed the Al-Jihad extremist group that battled Mubarak's regime.

Egypt, Tunisia tourism recovering fast, Reuters reported: Tourists are returning quickly to Egypt and Tunisia after the uprising there, according to the German travel association DRV. The two countries are a popular destination for Germans, who spent more than any other nation on holidays abroad in 2010, said the DRV. Juergen Buechy, president of the DRV said the unrest would have a short-term effect on travel there, but that bookings were already significantly improving."I am certain Egypt and Tunisia will recover quickly and reclaim their place on the tourism map," he told journalists on Friday. "Many Germans have sympathy with the peaceful uprisings," he added. The anarchists welcome this contribution to the economy in Egypt and Tunisia.

05.03.2011. Ad Libya Saturday. The battle of Tripoli may still happen in the weekend or soon after, i.e. D-day, but at large dependent on more arms to the rebels and airstrikes by international forces; regular foreign ground forces are ruled out! And Egypt.

Monday 28.01.2011 the strategic picture was the following:

1. Ad. 'While international officials just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' 1. The US moved naval and air forces closer to Libya and said all options were open, including patrols of the North African nation's skies to protect its citizens from their ruler. 2. British Prime Minister David Cameron told lawmakers: "We do not in any way rule out the use of military assets". 3. Paris was studying "all solutions" - including military options. 4. Even a flight ban seemed unlikely in the short term. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, whose country would have to support such a move if the US and its allies wanted authorization from the UN Security Council... dismissed the idea in public remarks.

2. Ad. 'Gaddafi bombs and threatens with more bombing today of the Libyan people...' 1. Gaddafi called Zawiya's influential tribal leader Mohammed al-Maktouf and warned him that if the rebels don't leave the city's main square by early Tuesday, they will be hit by warplanes. 2. Several residents of the eastern city of Ajdabiya said Gaddafi's air force also bombed an ammunition depot nearby held by rebels. 3. On Monday, pro-Gaddafi forces retook control of the western border crossings with Tunisia that had fallen under opposition control and they bombed an ammunition depot in the rebel-held east, residents in the area said. 4. The opposition is backed by numerous units of the military. Gaddafi long kept the military weak, fearing a challenge to his rule, so many units are plagued by shortages of supplies and ammunition.

Tuesday 01.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following. NB! Gaddafi did not bomb any of the Libyan people with airstrikes, as suggested on Monday. But he still probably may do it!

3. Ad. 'World leaders still just talk about armed support to the Libyan people...' The EU and the US have talked about the possibility of creating a no-fly zone over Libya. However, Russia's top diplomat ruled out the idea as "superfluous" and said world powers must instead focus on fully using the sanctions the UN Security Council approved over the weekend. [IIFOR's strategical experts said to AIIS that sanctions at best work in the long run, and are in no way sufficient to stop the genocide!] Others suggested the tactic - used successfully in northern Iraq and Bosnia - to prevent Gaddafi from bombing his own people. [IIFOR said to AIIS that this is compatible with the advice of AISC and the AI/IFA.] But Russia's consent is required as a veto-wielding member of the Security Council.

The White House said [war] ships were being redeployed in preparation for possible humanitarian efforts but stressed it "was not taking any options off the table." "We are looking at a lot of options and contingencies. No decisions have been made on any other actions," Defense Secretary Robert Gates said. French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe sounded a note of caution, saying military intervention would not happen without a clear United Nations mandate. British Prime Minister David Cameron said it was unacceptable that "Colonel Gaddafi can be murdering his own people using airplanes and helicopter gunships." General James Mattis, commander of US Central Command, told a Senate hearing that imposing a no-fly zone would be a "challenging" operation that would mean actual attack. "You would have to remove air defense capability in order to establish a no-fly zone, so no illusions here," he said. "It would be a military operation -- it wouldn't be just telling people not to fly airplanes."

Must a large massacre happen before world leaders give armed support? Then, who are responsible if a large massacre happens? While the grass grows, the cow is dying!

4. Ad. 'The Libyan people ask for airstrikes...' Several of the Libyan people have agreed on the following: Gaddafi's air force is a serious threat to us. We will welcome a no-fly zone on Gaddafi's warplanes over the whole of Libya. The only thing we object to is foreign troops on Libyan soil. Many would not oppose shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign warships or planes!

5. Wednesday 02.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following. In the morning the need for more arms to the Libyan people is about the same as Monday and Tuesday, i.e. urgent. The Libyan people are not opposed to shelling the positions of pro-Gaddafi forces by foreign planes. The Libyan people object to foreign [regular ground] troops on Libyan soil. NB! Gaddafi did bomb the Libyan people with airstrikes, but most likely with no fatalities - so far! There may be more -- and more deadly -- later on, i.e. if his airforce is not bombed by internationals, very, very soon!!

Death toll updated to 6000 people according to NRK! More Libyan people including the rebel National Libyan Council ask for airstrikes by international forces! The National Libyan Council also told its forces will push westwards if Gaddafi refuses to step down. Thus, the need for more arms to the Libyan people is more an more urgent. See also the report of 02.03.2011.

6. Thursday 03.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following: About the same as Wednesday. The battle of Tripoli may happen in the weekend, i.e. D-day! Both the need for more arms and airstrikes by international forces are more and more urgent, but regular foreign ground forces are ruled out. World leaders talked about armed support on overtime - and were closer to agreement of armed support to the Libyan people! In this connection the following words of wisdom of Sun Tzu, and the Art of War, were mentioned:

1. "One may know how to conquer without being able to do it."
2. "There is no instance of a country having benefited from prolonged warfare."
3. "In war, then, let your great object be victory, not lengthy campaigns."
4. "Invincibility lies in the defence; the possibility of victory in the attack."


And... "If words of advice are not clear and distinct, and if they are not thoroughly understood, then the generals are to blame. But, if words of advice are clear and nothing happens, then it is the fault of the world's main leaders!" said General H. Mann of the
AISC to AIIS. "The advice from the AISC and the AI/IFA, to the world leaders, seems to be clear enough, and should be thoroughly understood..." IIFOR said to AIIS.

Libyan rebels pushed west on Thursday, extending their grip on a key coast road as Muammar Gaddafi received a warning he would be held to account at The Hague for suspected crimes by his security forces.

Thursday AIIS heard about a proposal by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez to negotiate a peaceful settlement to Libya's intensifying conflict. An aide to Mustafa Abdel Jalil, head of the rebels' National Libyan Council, told Reuters the rebels were open to talks only on Gaddafi's resignation or exile to avoid more bloodshed. "There is nothing else to negotiate," he said.

He also called for foreign air strikes to set up a "no-fly zone" to help the rebels topple Gaddafi. "We must go to Tripoli and get rid of Gaddafi," shouted one, to murmurs of approval from those around him. "But we have only our shirts to protect us from the cannon," said Ahmed el Sherif, 60, standing on the edge of the group.

In Paris, French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said France and Britain would support the idea of setting up a no-fly zone over Libya if Gaddafi's forces continued to attack civilians. US President Barack Obama said the United States and the international community must be ready to act rapidly to stop violence against civilians or a humanitarian crisis in Libya. CNN reported: President Obama repeats call for Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi to leave, saying he "has lost the legitimacy to lead."

Doubts surrounded Gaddafi's chemical weapons arsenal. IIFOR said to AIIS that there is still a danger that Gaddafi may use dirty bombs based on his significant stock of mustard gas, i.e. chemical warfare. Say, mustard gas may be placed on trucks together with explosives, as IED-dirty bombs (IED is Improvised Explosive Device], and driven into crowds, and then made to explode, one way or the other!

7. Friday 04.03.2011 the strategic picture was the following: About the same as Thursday. The battle of Tripoli may happen in the weekend, i.e. D-day! Both the need for more arms and airstrikes by international forces are more and more urgent, but regular foreign ground forces are ruled out. World leaders are most likely closer to an agreement of armed support to the Libyan people! See also the reports of 02.03.2011 and 03.03.2011.

General H. Mann of the AISC said to AIIS: "World leaders should very, very soon come to an agreement of armed support to the Libyan people! They should not wait for a large massacre to happen before giving armed support! While the grass grows, the cow is dying!" In this connection the following words of wisdom of Sun Tzu, and the Art of War, may be mentioned:

5. "All warfare is based on deception. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near."
6. "Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak."
7. "Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt."

8. "When strong, avoid them. If of high morale, depress them. Seem humble to fill them with conceit. If at ease, exhaust them. If united, separate them. Attack their weaknesses. Emerge to their surprise."
9."If quick, I survive. If not quick, I am lost. This is 'death'."

Friday Libya clashes widened. More bloodshed signaled an escalation in efforts by both sides to break the deadlock, but mostly in vain. Gaddafi's forces battled rebels on several fronts in a worsening of Libya's crisis, and unrest erupted in the capital Tripoli where Gaddafi's gunmen fired to break up crowds. So far, Gaddafi has had little success in taking back territory, with several rebel cities repelling assaults and the entire eastern half of the country under rebel control. But the opposition forces have seemed unable to go on the offensive to march on pro-Gaddafi areas.

Vowing "victory or death" and declaring "we have no choice but to continue our fight against this dictator"; "all these people are threatened with death"; "we have no [military] education, no economy, no infrastructure"and "we want nothing but the end of the regime"; the opposition forces seem still determined and in high moral, but also more desperate. Abdullah al-Mahdi, a rebel spokesman, told Al Jazeera opposition fighters would attack the capital Tripoli once a "no-fly" zone was enforced by international powers to try to shatter Gaddafi's grip on the country of six million people.

Western nations have called for Gaddafi to go and are considering various options including the imposition of a no-fly zone, but are wary about any offensive military involvement. US President Barack Obama said he was concerned a bloody stalemate could develop between Gaddafi and rebel forces but gave no sign of a willingness to intervene militarily. "Muammar Gaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead and he must leave," Obama repeated. Meanwhile, in Tripoli - Gaddafi's most important bastion - his loyalists have waged a campaign of terror to ensure that protesters do not rise up in significant numbers.

In the evening The Anarchist International Security Council (AISC) & <